What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

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TIKITEMBO
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What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby TIKITEMBO » Sat Jul 09, 2011 9:55 am

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Last edited by TIKITEMBO on Sat Feb 18, 2012 12:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Ruxin1
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby Ruxin1 » Sat Jul 09, 2011 10:11 am

Don't draw them out in alphabetical order; go through the constraints and start with 2 variables and then add one that corresponds to one of the first variable. and so on. Will create less mess on your diagram.

HTH

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glucose101
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby glucose101 » Sat Jul 09, 2011 12:11 pm

Ya, for binary, just write them in on how they appear. Goes much quicker.

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Gizmo
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby Gizmo » Sat Jul 09, 2011 2:39 pm

Slots for everything.

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cmckid
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby cmckid » Sat Jul 09, 2011 6:16 pm

I just write a rule list and reference it? I just write it the same way I write the rule list on any question.

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TIKITEMBO
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby TIKITEMBO » Sat Jul 09, 2011 7:04 pm

Thanks for the help guys, but could you try to explain how it would visually look? I'm not sure what "writing them how they appear" and "slots" would be used with grouping games. I use that for linear games though.

I will have to start looking at how to draw the variables that are most related to each other closer together. It's something I thought might be useful both for neatness and speed...but I was being a bit lazy in trying to switch it up I guess.

I don't know if I could just write a list of the relationships. A visual really helps me.

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ms08g
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby ms08g » Mon Jul 11, 2011 12:01 pm

Read the first constraint and then plot it out on your In/Out diagram. Check it off. Find the next constraint relevant to what's already on your diagram and then throw it down on there. Keep going through each constraint in that manner until you have to go to a constraint that doesn't affect any of your variables, then repeat.

Problem for this method is closed games with subgroups. You probably still want to write down every variable by subgroup...so...
Image

FloridaCoastalorbust
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Re: What's your Grouping Game Set up Style?

Postby FloridaCoastalorbust » Mon Jul 11, 2011 12:18 pm

In/out are my faves and also fastest, although they take some getting used to in terms of discovering how many rules/implications you should right down. I think it is slightly different for everyone. I prefer to quickly right down all of the rules and contrapositives first (say maybe 30 secs) in two columns. I'll also create a third column that comprises longer chains. But I won't go much further and will keep the rest of the info in my head:

Rule...Contrapositive.....Inference(s)
A->B .....~B->~A
B->C..... ~C->~B ........ A->C

You'll notice that I didn't write the contrapositive of the inference. Writing contras for every inference usually takes too much time, and by the time you finish you are so lost in letters and arrows you have to start over. Keep in mind that inferences can contain over 4-5 characters at times, and it isn't always advisable to write it all out. Generally with in/out, the inferences are pretty easy to spot and sometimes don't require writing down. The nice thing is that once you pick up on contrapositives and inferences you can use them effortlessly to answer the questions.

For example, if a question were to ask what cannot be true if only D is selected, you can quickly prephrase the contrapositive of the above inference and think "A cannot be selected, B cannot be selected" because C can't be selected (and the contrapositive of the inference will tell you this rather quickly). In/out test your ability to read your own inferences. I think with practice, most people can finish in/outs under 4 mins




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