LG and pressure

6lehderjets
Posts: 226
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2011 11:01 pm

LG and pressure

Postby 6lehderjets » Thu Oct 13, 2011 12:18 pm

Here's the rundown...

I'm proficient in logic games, I have gone through the LGB and done a variety of games multiple times and I feel like I have a solid grasp on LG. However, during the real LSAT when the LG came around I choked!

It seems pretty apparent that the realness is a stumbling block I have and I realize outside of taking the LSAT there's nothing that can exactly replicate that type of pressure. But does anyone have any advice on how I could up the pressure of games a little more during my prep. I was thinking about doing 30 minute sections for LG but I would curious if anyone else had any other suggestions? And if anyone has experienced what happened to me any advice on how you overcame it would be appreciated.

Thanks!

LawSchoolGuru
Posts: 53
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 11:56 am

Re: LG and pressure

Postby LawSchoolGuru » Thu Oct 13, 2011 12:20 pm

it all comes down to test day confidence. that can happen on any section... as for my strategy: Drill, baby Drill!

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tehrocstar
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 10:12 am

Re: LG and pressure

Postby tehrocstar » Thu Oct 13, 2011 1:25 pm

Perhaps try visualization:
http://www.gmatpill.com/about/studying- ... trategies/

Also you want to master a calm intensity, think Roger Federer in Tennis. Keeping a cool and clear head, but focused under pressure.

Lastly, expect to be nervous or anxious, it just means you wan to do well.

As for technical aspect....Pithypike method?

Fairy24
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 8:24 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby Fairy24 » Sat Oct 15, 2011 5:14 pm

Practice practice practice. There really isn't anything you can do to simulate the amount of pressure there is on test day. I bombed LG on my first LSAT, but on my second one I prepped myself by practicing until I could do all four games with time to spare, and that helped me build up confidence to know I could do it on test day. And you have to come up with a plan b if something goes wrong. For example, in practice I would go -0 with minutes to spare, but on test day (Oct) there was one question that stumped me and I started to panic. When I realized this I told myself, "No. Don't panic. Skip and return to it later." So I did and of course I have not received my score yet, but I finished in time and probably missed that one question, but hey, I'm human. :)

You just have to believe in yourself. I know it sounds cheesy, but it is so true.

Seneca
Posts: 142
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:00 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby Seneca » Sat Oct 15, 2011 7:44 pm

I think it would help to try to get your LG section in under 30 minutes under your practicing conditions. There's no guarantee you won't have the same problem on test day, but you'll have built up more speed and have some confidence that you may have at least a minute or two of "extra" time built in to game you're having trouble with. I also considered every possible situation I could imagine going wrong during a game, from realizing I mis-bubbled a game to messing up on timing and having only a couple minutes left for an entire game, and planned what I would do if I had that problem (would I try to set up the game, would I skip straight to the questions, etc), and knowing I was ready for everything, even if only in theory, really helped cut down on test day stress.

Mostly, though, you need to have fun with it, as much as you can. I really liked prepping for the LSAT, and on test day I thought to myself that this would be the last LSAT I'd ever take, and I should "enjoy" it, as strange as that sounds. It helped keep my focus and energy up throughout. I hope you find what works for you, and good luck!

CodyRuegger
Posts: 58
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 11:12 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby CodyRuegger » Sun Oct 16, 2011 2:34 am

Seek out the toughest logic game sections in the practice tests: there have been some real curveballs in the more recent years, like the toy dinosaurs and stained glass game. You're probably fine on most games, but you have to be ready for a boss battle at any time.

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3v3ryth1ng
Posts: 295
Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby 3v3ryth1ng » Sun Oct 16, 2011 8:57 pm

6lehderjets wrote:Here's the rundown...

I'm proficient in logic games, I have gone through the LGB and done a variety of games multiple times and I feel like I have a solid grasp on LG. However, during the real LSAT when the LG came around I choked!

It seems pretty apparent that the realness is a stumbling block I have and I realize outside of taking the LSAT there's nothing that can exactly replicate that type of pressure. But does anyone have any advice on how I could up the pressure of games a little more during my prep. I was thinking about doing 30 minute sections for LG but I would curious if anyone else had any other suggestions? And if anyone has experienced what happened to me any advice on how you overcame it would be appreciated.

Thanks!


The conventional wisdom is that you should do what you must to feel calm and confident, which mostly comes from experience and knowing that you can handle any conditions the LSAT throws at you.

However, I think it's useful to have a good emergency "machete-to-the-face" strategy for those games that you just can't crack. A good example where this was useful for me was on the stained glass game, where I quickly realized that I wasn't going to make any huge deductions (if there were any, I just wasn't seeing them), so I just "hacked" away at a few crucial hypotheticals. They didn't answer every possible question, but I was able to answer most of the questions that came up. In the end, that game took me about 9 minutes and I didn't miss any. It's not pretty, but it's great for those games that make you think "oh shit!"

