Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

slsplease
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:03 pm

Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby slsplease » Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:15 pm

I've been told by a friend that I should sign up for a Powerscore class before the October LSAT which I plan on taking. I can't do June because of work and class. It seems that many people on TLS recommend Powerscore as well.

I'm worried because the class materials have a lot of homework and practice taken from the older tests. While they apparently don't use much from the more recent tests, I don't want to be stuck with only 20 untaken tests leading up to October as I'd like to be able to do at least 30 PTs.

For those of you who have taken the Powerscore class, what was the deal with virgin PTs?

VasaVasori
Posts: 573
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 2:36 pm

.

Postby VasaVasori » Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:38 pm

.
Last edited by VasaVasori on Sat May 02, 2015 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

VasaVasori
Posts: 573
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 2:36 pm

.

Postby VasaVasori » Fri Dec 23, 2011 9:34 pm

.
Last edited by VasaVasori on Sat May 02, 2015 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

slsplease
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:03 pm

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby slsplease » Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:16 pm

VasaVasori - wow thank you so much for the detailed response!

Beyond the Powerscore Bibles, doesn't the class have many more practice problems? If I'm down to only 14 PTs after doing the LRB and LGB, could going through the class effectively kill nearly all of my PT opportunities? If so maybe I should just do the bibles and then focus on PTs instead of drills?

User avatar
Elston Gunn
Posts: 3444
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:09 pm

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby Elston Gunn » Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:24 pm

People worry way way too much about "compromising" practice tests. The purpose of PTs is not to know exactly how well you're doing, but to get better at the LSAT. 10 or so untainted PTs is plenty to have a good sense of where you're at.

VasaVasori
Posts: 573
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 2:36 pm

.

Postby VasaVasori » Sat Dec 24, 2011 1:20 am

.
Last edited by VasaVasori on Sat May 02, 2015 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Grond
Posts: 255
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 9:33 am

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby Grond » Sat Dec 24, 2011 7:34 pm

FYI: the classes do not use the bibles as textbooks. The information contained in the bibles is a small part of the homework. You'll have 22 practice tests, which is more than you'll need if you do the 4500+ questions in the homework, the additional 45 hours of lecture online, etc.,etc..
Last edited by Grond on Mon Jan 09, 2012 12:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
toddly76
Posts: 63
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:12 am

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby toddly76 » Sun Dec 25, 2011 1:05 pm

I'm torn on the powerscore class, I took one last summer to prepare for the October test. You get a lot of questions to do and a lot of prep material. You are only left with something like 15-20 "virgin" preptests. I was doing them throughout the course of the class and when the class finished and I had six weeks or so to work on my own, I had very few clean preptests to work with.

I took the class and could never get a handle on their games strategies and tended to bypass systematic LR strategies and only worked with my intuition--big mistake. I ended up bombing the October LSAT despite PTing from 169-175 regularly. Ultimately, I took the velocity class and ended up much more confident going into the December LSAT--feel like I did very well.

My only piece of advice is, if you take the powerscore course, make sure to become invested in all the methods and work methodically through all the questions according to their strategies even though it is painfully slow and can be frustrating. I tried too quickly to develop speed and sacrificed my deep core understanding of the material. No matter how smart you are, embrace the strategies and tactics, don't rely on your intuition. I'd take the class as early as possible, do all the homework, and then set aside the most recent 30 preptests to do under timed and untimed conditions, concentrating on employing methods for each question type. Even if you've seen the questions before, there's no guarantee you remember the correct answer, especially for the very difficult questions. If you can't get a handle on their games strategies, I wholeheartedly recommend velocity. The powerscore strategies deal more with finding inferences and meta-rules that inform the games, but if you aren't good at doing that, Velocity provides a very intuitive, much more simplistic set of strategies which allow for a much more systematic catalog of past work and checking against it--it forces you to be systematized and organized. Again, powerscore is excellent for games especially and most people on here love it and work very well, just didn't work for me. Though I think I gained quite a bit from the class.

slsplease
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:03 pm

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby slsplease » Sun Dec 25, 2011 3:59 pm

thanks toddly I feel like I'm in exactly the same position as you were... I'm pretty strong at LR to begin but it seems like I should be focusing on learning to identify question types and strategies even if I already have a feeling what the answer is most of the time (I do).

Do you use conditional reasoning as often as the Powerscore bible tells you to? Is that part of what you are talking about by a systematic approach?

User avatar
toddly76
Posts: 63
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:12 am

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby toddly76 » Sun Dec 25, 2011 4:32 pm

Yeah, I try to use conditional diagramming wherever I see if and then, or all X are Y (formal logic), as in 80% of those questions the conditional logic has bearing on the credited answer. It's more disciplining yourself to follow all the steps for eliminating wrong answers on different question types. Also applying all the ways to strengthen and weaken causal arguments and recognizing particular flaws and how to address them (this takes a lot of memorization and forcing yourself to go slow). Going through, with confidence, the steps to eliminate answer choices on Parallel questions, negating necessary assumption questions, etc.

The problem is that, after you've done a lot of problems, you get really good at intuitively recognizing the correct answers for most of them. To get an elite score, however, you need to find the right answer for very difficult, long, complicated problems. Forcing yourself to recognize the patterns in LR and breaking down, simplifying, and applying techniques is the key to doing this and you have to get in the habit of doing it with all questions. It's very frustrating to force yourself to do especially you're pretty smart. This is especially true with games too. Just takes a lot of work and a lot of patience.

slsplease
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:03 pm

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby slsplease » Sun Dec 25, 2011 6:14 pm

would you say all those techniques are covered in the LRB?

User avatar
toddly76
Posts: 63
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:12 am

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby toddly76 » Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:14 pm

I can't speak to the LRB as I didn't use the Powerscore Bibles to study, I used the material that came with the class. In hindsight, powerscore did a good job of presenting those techniques, but it wasn't until I took the powerscore online class that I really began to appreciate the specific methods and patterns that really simplify LR questions.

User avatar
LexLeon
Posts: 400
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 11:03 pm

Re: Planning to take Powerscore class, but what about PTs?

Postby LexLeon » Sun Jan 08, 2012 11:30 pm

You'll want to leave a few of the most recent tests untouched in order to assess your capabilities when October draws near.

However it otherwise doesn't matter much that you'll already have seen some of the problems in several of your practice tests along the way. After all, you're taking these primarily to practice; and several of the highest scorers you'll find posts from on TLS recommend doing games 3 or more times, or redoing LR and RC to gain greater familiarity with the mechanics of the test. I recommend this as well.

TLS1776, who scored a 180, writes:

"If we’re talking about the number of times I did 4 or more sections in a row (where “in a row” includes 5 or 8 section tests with a 10 minute break after section 3 or 4 respectively): the answer is 56. The 37 tests listed above plus the 19 I retook leading up to the test." (Emphasis added)

"The biggest lesson I got from this book was the importance of seeing the LSAT as testing pattern recognition. The guy who wrote this article got better at chess by exposing himself to so many chess puzzles that his brain automatically absorbed the patterns found in the game. He could look at a new chess problem and quickly see the necessary move because he had exposed himself to so many prior problems. Similarly, on the LSAT you can follow the same strategy by trying to submerge yourself in the material, exposing yourself to every available PT and then running through them all again. I would just advise, if you're going to be running through material several times, that you always run through the thought process necessary to get the correct answer. Don't just look at the question, think to yourself, "Ah, the answer is 'A' in this one", and move on. (Emphasis added)

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=120471




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests