Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

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Elahrairah
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Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby Elahrairah » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:31 am

I'm thinking about taking the February 2012 LSAT intending to cancel my score as a dry run before the June test. Has anyone here done this and found it helpful? Does LSAC frown on this sort of thing? Can law schools see that you've taken the LSAT before and canceled ? Do they care?

akotran
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby akotran » Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:00 pm

How about you just pay me to proctor the exam? I'll do it for half the cost of the real thing.

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Bildungsroman
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby Bildungsroman » Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:01 pm

I cannot possibly hope to understand what the point of this would be.

FloridaCoastalorbust
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby FloridaCoastalorbust » Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:15 pm

I know someone that did the same thing June 11 and was very pleased to get the test day experience.

paulinaporizkova
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby paulinaporizkova » Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:33 pm

I think this may be a specific intent crime at common law

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Campagnolo
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby Campagnolo » Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:39 pm

Do not do this. I took and canceled, and it was a huge mistake.

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Jeffort
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby Jeffort » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:13 pm

One cancellation on your record doesn't really matter/will not raise any eyebrows if you only take it twice, but you throw $$$ away to get the test day experience.

It is best to only have one reported score/record of having taken the test that is the best score you can achieve and nothing else on your IRR report which is included in your CAS report with applications.

Doing a trial dry run to experience real test day procedures and conditions does have some benefits so that you know what to expect the next time. It also has drawbacks including the three tests in two years limit in case something goes wrong next time plus then having a canceled score on your record. The admissions committees philosophies are in flux due to many changing variables and recent LSAC policy changes.

I recommend that you just have a friend proctor you with a recent test you have never been exposed to before in the way I described in another thread:

Stay honest when taking timed practice tests down to every single detail. The second 35 minutes expires, that's it for the section, don't give yourself a few extra seconds to finish a problem or bubble in some answers. Only one 15 minute break after section three, no brief breaks between other sections, not even 30 seconds or a minute since that's the way it will be on test day. "Pencils down, stop working on section X, turn the page to section X+1, GO."

Also, don't use scratch paper, and certainly use an official bubble sheet for your answers. You also should transition yourself to taking timed practice tests at the time in the morning the test typically starts (9:15am-10am typically) and take them in an environment away from home that you don't have control over.

One thing I've had some students do for timed practice tests close to test day is recruit/bribe a friend to come over and pound on the door at the time you'll need to wake up to get to the test center on time and then be your proctor for the day.

It's hardcore.

The friends job is to play drill sergeant and proctor. That includes the friend putting you through a bunch of time consuming activities before letting you start taking the test. After he/she makes sure you are awake on time to get your morning routine done and have the necessary items in a ziplock bag, you travel to a destination of his/her choice where you will take the test. Must arrive at that destination before 8:30am. Then, once settled in and at a table/desk the friend kills at least 30 minutes reading you instructions and/or whatever nonsense to waste time before handing you the test and answer sheet and gives you permission to start section one.



.
Last edited by Jeffort on Mon Dec 26, 2011 6:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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ben4847
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby ben4847 » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:27 pm

Jeffort wrote:One cancellation on your record doesn't really matter/will not raise any eyebrows if you only take it twice, but you throw $$$ away to get the test day experience.

It is best to only have one reported score/record of having taken the test that is the best score you can achieve and nothing else on your IRR report which is included in your CAS report with applications.

Doing a trial dry run to experience real test day procedures and conditions does have some benefits so that you know what to expect the next time. It also has drawbacks including the three tests in two years limit plus having a canceled score on your record. The admissions committees philosophies are in flux due to many changing variables and recent LSAC policy changes.

I recommend that you just have a friend proctor you with a recent test you have never been exposed to before in the way I described in another thread:

Stay honest when taking timed practice tests down to every single detail. The second 35 minutes expires, that's it for the section, don't give yourself a few extra seconds to finish a problem or bubble in some answers. Only one 15 minute break after section three, no brief breaks between other sections, not even 30 seconds or a minute since that's the way it will be on test day. "Pencils down, stop working on section X, turn the page to section X+1, GO."

