Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

superhedy2011
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:33 am

Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby superhedy2011 » Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:36 pm

I'm a test taker from China, with a native language of Chinese.

As I go through the forum, I found that the most discussion are about LR and LG, and seems RC is quite easy... But for me, Reading is the biggest headache, not only in RC section, but also in LR section. I really enjoy the reasoning with LR problems, but understanding the stimulus/stem and answer choices usually takes a lot of time. And not to mention reading.... it's my nightmare...

But LG for me is quite easy. So if there's someone whose native language is not English, and has the same problem with me, we can share our experiences and hope to find out a feasible solution together.

User avatar
ColumbiaChamp
Posts: 185
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 12:01 pm

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby ColumbiaChamp » Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:59 pm

you and me both, my RC is the most unpredictable section - I have done anywhere from -1 to -8 on my PTs. I think the best strategy is to slow down and read it at your own pace so you grasp everything before moving on to the questions.

User avatar
naillsat
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:48 pm

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby naillsat » Mon Oct 10, 2011 12:35 am

hello OP. you are not alone - I am from China, too, but i have been studying in the US for a little over 7 years. So reading is not my major obstacle anymore.

I found LR is my weakest, but i have been drilling each type of LR questions, this helps a lot. RC is not that terrible - miss anywhere below 5 each section. the LSAT RC passages are so organized that i consider it a pleasure to learn the argument and counter arguments. Practice is the key. Good luck! :P

User avatar
ss3825
Posts: 59
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2011 5:56 pm

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby ss3825 » Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:18 am

superhedy2011 wrote:I'm a test taker from China, with a native language of Chinese.

As I go through the forum, I found that the most discussion are about LR and LG, and seems RC is quite easy... But for me, Reading is the biggest headache, not only in RC section, but also in LR section. I really enjoy the reasoning with LR problems, but understanding the stimulus/stem and answer choices usually takes a lot of time. And not to mention reading.... it's my nightmare...

But LG for me is quite easy. So if there's someone whose native language is not English, and has the same problem with me, we can share our experiences and hope to find out a feasible solution together.


I am a non native english speaker as well and RC has been my biggest problem. I especially have trouble with timing and used to get A LOT of answers wrong but recently have reduced incorrect answers to below 6. I found that this came with practice. As you do a lot of RC passages, you will be familiar with the structure and know while reading which parts are important and which are not. This is usually very important in answering the questions. I also read the Manhattan RC book and found it to be useful since it helped me look at the passages in a different way. So, IMO, the key to doing well in RC is practice since with practice, you will be familiar with the structure of passages which is key to doing well.

Similarly with LR, read the Powerscore LR Bible and practice each question by type. This is useful because it will get you familiar with the questions and increase your speed in the process. 1 major problem I have had is with vocabulary since my vocabulary is quite bad. It can be overcome to an extent since structure in LR and RC are so important.

In conclusion, I found that practice helped me overcome the 'language barrier' difficulty although still not well enough in RC since I am still not doing as well as I want to.

User avatar
Nulli Secundus
Posts: 2625
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 7:19 am

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby Nulli Secundus » Mon Oct 10, 2011 4:01 am

Non-native speaker here.

If RC is your biggest problem, the best solution is (US Surgeon General's Warning: The absolute brilliance of this solution can cause severe inferiority complex for not having thought about it first) to read a lot. Spend all waking moments of your life during which you have at least one hand free reading something in English, that is what I did. HTH.

superhedy2011
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:33 am

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby superhedy2011 » Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:54 am

Thanks a lot for your experience sharing, it did encourage a lot. After practising for a month with very limited progress, while still has a lot of wrong answers (more than 10), almost beat me up...

But your experience is quite a good example for me, and how long have it taken to get the wrong answers below 6 for RC?

ss3825 wrote:
superhedy2011 wrote:I'm a test taker from China, with a native language of Chinese.

As I go through the forum, I found that the most discussion are about LR and LG, and seems RC is quite easy... But for me, Reading is the biggest headache, not only in RC section, but also in LR section. I really enjoy the reasoning with LR problems, but understanding the stimulus/stem and answer choices usually takes a lot of time. And not to mention reading.... it's my nightmare...

But LG for me is quite easy. So if there's someone whose native language is not English, and has the same problem with me, we can share our experiences and hope to find out a feasible solution together.


I am a non native english speaker as well and RC has been my biggest problem. I especially have trouble with timing and used to get A LOT of answers wrong but recently have reduced incorrect answers to below 6. I found that this came with practice. As you do a lot of RC passages, you will be familiar with the structure and know while reading which parts are important and which are not. This is usually very important in answering the questions. I also read the Manhattan RC book and found it to be useful since it helped me look at the passages in a different way. So, IMO, the key to doing well in RC is practice since with practice, you will be familiar with the structure of passages which is key to doing well.

Similarly with LR, read the Powerscore LR Bible and practice each question by type. This is useful because it will get you familiar with the questions and increase your speed in the process. 1 major problem I have had is with vocabulary since my vocabulary is quite bad. It can be overcome to an extent since structure in LR and RC are so important.

In conclusion, I found that practice helped me overcome the 'language barrier' difficulty although still not well enough in RC since I am still not doing as well as I want to.

superhedy2011
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:33 am

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby superhedy2011 » Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:00 am

Wow... I feel the big firm resolution here.

What are you reading about? Newspapers? Novels? Are you skimming to get a general idea or reading very carefully? How will you do with the new words?


Nulli Secundus wrote:Non-native speaker here.

