Conditional Reasoning

6lehderjets
Posts: 226
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2011 11:01 pm

Conditional Reasoning

Postby 6lehderjets » Sat Jul 23, 2011 1:16 am

Hello, when it comes to conditional reasoning questions does anyone have an estimate on how many questions with conditional reasoning show up per section in logical reasoning?

I know conditional reasoning is prevalent in must be true questions, are there any other question types conditional reasoning appears in regularly?

Finally, besides looking out for the indicators is there any other tips any of you may have on recognizing conditional reasoning exists in a stimulus?

Thanks in advance.

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Sloth Hero
Posts: 233
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 2:32 pm

Re: Conditional Reasoning

Postby Sloth Hero » Sat Jul 23, 2011 1:41 am

I mean, all argumentation is essentially conditional reasoning -- but that's metatheory.

But the key words you want to look out for is obviously "if, the, unless, only, only if, if and only if, whenever" etc.

And for quantified conditional reasoning keep an eye out for "All, None, Some, Not all, most, often" etc.

Get the LRB. :)

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Jeffort
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Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: Conditional Reasoning

Postby Jeffort » Sat Jul 23, 2011 10:53 am

6lehderjets wrote:Hello, when it comes to conditional reasoning questions does anyone have an estimate on how many questions with conditional reasoning show up per section in logical reasoning?

I know conditional reasoning is prevalent in must be true questions, are there any other question types conditional reasoning appears in regularly?

Finally, besides looking out for the indicators is there any other tips any of you may have on recognizing conditional reasoning exists in a stimulus?

Thanks in advance.


The number varies and floats around 7-11 total per test (counting both LR sections) in terms of LR questions with premises/conclusions/answer choices you can cleanly and accurately diagram using Image Image Image notation of the logical relationships in order to see it clearly to solve the question more easily/with certainty.

The overwhelming majority of them are must be true, justify the conclusion (aka sufficient assumption), parallel reasoning and principle question types. It also pops up in describe the flawed method of reasoning questions and occasionally (though much less often) in strengthen questions. Sometimes clear cut/obvious conditional statements appear as a time waster distraction thing in main point and argument structure (role of XyZ part) questions. It's a distraction in those because you don't typically need to diagram in order to differentiate premises from conclusions and sub-conclusions but you can get sucked into wasting time doing it before reading the question stem and knowing what approach to take with the question.

Necessary assumption questions are by definition conditional logic based but not typically ones that diagramming helps with in an A Image B Image C, therefore A Image C or whatever diagramming way.




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