Also, don't use scratch paper, and certainly use an official bubble sheet for your answers. You also should transition yourself to taking timed practice tests at the time in the morning the test typically starts (9:15am-10am typically) and take them in an environment away from home that you don't have control over.

One thing I've had students do for timed practice tests close to test day is recruit/bribe a friend to come over and pound on the door at the time you'll need to wake up to get to the test center on time and then be your proctor for the day.

It's hardcore.

The friends job is to play drill sergeant and proctor. That includes the friend putting you through a bunch of time consuming activities before letting you start taking the test. After he/she makes sure you are awake on time to get your morning routine done and have the necessary items in a ziplock bag, you travel to a destination of his/her choice where you will take the test. Must arrive at that destination before 8:30am. Then, once settled in and at a table/desk the friend kills at least 30 minutes reading you instructions and/or whatever nonsense to waste time before handing you the test and answer sheet and gives you permission to start section one.



.


That's some bizarre fetish.

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ThreeRivers
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby ThreeRivers » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:09 am

what the....

Take practice tests in a variety of settings / locations... Don't cheat, don't take extra breaks, don't look at your score after every section, use a watch you'll use on test day to check time during test, but set an alarm for 35 minutes that you can't look at, add an extra experimental section... etc


If you do all of that you'll be fine

JasonR
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby JasonR » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:45 am

Elahrairah wrote:I'm thinking about taking the February 2012 LSAT intending to cancel my score as a dry run before the June test. Has anyone here done this and found it helpful? Does LSAC frown on this sort of thing? Can law schools see that you've taken the LSAT before and canceled ? Do they care?


Schools can see that you canceled/were absent. They don't care at all about one cancel/absent mark on your record. The problem is you really put yourself in a tight spot for the June test. It has to go well no matter what. Even if you're puking your guts out.

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emkay625
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby emkay625 » Sun Dec 25, 2011 1:18 am

ben4847 wrote:
Jeffort wrote:One cancellation on your record doesn't really matter/will not raise any eyebrows if you only take it twice, but you throw $$$ away to get the test day experience.

It is best to only have one reported score/record of having taken the test that is the best score you can achieve and nothing else on your IRR report which is included in your CAS report with applications.

Doing a trial dry run to experience real test day procedures and conditions does have some benefits so that you know what to expect the next time. It also has drawbacks including the three tests in two years limit plus having a canceled score on your record. The admissions committees philosophies are in flux due to many changing variables and recent LSAC policy changes.

I recommend that you just have a friend proctor you with a recent test you have never been exposed to before in the way I described in another thread:

Stay honest when taking timed practice tests down to every single detail. The second 35 minutes expires, that's it for the section, don't give yourself a few extra seconds to finish a problem or bubble in some answers. Only one 15 minute break after section three, no brief breaks between other sections, not even 30 seconds or a minute since that's the way it will be on test day. "Pencils down, stop working on section X, turn the page to section X+1, GO."

Also, don't use scratch paper, and certainly use an official bubble sheet for your answers. You also should transition yourself to taking timed practice tests at the time in the morning the test typically starts (9:15am-10am typically) and take them in an environment away from home that you don't have control over.

One thing I've had students do for timed practice tests close to test day is recruit/bribe a friend to come over and pound on the door at the time you'll need to wake up to get to the test center on time and then be your proctor for the day.

It's hardcore.

The friends job is to play drill sergeant and proctor. That includes the friend putting you through a bunch of time consuming activities before letting you start taking the test. After he/she makes sure you are awake on time to get your morning routine done and have the necessary items in a ziplock bag, you travel to a destination of his/her choice where you will take the test. Must arrive at that destination before 8:30am. Then, once settled in and at a table/desk the friend kills at least 30 minutes reading you instructions and/or whatever nonsense to waste time before handing you the test and answer sheet and gives you permission to start section one.



.


That's some bizarre fetish.


that's what i was thinking....it's a little creepy......

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Jeffort
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby Jeffort » Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:17 pm

It's not a necessary routine for all LSAT takers. It's recommended for students that lack self discipline. In the last week or two before test day it is important to take timed practice tests under conditions similar to those you will experience on test day.

