PowerScore Bible's

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Storm
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PowerScore Bible's

Postby Storm » Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:32 pm

Took the June lsat and got a 161 with three weeks of prep (mostly just taking pt's). Just got the LR bible and LG bible and was wondering how much time was needed in each book to make a jump to possibly a 170? I'm planning on taking the October LSAT so I only have this next two and a half months to study.

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EarlCat
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby EarlCat » Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:45 pm

Storm wrote:Took the June lsat and got a 161 with three weeks of prep (mostly just taking pt's). Just got the LR bible and LG bible and was wondering how much time was needed in each book to make a jump to possibly a 170? I'm planning on taking the October LSAT so I only have this next two and a half months to study.


Hopefully a sum total of no more than two and half months.

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loomstate
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby loomstate » Fri Jul 15, 2011 10:55 pm

There is no formula, just hard work at this point.

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Storm
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby Storm » Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:21 am

So how many hours a day do you guys think I should be putting in with the Bibles? Also has anyone found it more beneficial to alternate between the LR and LG bible or to just go straight through them separately?

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Eugenie Danglars
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby Eugenie Danglars » Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:45 am

Storm wrote:So how many hours a day do you guys think I should be putting in with the Bibles? Also has anyone found it more beneficial to alternate between the LR and LG bible or to just go straight through them separately?


I would start with the LG bible. Make sure you actually work through it and don't just read it. Also, I'd suggest making a study schedule (perhaps based on lsatblog's plans). When I was studying for the retake, I used the spreadsheets on lsatblog to do practice LG from the PT's of the type I was studying in the Bible. It helped a lot.

After you get 100% or close to on LG, then start the LR bible. Since you have two and a half months and have taken it before, I think you'll be good with a couple hours a day, possibly more when test day gets closer.

Good luck!

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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby totaltest.milan » Sat Jul 16, 2011 11:25 am

It depends. What were you having problems with? What were your strong areas? How much free time do you have?

Going from a 161 to breaking 170 is more than probable, under the condition that you practice intelligently. The bibles are a good resource - I recommend doing the games one first and then the arguments one. The reason for that is because you learn useful concepts when studying for the games, conditional reasoning in particular, which you can then transfer to the arguments. I structure my courses so that my students learn games first, then arguments, and then reading comprehension (although my games approach is different from the powerscore one).

However, simply doing the bibles isn't going to be enough, you have to do practice tests under timed conditions. The bibles teach you the techniques that you need to use but you need to internalize those techniques. So make sure to incorporate that into your scheduling. Ideally you'll want to have every single published question done by the time you take the test (that's ideal, 75%+ is fine) with half being to practice the techniques and half done as timed tests. Another thing to keep in mind is that not all studying is created equal, if you can only study after work or school when you're tired and not at your optimum, that's not as effective as less time spent studying when you're fresh.

Personally I think 2.5 months isn't ideal, if you're in no rush I would suggest waiting till December, but having said that it all depends on how much time, dedication, ability, etc. you have. Also, you've already taken the test so you probably have a lot of ground covered, which works in your favor.

Check out pithypike's guide for concrete study plans, as well as http://lsat.blogspot.com and my site --LinkRemoved--

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Storm
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby Storm » Sat Jul 16, 2011 5:13 pm

totaltest.milan wrote:It depends. What were you having problems with? What were your strong areas? How much free time do you have?

Going from a 161 to breaking 170 is more than probable, under the condition that you practice intelligently. The bibles are a good resource - I recommend doing the games one first and then the arguments one. The reason for that is because you learn useful concepts when studying for the games, conditional reasoning in particular, which you can then transfer to the arguments. I structure my courses so that my students learn games first, then arguments, and then reading comprehension (although my games approach is different from the powerscore one).

However, simply doing the bibles isn't going to be enough, you have to do practice tests under timed conditions. The bibles teach you the techniques that you need to use but you need to internalize those techniques. So make sure to incorporate that into your scheduling. Ideally you'll want to have every single published question done by the time you take the test (that's ideal, 75%+ is fine) with half being to practice the techniques and half done as timed tests. Another thing to keep in mind is that not all studying is created equal, if you can only study after work or school when you're tired and not at your optimum, that's not as effective as less time spent studying when you're fresh.

Personally I think 2.5 months isn't ideal, if you're in no rush I would suggest waiting till December, but having said that it all depends on how much time, dedication, ability, etc. you have. Also, you've already taken the test so you probably have a lot of ground covered, which works in your favor.