If RC is your biggest problem, the best solution is (US Surgeon General's Warning: The absolute brilliance of this solution can cause severe inferiority complex for not having thought about it first) to read a lot. Spend all waking moments of your life during which you have at least one hand free reading something in English, that is what I did. HTH.

superhedy2011
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:33 am

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby superhedy2011 » Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:06 am

Thanks! Good luck with you too!

I can also reach below 5 when time is unlimited, but when restricted to 35 minutes... it's horrible.

Are you a science student or art student? How do you find the passages about humanities in LSAT?

naillsat wrote:hello OP. you are not alone - I am from China, too, but i have been studying in the US for a little over 7 years. So reading is not my major obstacle anymore.

I found LR is my weakest, but i have been drilling each type of LR questions, this helps a lot. RC is not that terrible - miss anywhere below 5 each section. the LSAT RC passages are so organized that i consider it a pleasure to learn the argument and counter arguments. Practice is the key. Good luck! :P

User avatar
IamIn
Posts: 202
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 1:04 pm

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby IamIn » Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:37 am

I am not a native speaker and I've been living in US and speaking English for almost three years. RC is the biggest challenge for me, too. But I think I've become much better after I did all the RC passages ever released at least twice. I will know for sure after Oct. scores are out...

User avatar
Nulli Secundus
Posts: 2625
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 7:19 am

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby Nulli Secundus » Mon Oct 10, 2011 11:50 am

superhedy2011 wrote:Wow... I feel the big firm resolution here.

What are you reading about? Newspapers? Novels? Are you skimming to get a general idea or reading very carefully? How will you do with the new words?


Nulli Secundus wrote:Non-native speaker here.

If RC is your biggest problem, the best solution is (US Surgeon General's Warning: The absolute brilliance of this solution can cause severe inferiority complex for not having thought about it first) to read a lot. Spend all waking moments of your life during which you have at least one hand free reading something in English, that is what I did. HTH.


Time & Newsweek & Economist & Scientific American

And novels of any kind if you want, but mainly the last 2 of the above 4.

Of those two options, I guess I read carefully, both because I actually choose things I am at least somewhat interested in to read and also reading the entirety of articles gives you a good feel about how competent English writers develop their ideas and how the arguments usually progress, which are, I guess, useful for LSAT. As for new words, I very rarely utilize a dictionary, I try to understand the meaning of the word from the context. I find this useful because chances are the word in question is a good one and well-used, allowing your brain to make a firm connection between that particular context and that word is useful for your later writing efforts. I do get some words wrong, but nothing catastrophic happened so far. (Like, the first time I saw the word "casualty" context indicated it meant only the dead people, therefore that is how I learned it, I noticed much later that the word also covers the wounded.)
Last edited by Nulli Secundus on Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
ss3825
Posts: 59
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2011 5:56 pm

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby ss3825 » Mon Oct 10, 2011 1:53 pm

superhedy2011 wrote:Thanks a lot for your experience sharing, it did encourage a lot. After practising for a month with very limited progress, while still has a lot of wrong answers (more than 10), almost beat me up...

But your experience is quite a good example for me, and how long have it taken to get the wrong answers below 6 for RC?


I would say it took me around a month with rigorous practice. I think the key to improving in RC is to have a positive attitude and actually believe that you can improve in RC. Don't make excuses to yourself and be determined to improve in it no matter what. People around me said that, 'you can be either good in RC or bad in it' but I was determined to improve and practiced a lot and tried every method I could find in the internet and in books. Even though I am still not good enough in RC, the initial improvement I had has given me encouragement to improve further.
With the LR, I am currently reading the LRB for a second time and drilling questions by type slowly for a second time. I am hoping this will improve my accuracy further.

Check out Kurst's reply from this thread. It has a lot of information about RC in TLS
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=127185

This is Dave Hall's drilling method
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=161914&start=150

Some more drilling practices.
http://blueprintprep.com/lsatblog/readi ... rehension/

I hope this will be helpful to you and help you improve your score. Good Luck!

Also, mix and match various methods and figure out what is the best method for you. That is very important. You should not follow a particular method blindly. Make sure it is the most efficient method for you.

superhedy2011
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:33 am

Re: Is any LSAT taker whose native language is not English?

Postby superhedy2011 » Mon Oct 10, 2011 9:15 pm

Thank all of you for the nice sharing, it really helps!

Good luck with you all!

ss3825 wrote:
superhedy2011 wrote:Thanks a lot for your experience sharing, it did encourage a lot. After practising for a month with very limited progress, while still has a lot of wrong answers (more than 10), almost beat me up...

But your experience is quite a good example for me, and how long have it taken to get the wrong answers below 6 for RC?


I would say it took me around a month with rigorous practice. I think the key to improving in RC is to have a positive attitude and actually believe that you can improve in RC. Don't make excuses to yourself and be determined to improve in it no matter what. People around me said that, 'you can be either good in RC or bad in it' but I was determined to improve and practiced a lot and tried every method I could find in the internet and in books. Even though I am still not good enough in RC, the initial improvement I had has given me encouragement to improve further.
With the LR, I am currently reading the LRB for a second time and drilling questions by type slowly for a second time. I am hoping this will improve my accuracy further.

Check out Kurst's reply from this thread. It has a lot of information about RC in TLS
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=127185

This is Dave Hall's drilling method
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=161914&start=150

Some more drilling practices.
http://blueprintprep.com/lsatblog/readi ... rehension/

I hope this will be helpful to you and help you improve your score. Good Luck!

Also, mix and match various methods and figure out what is the best method for you. That is very important. You should not follow a particular method blindly. Make sure it is the most efficient method for you.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Pozzo and 5 guests