Distinguishing must be true & most strongly supports

6lehderjets
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Distinguishing must be true & most strongly supports

Postby 6lehderjets » Mon Oct 10, 2011 11:11 pm

PS does not separate inference questions into must be true and most strongly supports (note: I am referring inference questions when I say most strongly supports and not strengthen questions). However, I have seen other companies differentiate the two question stems. I tend to miss 2-3 inference questions between the two LR sections on my practice tests so I was curious to as if tweaking my strategy based on must be true and most strongly supports questions could be the solution. Anyone have any tips or suggestions on this?

Thanks in advance.

mushybrain
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Re: Distinguishing must be true & most strongly supports

Postby mushybrain » Mon Oct 10, 2011 11:28 pm

http://www.top-law-schools.com/must-be-true.html

"Most strongly supports" = most likely true (and more likely than the other choices)

I approach both in the same way, but "must be true" questions are more likely to be something you can diagram like a logic game setup.

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Re: Distinguishing must be true & most strongly supports

Postby LSAT Blog » Tue Oct 11, 2011 12:00 am


bp shinners
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Re: Distinguishing must be true & most strongly supports

Postby bp shinners » Tue Oct 11, 2011 12:47 pm

We call most strongly supports, or any inference-type question that qualifies the wording with a 'most' or a 'best', as a Soft Must be True question.

You're still looking for something that is very, very likely to be true. However, there is the possibility that it is not true. Usually, to explain how it could not be true, you have to outline an unlikely series of events. When you find yourself bending over backwards to throw out an answer choice to a Soft Must Be True question, it's usually the right answer.

Sometimes, the answer would also be correct for a Must Be True question.

The reason it's important to distinguish (aside from the requirements being a little 'softer' for a right answer) is that you'll approach the stimulus in a slightly different manner. For a Must Be True question, you should assume that it's as likely as not that you'll be diagramming. For a Soft Must Be True question, there's a much smaller chance that you'll be diagramming (somewhere around 10%). Most of those diagrammable Soft Must Be True questions are Soft Must Be True Principle questions (it will, generally, say 'principle' in the prompt), where you'll be given two rules in the stimulus and need to determine which situation (one given in each answer choice) conforms to the rules given.

6lehderjets
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Re: Distinguishing must be true & most strongly supports

Postby 6lehderjets » Tue Oct 11, 2011 2:30 pm

All right I will try to diagram the must be true if its appropriate based on the stimulus. I had been occasionally diagramming on inference questions but I had not seen that distinction that most strongly supported are less likely to be diagrammed. Thanks for the help and links guys.




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