Many people score lower on test day compared to how they performed on practice tests because of the difference between the conditions they took practice tests in versus actual test day conditions where you have no control over the environment, schedule and procedures. There are many threads and posts on this board (and elsewhere) going back years from people that scored anywhere from three to ten or more points lower than their last week or two before the administration practice test score range.

I don't understand what is creepy about recruiting a friend to be your proctor for several hours. It's a fun way to get conditioned so you wont be as stressed out with a lot of test day anxiety and mess up due to different environmental conditions.

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ThreeRivers
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby ThreeRivers » Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:21 am

Lol I'll stick by my advice but I guess I could understand someone else proctoring one.... the whole reading 30 minutes of directions thing is extreme

If having to fill out your score, lsac account number, etc freaks you out then idk what to tell you lol

Usually I feel insanely lower scores come from:

1. Not taking Pts correctly
This includes ppl cheating on pts (I know I did at 1st), not taking pts properly (breaks and such), or not taking pts in variety of different locations (noise or quiet bothers you), if you mix up where you take them you are fine

2. Test day jitters over real things
Some ppl freak out when know they take the real thing. Your lil' experiment won't help much because ppl have done worse on the real thing than LSAT prep company pt proctor tests. Idk what to say other than ppl need to learn how to relax a little

3. Bad luck
Either they woke up sick, got a proctor who cut them 5 minutes shit, had "digestion problems" during the test, etc... Also I think more common than those variables are sometimes outliers just happen (just like they do in real Pts). I'm sure every once in awhile ppl BOMB a PT, unfortunately that pt might be the real thing for some

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Jeffort
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby Jeffort » Mon Dec 26, 2011 4:42 pm

ThreeRivers wrote:Lol I'll stick by my advice but I guess I could understand someone else proctoring one.... the whole reading 30 minutes of directions thing is extreme

If having to fill out your score, lsac account number, etc freaks you out then idk what to tell you lol

Usually I feel insanely lower scores come from:

1. Not taking Pts correctly
This includes ppl cheating on pts (I know I did at 1st), not taking pts properly (breaks and such), or not taking pts in variety of different locations (noise or quiet bothers you), if you mix up where you take them you are fine

2. Test day jitters over real things
Some ppl freak out when know they take the real thing. Your lil' experiment won't help much because ppl have done worse on the real thing than LSAT prep company pt proctor tests. Idk what to say other than ppl need to learn how to relax a little

3. Bad luck
Either they woke up sick, got a proctor who cut them 5 minutes shit, had "digestion problems" during the test, etc... Also I think more common than those variables are sometimes outliers just happen (just like they do in real Pts). I'm sure every once in awhile ppl BOMB a PT, unfortunately that pt might be the real thing for some


I think our perspectives are pretty much the same. As I described, the 30 minutes part is about wasting away approximately that amount of time somehow after getting to where you are going to take a practice test so that you start section one at about the same time it will begin on test day. It doesn't need to be reading instructions, it could be spent talking about sports, your dating/love life, zoning out staring at a wall, whatever.

It is, as I introduced it, the hardcore way to simulate test conditions. It's meant for people in your category #1 that have issues with self discipline and need someone else to keep them honest so they take a fresh practice test properly leading up to test day in order to get conditioned and to get an accurate indication of their current score range.

It sure beats wasting the LSAT registration fee $$$, one of your three chances to take it and then having a cancellation on your record just to get the test day experience, which is what the OP is considering and asked about.

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LexLeon
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby LexLeon » Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:27 pm

Money aside, I wouldn't want a "Cancel" to tarnish your record. There is something to be gained from the "official" experience, but I consider this to be trivial, and not nearly worth the costs to your LSAC credentials.

JasonR
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby JasonR » Tue Dec 27, 2011 1:57 pm

There are no "costs" (aside from obvious financial expense) to having a single cancelation on your record. The costs only begin if your second sitting goes poorly, since you'll have already wasted your mulligan.

bmore
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Re: Taking the LSAT with intent to cancel score

Postby bmore » Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:01 pm

Since you know you are cancelling, I dont think it would simulate taking the real test. My advice is don't do it.




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