Good approach?

JoeC12
Posts: 83
Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 11:06 pm

Good approach?

Postby JoeC12 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:33 pm

Took the June 2011 LSAT and scored 158, pretty much what I was PT'ing (high of 161). I took a Testmasters course and I do not believe I took full advantage of everything they offered due to a heavy course load (18 credits) and my participation in a Division 1 sport. I plan on taking the October LSAT and I was wondering if this is a good approach...

Buy the powerscore bibles, take two timed prep tests a week, and take one untimed prep test a week to focus on taking the questions slow. Today I bought the LSAC's 10 official prep tests (the ones dating from the early 90's). After that should I purchase the next 10 (early 2000's)? I know I am capable of 165 on the real thing. Is this a good approach? Any suggestions? I hear really good things about the bibles. Keep in mind that I have all of my testmasters books so I have access to a plethora of questions as well.

JoeC12
Posts: 83
Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 11:06 pm

Re: Good approach?

Postby JoeC12 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:55 pm

Anyone?

JoeC12
Posts: 83
Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 11:06 pm

Re: Good approach?

Postby JoeC12 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:14 pm

Can someone give me advice?

User avatar
Tiago Splitter
Posts: 15487
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 1:20 am

Re: Good approach?

Postby Tiago Splitter » Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:19 pm

The Testmasters books have every question out there, but make sure you still have access to the answers. My understanding is Testmasters will let you see the answers but won't provide any explanations online without paying several hundred dollars.

I'd focus on drilling question types and just doing indvidual games and RC sections early. Take it slow to make sure your accuracy is improving before taking a bunch of practice tests. Once you have finished the bibles move on to the more recent practice tests in the weeks leading up to the test.

User avatar
KevinP
Posts: 1324
Joined: Sat Sep 26, 2009 8:56 pm

Re: Good approach?

Postby KevinP » Thu Jun 30, 2011 5:27 am

JoeC12 wrote:Took the June 2011 LSAT and scored 158, pretty much what I was PT'ing (high of 161). I took a Testmasters course and I do not believe I took full advantage of everything they offered due to a heavy course load (18 credits) and my participation in a Division 1 sport. I plan on taking the October LSAT and I was wondering if this is a good approach...

Buy the powerscore bibles, take two timed prep tests a week, and take one untimed prep test a week to focus on taking the questions slow. Today I bought the LSAC's 10 official prep tests (the ones dating from the early 90's). After that should I purchase the next 10 (early 2000's)? I know I am capable of 165 on the real thing. Is this a good approach? Any suggestions? I hear really good things about the bibles. Keep in mind that I have all of my testmasters books so I have access to a plethora of questions as well.


I don't know enough about testmasters to comment on their material but I will make a few suggestions. I will say a bit of the study schedule depends largely on the individual but overall, I think the following method should be fine.

First, read Powescore for LG/LR. Make sure you read them slowly and re-read any parts which you are not 100% clear on. I'd also supplement them with Manhattan's stuff if you are having trouble but note they may have conflicting methods.

Second, you want to work on accuracy, meaning all of your initial questions should be untimed. Instead of focusing on preptests, focus on individual question types. E.g. do necessary assumption questions the entire day from LR and simple linear games from LG one day and sufficient assumption questions from LR and grouping games the next day from LG.

Third, after you have mastered all the question types, work on speed by taking the test untimed and see how long that takes you (at this stage you should be missing at most only a couple questions per section). From there, work on improving your time until you get it under 35 minutes (33 if you want a bit of a safety net on the real deal).

Finally, work on endurance by taking preptests with an added experimental 5th section.

In summary: Accuracy, speed, and then endurance.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], ebmus11, freekick and 10 guests