a testimony to the power of the good books (ps bibles)

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lrslayer
Posts: 586
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:38 am

a testimony to the power of the good books (ps bibles)

Postby lrslayer » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:57 am

Hi all-
I just took the june lsat and got a dismal score compared to goals on this site (155).
I went into the lsat after only doing the super prep and 3 pts in the 2 weeks leading up to the test.
While waiting, I found this site.
Now I have all the books mentioned in pithypike (sp?) and I am studying my tail off for october.
I can't believe i took the lsat without reading the ps bibles! Its like taking the test BLIND!
I have finished the reasoning bible and have already went from -11 to -2 in LR.. just from reading a damn book!
I can't wait to see what the logic games bible does for me!
Awesomeness! Thanks for all the great advice on here guys,
And i can truly testify to the power of the good books!

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glucose101
Posts: 423
Joined: Sun Mar 29, 2009 12:23 am

Re: a testimony to the power of the good books (ps bibles)

Postby glucose101 » Mon Jul 11, 2011 5:22 pm

LGB will rock your world then. haha

totaltest.milan
Posts: 84
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:45 pm

Re: a testimony to the power of the good books (ps bibles)

Postby totaltest.milan » Mon Jul 11, 2011 7:49 pm

The books are really good and are market leaders for the most part. One thing I never tire of telling my students as well as any potential students is that a big part of doing well on the test is the actual practice that you need to put in. Specifically, you'd ideally need to do every single preptest out there under timed conditions. The books will help by showing you the approach you need to take with each question but it's also really important to get as much practice in as possible so that you develop your stamina and intuition. Best of luck!

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Jeffort
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Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: a testimony to the power of the good books (ps bibles)

Postby Jeffort » Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:49 pm

totaltest.milan wrote:The books are really good and are market leaders for the most part. One thing I never tire of telling my students as well as any potential students is that a big part of doing well on the test is the actual practice that you need to put in.

Specifically, you'd ideally need to do every single preptest out there under timed conditions.

The books will help by showing you the approach you need to take with each question but it's also really important to get as much practice in as possible so that you develop your stamina and intuition. Best of luck!


While I agree that spending time outside of class and/or prep book study time working LSAT problems is really important, I disagree with your statement in bold above.

You certainly do not need to do all, nearly all, or even half of the 67 available PrepTests timed to learn the test and hit maximum potential score on test day. Doing the churn and burn routine with tons of timed tests can actually be very counterproductive. Since it's a standardized 'pattern test', you can learn all the commonly repeated patterns, concepts, structures, relationships, etc. through slow motion study and dissection of say 10 to 20 tests (or even less, people got 170-180 scores in roughly the same proportions of test takers back in the early 90's when there were few full tests available to prep with).

The key is effective use of the materials. The important learning that helps improve performance comes from slow motion study and review of the tests and tested concepts/logic/etc.

Doing lots of full timed test practice is important, but not frequently (other than occasional ones to spot check improvement from study efforts) until typically several weeks before test day in order to build your stamina/endurance and to determine current weak areas to guide/fine tune further study. You don't learn much new blazing through tests timed other than getting a gauge of your current performance/ability level under test day conditions. The real magic happens during slow motion working and dissecting problems and being clear about the underlying logic behind each correct and incorrect answer choice, hence building pattern recognition of the repeatedly tested concepts and relationships.

Building understanding and accuracy builds the skills which in turn lead to speed.

totaltest.milan
Posts: 84
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:45 pm

Re: a testimony to the power of the good books (ps bibles)

Postby totaltest.milan » Mon Jul 11, 2011 9:53 pm

You're absolutely right Jeffort. It's after midnight here and I meant to write that you need to do every single LSAT question (and that's an exaggeration for effect, you don't need to do every single one - it depends on how well you're scoring, how much time you have, etc.). Doing every single LSAT preptest under timed conditions wouldn't be optimally effective. Your suggestion is spot on, learning the correct approaches to the different question types is best done with no time pressure and by doing the individual questions in isolation - slow motion study and review. I generally have my students (the ones who come to me with no previous experience and want a complete preparation) do that for roughly the first 20 to 30 tests (first individual question types, then individual sections) and then we work on confidence, endurance, and intuition by doing the last 20 to 30 tests at about a test a day for a month and a half before the test, with periodic review.




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