I also used it on the bicycle game (on the actual LSAT) that everyone hated. I tried for about a minute to crack it (usually the best option for me), but it just wasn't coming. So I pwned that game with a machete to the face by quickly drilling out some hypothetical scenarios. It took me about 8 minutes, but I took an extra minute to double check my answers, so 9 minutes. Again, it's not pretty or ideal, but when shit hits the fan, it's good to have a fallback strategy you execute when your nerves are running on high. That's what I got; take it or leave it :P

d0nk
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 6:06 am

Re: LG and pressure

Postby d0nk » Sun Oct 16, 2011 9:23 pm

You could try practicing LG sections under 30 minute constraints - this might induce your anxiety mechanism and allow you to practice logic games under additional pressure.

The real question you need to answer is whether
A) Do you have an actual underlying anxiety disorder that is causing your emotional state? If so, you should get that addressed with a psychiatrist asap.
B) Are you actually as proficient in each type of game as you could possibly be?

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thelawyler
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Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:00 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby thelawyler » Sun Oct 16, 2011 10:22 pm

Easy steps to stimulate pressure in practice:

1)Determine the average amount you get wrong on the LG section. Lets say it is -2.

2) Go to local coffee shop or library.

3) Now place a large monetary wager based on your average. A couple of hundred bucks will usually do. If you hit the average, it's a break even. If you score better than average, you win your wager + 80% more of what you put up. If you score lower, you lose 100% of your wager.

4) Repeat steps 1 and 2 over and over until the pressure no longer exists.

Key points: The person you are wagering against is the proctor so you have somebody who wants you to fail "watching." This can somewhat stimulate weird or strange circumstances in the testing center. Also, make sure the person you are wagering against holds all the cash. That way you can't just be like "This one didn't count because of X, Y, Z." This could simulate a legitimate freak-out that you might experience during the real LSAT.

And the reason you get 80% back if you win is so deep down you know that the long-term Expected Value is not break-even and that you must slightly over-perform in order for you to see a profit with it. Also, if you can manage to find somebody to wager with you, as long as you show them convincing data of what your LG average really is, they should be willing to do it with you. After all, their long-term expected value is positive if the simulation is ran many times. Add in the fact that you choke under pressure, they have an even higher EV.

Let me know how it goes.

And bit more seriously (not that my advice isn't serious... as it kind of is), most people under perform a little bit on the LSAT compared to their PTs.

6lehderjets
Posts: 226
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2011 11:01 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby 6lehderjets » Mon Oct 17, 2011 1:27 am

Thanks for the advice everyone! Some very helpful and encouraging posts. The common element of advice I have taken away is to have a game plan for the unexpected when you run into a game/question that totally stumps you. The expect the best but prepare for the worst approach.

I think what part of my problem was I became really infatuated with the PS chapter of identifying the possibilities and when I was able to do it during a couple of games I fell in love with it to the point where I wanted to outsmart every game. In theory that makes sense but in reality the goal is to just do the 4 games successfully within the 35 minutes, I had lost sense of that.

So now I am going to be nailing down some of the most difficult games in recent LSATs which tend to be multi-row grouping games. (Photographer's assistants and writer's assistants in 3 cities, mannequins, etc.) I can't remember at the moment which PT those games come from. Also, I am going to try to slow down just a touch. During the LSAT when I was on the third question on the bicycle game I realized I had diagrammed a rule wrong and just panicked. Definitely the wrong thing to do because correcting my mistake would have just cost me another minute but hindsight is 20/20.

From now till December I think my approach for LG will be eliminating my weaknesses and drilling LG sections with the intent to spend a moment on making deductions but mostly let my pencil do the work. Rather than trying to outsmart the games.

Fairy24
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 8:24 pm

Re: LG and pressure

Postby Fairy24 » Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:03 pm

6lehderjets wrote:Thanks for the advice everyone! Some very helpful and encouraging posts. The common element of advice I have taken away is to have a game plan for the unexpected when you run into a game/question that totally stumps you. The expect the best but prepare for the worst approach.

I think what part of my problem was I became really infatuated with the PS chapter of identifying the possibilities and when I was able to do it during a couple of games I fell in love with it to the point where I wanted to outsmart every game. In theory that makes sense but in reality the goal is to just do the 4 games successfully within the 35 minutes, I had lost sense of that.

So now I am going to be nailing down some of the most difficult games in recent LSATs which tend to be multi-row grouping games. (Photographer's assistants and writer's assistants in 3 cities, mannequins, etc.) I can't remember at the moment which PT those games come from. Also, I am going to try to slow down just a touch. During the LSAT when I was on the third question on the bicycle game I realized I had diagrammed a rule wrong and just panicked. Definitely the wrong thing to do because correcting my mistake would have just cost me another minute but hindsight is 20/20.

From now till December I think my approach for LG will be eliminating my weaknesses and drilling LG sections with the intent to spend a moment on making deductions but mostly let my pencil do the work. Rather than trying to outsmart the games.


Yes, it is a great feeling to be able to successfully identify the possibilities in a game, but as you know, many real LGs don't allow for that to be done in an efficient, timely manner. :( But your approach sounds really good! You can do it! :)




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