What type of tutor should I hire?

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IronSkadden
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Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 3:36 pm

What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby IronSkadden » Wed Jul 06, 2011 12:16 pm

Hi there,

I took the June LSAT and scored 167. While I'm happy I scored high enough to get T15 - T30, I want to go to a T10. I registered for the October test and am aiming for 173+ (my GPA is 3.58). I studied intensively for the June LSAT by myself, using the LGB, LRB, RCB, Kaplan Mastery, Superprep, and the 3 "10" books. I also took 17 timed, full length prep tests.

My June LSAT breakdown was:

LR1: -2
AR: -5
LR2: -3
RC: -5

My opinion is RC may be difficult to improve and, at -5 total, LR is about as good as it's going to get. So, I want to focus on games. There's no reason I shouldn't be able to go -0 on games.

I want to hire a tutor. What company should I use? I'm familiar with PowerScore's methods. But perhaps Powerscore has helped me as much as it can and I should try a different company's approach to games?

Thanks for your input...

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Blessedassurance
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby Blessedassurance » Wed Jul 06, 2011 12:19 pm

What game types give you the most problems? Which game types did you get wrong?

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IronSkadden
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby IronSkadden » Wed Jul 06, 2011 12:23 pm

I went -4 in the "balls" game at the end of the June section. It was a grouping/linear hybrid game...

My greatest weakness is a game with an unconventional setup (Dinos, most pattern games)...

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Blessedassurance
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby Blessedassurance » Wed Jul 06, 2011 12:38 pm

IronSkadden wrote:I went -4 in the "balls" game at the end of the June section. It was a grouping/linear hybrid game...

My greatest weakness is a game with an unconventional setup (Dinos, most pattern games)...


Was the balls attributable to time (I know it was the last game). I thought your problem might be related to binary grouping or sequencing etc for which I was going to suggest that it is best to supplement the LG Bible with Manhattan/Atlas since they have a generally more user-friendly diagramming method (for binary grouping and sequencing). Was the June test your first time? I think self-study might do the trick if you separate the game types and just drill them till thy kingdom come. If you must get a tutor, I would suggest an affordable private one, I doubt the general company classes would do you any good but I have no personal experience with tutors whatsoever. Reviewers say the companies tend to move at a slower pace commensurate with collective progress as opposed to focusing on private needs etc.

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david.patel
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby david.patel » Wed Jul 06, 2011 4:33 pm

I looked into this and I would suggest a highly recommended private tutor in your area because I think the major companies (PowerScore, Kaplan, Princeton, etc.) overcharge and sometimes try to teach you "canned" company methods.

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EarlCat
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby EarlCat » Wed Jul 06, 2011 5:31 pm

IronSkadden wrote:I'm familiar with PowerScore's methods. But perhaps Powerscore has helped me as much as it can and I should try a different company's approach to games?

I don't use the PS method myself, but there's nothing about it that would prevent you from getting 100% on the games section. Since you're already familiar with the method, I wouldn't switch. You're probably best off finding an experienced tutor who uses the PS method.

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loomstate
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby loomstate » Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:45 pm

Don't want to take away this thread from OP but I have an issue related that may help both of us.

I've got all games except undefined and moving - grouping down. I started diagraming these grouping games using logic chains (instead of double not arrows etc) but it doesn't seem to be working well for me. Should I try to go back and learn/use the Powerscore method? Is Manhatten/Atlas going to be the same logic chain method, or is it my best option? Cheers.

Audio Technica Guy
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Re: What type of tutor should I hire?

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Fri Jul 08, 2011 9:47 am

david.patel wrote:I looked into this and I would suggest a highly recommended private tutor in your area because I think the major companies (PowerScore, Kaplan, Princeton, etc.) overcharge and sometimes try to teach you "canned" company methods.


The problem with this is unless you live in NYC or LA there just isn't really an established market for private non-company affiliated tutors. I keep an eye on the market, and i live in an extremely large metro area of about 6 million people. There really aren't any private tutors with established reputations. I am absolutely sure that there are some good ones out there, but good luck trying to find one. The problem is that most of them tend to move on to law school before they've taught enough to be very good tutors. Those who stick with tutoring the LSAT enough to have experience tend to work for the major companies because it is a comparatively more stable pay check. I'd love to keep the extra $100 per hour that students pay TPR for my services, but without TPR's marketing, I'd probably never get the amount of work I do, most really great tutors find this to be the case as well. You just can't make any sort of living on tutoring by yourself and you won't become a great tutor doing it just on the side.

I've also had a lot of students who threw a lot of money at a private, non-company affiliated tutor and they always complain about lack of organization from the tutor. Some bad company affiliated tutors over rely on "canned methods" true, however, a lot, if not most non-affiliated tutors are just making stuff up as they go along, because they just don't have the R&D resources that a large company does. When TPR introduces a new method, it's put through months of intense evaluation by like 10-20 experienced LSAT teachers who made 180s. When local joe who made a 175 and is doing private tutoring on the side introduces a new method, it's usually because it worked for one student, one time. I also hear a lot of complaints about hidden costs with private tutorials. Because private tutors don't have licensing agreements, you're faced with 2 choices for your material, 1) illegally copying practice tests or 2) making the student buy all the prep materials. Most private tutors opt for 2, which can add a couple hundred bucks to your cost, and can just be difficult to search down every released LSAT, which you get access to with a company like TPR for no additional cost.

Finally, when you sign up for private tutoring with TPR, you get access to around 100 video lessons, you get access to every single released LSAT, you get access to explanations for every single released LSAT question, you get access to detailed breakdowns of your performance on every practice test you enter in to the computer. This allows you to turn a 24 hour tutorial program into something more like 300 hours or more of guided study, if you wish.

Anyway, not so much disagreeing with you as much as just providing the counterpoints.




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