What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

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tehrocstar
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What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby tehrocstar » Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:42 am

So while drilling logic games I came across this rule:

"J drives on Wednesday or Saturday or both, and he may also drive on other days"

I interpreted this as J can drive on ALL days of the week. I knew that this was clearly wrong, but couldn't figure out what the rule meant until after the game.

I know that in time I'll get used to the way that rules are worded, and that this issue is less likely to happen on test day.

However, say that I DO encounter a rule that I have a hard time interpreting on test day? I tried to create a general rule for myself on what I should do, but not really sure what should be the correct course of action. Should I just leave the rule uninterpreted? skip the game? Thoughts?

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Tiago Splitter
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby Tiago Splitter » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:18 am

Unless there is another rule that prevents J from driving on other days, there aren't any limitations. He just has to drive on Wednesday or Saturday.

msuz
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby msuz » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:23 am

I would skip the game, finish all of the others, then come back to this one with a fresh set of eyes. Answer the questions you can, see if you can make any further deductions, and hopefully eventually the implications of the rule set in. Main point is if your nightmare scenario happens, try to get as many points as possible by owning the rest of the games and taking your time on what you know for the last one, instead of rushing through the easy ones and making stupid mistakes because you are nervous about one hard rule.

Hopefully though, you are so familiar with LG by test day that no rules seem that foreign or difficult to you.

msuz
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby msuz » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:27 am

That also might be a good question to ask this guy

Nixon
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby Nixon » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:31 am

tehrocstar wrote:So while drilling logic games I came across this rule:

"J drives on Wednesday or Saturday or both, and he may also drive on other days"

I interpreted this as J can drive on ALL days of the week. I knew that this was clearly wrong, but couldn't figure out what the rule meant until after the game.

I know that in time I'll get used to the way that rules are worded, and that this issue is less likely to happen on test day.

However, say that I DO encounter a rule that I have a hard time interpreting on test day? I tried to create a general rule for myself on what I should do, but not really sure what should be the correct course of action. Should I just leave the rule uninterpreted? skip the game? Thoughts?



I'm really curious about this too. I think thats part of why I didnt do too well last time I took it. And it happens a lot in practice tests. Basically I freeze up. What you think?

lkplkp
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby lkplkp » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:46 am

I just wrote in October and games were definitely my strongest section. However, misinterpreting rules was one of the major things I struggled with while learning to get better. I found that if I took an extra few seconds to read the rules closely and slowly, that helped. Also, once I read and rewrote the rule (in symbols) I would check off the rule that I had covered and put a number by it. What I mean is I would put a 1 by the first rule, 2 by the second, and so on... and then I would just put a little "1" by my symbol version of the rule. I found this really helped cause if I would be going through a rule and quickly needed to reference the full rule I could quickly correspond to its matching number. By checking the rules off that also gave me confirmation that I had not missed a rule. Good Luck!

Seneca
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby Seneca » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:59 am

That's where things can pretty critically come down to rule notation during the test (if you do that kind of thing). J drives on at least one of W or S. It's the slight different between "J can drive on ANY day of the week" and "J can drive on ALL days of the week" - the second may also be true, but the first is always true, as you approach subsequent rules and hypos.

Here's what I would do if you find yourself in that situation:
1) Triage - QUICKLY determine the damage and decide how much time, if any, you can afford to spend rectifying the problem. Consider: What kind of game is this - is it (typically) your strong suit, can a single set up answer most of the questions, are there too many hypos to handle right now?

2) Either move on or stick with it. This decision has to be made in 5-10 seconds, tops. You can't turn any game into a time sink.

IF YOU MOVE ON: Short memory. Tackle the next game, kill it, come back.

IF YOU STICK WITH IT: If you've got time to spare, go back and start over with each Q, applying the correct interpretation. OR, if you don't have the time or you've already answered most of the questions, look through for specific hypos where you think this rule would affect the answer, (unfortunately, this is probably most all of the qs - each rule is critical to game play), take the easy ones, and move on. No heroics here. Come back if you can.

