Getting better from natural progression?

The Captain
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Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 9:11 pm

Getting better from natural progression?

Postby The Captain » Wed Jul 13, 2011 9:28 pm

I'm going into my freshman year at the University of Michigan, thinking about a path to law school. I took an online practice LSAT today (first ever test I've even looked at, had no clue what types of questions were on there) and scored a 156. When time comes around to start the law school admissions process I'll definitely be doing lots of prep and more practice, but I was wondering if it makes sense that I'd get better at the test just by aging and through taking my normal college courses? Would my intended major influence that at all? I'm planning on political science.

I know it's probably way too early for me to be thinking about my LSAT, but I couldn't help to be a little curious on how I would do.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: My subscores were -11 on the logic part, -3 on the first analytical reasoning, -5 on the second, and -9 on the reading comprehension.

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Sloth Hero
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby Sloth Hero » Wed Jul 13, 2011 10:27 pm

There's a correlation of high LSAT scores between Math and Economics majors.

I think the reason being that they are very (especially math) analytic.

But anyways, don't major in Math just because you think it might help your LSAT score -- I believe you would be better off majoring in your interests. This way, presumably, you can get 'A's in a more enjoyable fashion, and probably have more time to study for the LSAT.

Worst case scenario is you major in something to help your LSAT score, and the major wrecks your GPA, is not enjoyable, and sucks up your time you could have used studying for LSAT

Luckily for me, I LOVE philosophy, logic (sentential, predicate, modal), and economics. So it works out for me.

But if you love to dance, do that instead.

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Jeffort
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby Jeffort » Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:07 pm

Don't choose your UG major based on the LSAT. Go with whatever major interests you and focus on achieving and maintaining a high GPA. Don't worry about or try to study/prep for the LSAT for a long time, there is no hurry for you to take it anytime soon. Enjoy college life now, worry about the LSAT later.

TMC116
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby TMC116 » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:10 am

Jeffort wrote:Don't choose your UG major based on the LSAT. Go with whatever major interests you and focus on achieving and maintaining a high GPA. Don't worry about or try to study/prep for the LSAT for a long time, there is no hurry for you to take it anytime soon. Enjoy college life now, worry about the LSAT later.


Agreed. You haven't stepped foot into a college classroom yet. Forget about the LSAT for at least 3 years.

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suspicious android
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby suspicious android » Sun Jul 17, 2011 1:53 am

What the hell is with this trend of people asking about advice on taking the LSAT 2-3 years from now? I remember when prepping for 3 months was considered overkill.

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Jeffort
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby Jeffort » Sun Jul 17, 2011 5:04 am

suspicious android wrote:What the hell is with this trend of people asking about advice on taking the LSAT 2-3 years from now? I remember when prepping for 3 months was considered overkill.


Who knows, I'm as confused about it as you.

When I started college I wasn't thinking about prepping for post grad admission tests. I hadn't heard and didn't know the names of the several big tests until at least 2nd year (except for the MCAT, started as bio major cuz Mom wanted me to be a doctor. Chemistry rocked me and changed major to social sciences).

At the beginning I was mainly happy that I got into my UG choice and had liberty to select my focus of study/courses/schedule and that they weren't taking attendance so there was no risk of detention if I somehow couldn't make it to a class. My thoughts involved 'goodbye high school! Hello freedom! Oh crap, wait what? I can get arrested now that I'm 18? crap, I need to check my things and take out some trash, BRB.'

acrossthelake
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby acrossthelake » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:10 pm

I very much doubt you'll get better with age if you're already college age. Just make sure to prep properly when the time comes, and maybe throw in a philosophy logic course between now and then, and forget about it.

bp shinners
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby bp shinners » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:27 pm

suspicious android wrote:What the hell is with this trend of people asking about advice on taking the LSAT 2-3 years from now? I remember when prepping for 3 months was considered overkill.


Probably the legion of articles about how college degrees are the new high school degrees, and if you want to make any sort of money you need an advanced degree, especially a professional one. That, coupled with the horror stories of the market for lawyers (and the fact that most people won't make it as doctors) has lead many to start prepping as soon as they can. The Type A's who would have done just as well prepping for the aforementioned 3 months, anyway :)

And it's not just people 2-3 years out. I field a ton of questions from high school-ers who want to start prepping for law school, and are worried because they don't have time to join debate...

danteamante
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Re: Getting better from natural progression?

Postby danteamante » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:59 pm

If you take college level classes that you enjoy and that push you to develop your reading speed/comprehension, logical reasoning and analytic reasoning skills then you should see "natural" progression in your score as you learn how to think.
Developing good study skills is also a must.
Econ, philosophy, history, and english are all good majors for these skills.
Don't worry about the LSAT just yet, worry about maintaining a high GPA and learning how to study, read, write, and reason at a high level. If you can master these skills then a high LSAt score should follow.




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