Check out pithypike's guide for concrete study plans, as well as http://lsat.blogspot.com and my site --LinkRemoved--


I have plenty of free time and will be taking a light course load in the fall. However, do you really think it would be that much more advantageous to take it in December as opposed to October? I am just hesitant to be have to wait so long to get in all of my applications.

totaltest.milan
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby totaltest.milan » Sun Jul 17, 2011 5:33 pm

In general you really only want to take this test no more than twice and barring a significant score increase (10+ points) schools will average your scores together. That's why I advise my students to take the test only when they're good and ready. It would be advantageous for you take the test in December if you're not ready by October; but that's kind of a non-answer. Basically consider that you have less than 2.5 months left of which at least a month is going to be spent on just doing preptests. That's 30 tests at a pace of a test a day but that's neither realistic nor recommended, 20-25 tests is more realistic and given how much you've prepared learning the techniques and doing questions in isolation then that might be enough, it's towards the lower end of the range of the number of tests that you would do under test conditions but it could be enough to develop intuition and endurance. Which leaves you with less than 1.5 months to learn and internalize all the techniques. Once again, depending on your starting point, innate abilities, and free time this is certainly possible but in my experience I wouldn't feel comfortable recommending it. So that's all things you should consider. If worst comes to worst you can always postpone the test.

As for taking it in December, if the schools that you're applying to have rolling admission then it's better to take it in October. That being said the LSAT scores are kept for five years so you don't have to apply for the fall of '12. In fact, if there's one thing I consistently advise my students it's that if they're still in college then they MOST DEFINITELY SHOULD NOT GO TO LAW SCHOOL RIGHT AFTER COLLEGE. A lot of students and potential students feel that they don't have much of a plan, but they liked college so they'll go to law school to extend their college experience. Law school is different, and much more expensive. It's a much more serious commitment. What I generally tell people is that they should get a job in the legal field that they want to work in (corporate law firm, public interest, etc) and see if they like the environment, get to know the lawyers and see what their routine is. It might be an eye-opener. And another thing I always say is that going abroad and teaching english when you're fresh out of college is one of the smartest things that they can do. You'll immerse yourself in a new culture, make contacts, learn another language, and a host of a whole bunch of other things (I taught english in Barcelona after school and absolutely loved it). Don't worry the rat race isn't going to go anywhere for a couple of years, and if you do want to continue with the law thing being a couple of years older, knowing another language, having contacts, and all that is definitely an advantage.

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loomstate
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby loomstate » Sun Jul 17, 2011 6:34 pm

I'm actually in a similar position to you OP. I'm sticking with my LSAT Blog schedule plan and also enrolling in a course because my main issue is timing. I'm at 165 (untimed right now with a goal of 172+ for Oct). I'm literally taking 50 minute sections. If I am not testing at the score I want to be testing at by early Sep, I will most likely take in Dec. Hope this helps in someway.

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EarlCat
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby EarlCat » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:54 pm

totaltest.milan wrote:In general you really only want to take this test no more than twice and barring a significant score increase (10+ points) schools will average your scores together.

No they won't. Quit talking out of your butt.

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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby totaltest.milan » Mon Jul 18, 2011 7:54 am

EarlCat wrote:
totaltest.milan wrote:In general you really only want to take this test no more than twice and barring a significant score increase (10+ points) schools will average your scores together.

No they won't. Quit talking out of your butt.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_School_Admission_Test#Multiple_scores
http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2009/12/do-law-schools-.html

Bottom line average scores are not irrelevant, it depends on the school so you might want to check it out.

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EarlCat
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby EarlCat » Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:54 pm

totaltest.milan wrote:
EarlCat wrote:
totaltest.milan wrote:In general you really only want to take this test no more than twice and barring a significant score increase (10+ points) schools will average your scores together.

No they won't. Quit talking out of your butt.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_School_Admission_Test#Multiple_scores
http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2009/12/do-law-schools-.html

Bottom line average scores are not irrelevant, it depends on the school so you might want to check it out.

Nobody said they were irrelevant. But maybe you should read your own sources. Neither indicates that "in general" schools will average, nor does anyone claim that a 10+ point score increase has any effect on whether a school uses the average. Taxprof blog identified only 6 schools that claim to average. Wikipedia only says that "some" use the average score AND if you had actually checked the source your Wikipedia link cites, you would have landed on PowerScore's multiple-scores FAQ, which says, "Since schools now report their students’ highest scores to the ABA, the majority of law schools now consider only an applicant’s highest LSAT, although a small number of schools still consider the average of all scores." This is a far cry from your original claim.

The fact is that the ABA now only requires reporting of the highest LSAT score, which is what US News uses in large part to rank said schools. Since USN rankings are a major factor on admissions decisions, the incentive is to admit students with the highest scores, not the highest average scores.

totaltest.milan
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Re: PowerScore Bible's

Postby totaltest.milan » Tue Jul 19, 2011 8:21 am

Fair enough, reasonable people can disagree. I can see how the way I originally phrased it might lead to confusion.

(read more carefully, I didn't say that 'in general schools will average your scores', I said that in general you shouldn't take the test more than twice)




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