It's a good idea to anticipate these kinds of issues, even if you've prepped thoroughly. The unexpected easily happens on test day. I had a slight rule fumble on the third game (a long one, that should have been fairly simple) in June. I was prepared and it shouldn't have happened, but I skipped onto the fourth (an easy solve), had more than enough time to go back and fix the third, and still went -0. LG was always my strongest section, and I'm kind of shocked I had a near-miss like that on the test, but I credit my recovery, in large part, to anticipating those kinds of situations as part of my prep.

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Jeffort
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby Jeffort » Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:59 pm

tehrocstar wrote:So while drilling logic games I came across this rule:

"J drives on Wednesday or Saturday or both, and he may also drive on other days"

I interpreted this as J can drive on ALL days of the week. I knew that this was clearly wrong, but couldn't figure out what the rule meant until after the game.

I know that in time I'll get used to the way that rules are worded, and that this issue is less likely to happen on test day.

However, say that I DO encounter a rule that I have a hard time interpreting on test day? I tried to create a general rule for myself on what I should do, but not really sure what should be the correct course of action. Should I just leave the rule uninterpreted? skip the game? Thoughts?


You didn't misinterpret the text of that particular rule. Your mistake is that you didn't put it into context and analyze how it interacts with the other rules of the game before jumping into trying to solve the questions.

(The rule is from game #3 in PT#15, June 1995)

To perform well on the LG section and be able to solve the questions efficiently it is important to spend a little time analyzing how the conditions interact with each other in order to make the proper deductions that narrow things down BEFORE rushing into the questions. Doing that helps you see the big picture of how the game operates and makes solving the questions much easier even if you don't determine every possible deduction that can be made.

If you understand the main controlling factors and the basics of how they interact/function together, solving the questions requires far less time and effort in terms of brute force trial and error hypotheticals. Part of the set-up analysis entails identifying which types of logical concepts/relationships the game is based on so that you know the important factors to focus on (sequencing, grouping, numerical distribution, variable sets parameters, etc.)

This one is a sequencing game that heavily revolves around numerical distribution.

J cannot drive on all days because the first indented rule dictates that each of the four people must drive on at least one day, therefore you have four variables to distribute into the six weekdays. There is no stated limitation on how many days a person can drive, but with simple math you can deduct that nobody can drive more than three days since each of the four has to drive at least once.

The few pieces of Dave Hall LG strategy advice I've read here and listened to in some of his free youtube videos appears to be about the same as what The Princeton Review LSAT classes and books have been advocating for years. It's something like 'Don't worry too much about the set-up and deductions up front, jump right into the questions and fight it out with brute force'. That strategy is great if you can bust out and fit on the page tons of hypotheticals in the time allotted, but it is inefficient, frustrating and tiring.

An extra minute or two spent on the setup putting things together can lead to being able to fly through the questions rapidly without having to do many trial and error brute force hypos. The infamous mauve dinosaur game is one of many recent examples where creating a good set-up based largely on numerical distribution before rushing into the questions makes a huge difference on how you perform and how much time you spend solving the questions.

.

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Dr. Filth
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby Dr. Filth » Wed Oct 12, 2011 4:24 pm

I totally did this on the June test. I answered every question except the last one, and I just couldn't make the rules fit any of the answer choices. That's when I realized I screwed up a rule. I wrote a if a then not b as a if a then b. I didn't panic and went back and ended up only missing one on that game. The key for me was being familiar with logic games to where I usually have at least 5 minutes left in a section. I did have a bit of extra time that allowed me to go back and work the game one more time. This allows time for mental flubs. I know that's not helpful advice, but I figured I would share.

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tehrocstar
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Re: What to do when you know you've misinterpreted a rule (LG)

Postby tehrocstar » Thu Oct 13, 2011 1:34 pm

thanks everyone (esp seneca + jeffort), helpful stuff, I know generally what I want to do now.




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