What do you do?

tmc07d
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Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 5:51 pm

What do you do?

Postby tmc07d » Thu Jun 02, 2011 12:54 am

In logical reasoning after you've read the stimulus/question and come to a situation that your torn between 2 or 3 contenders what do you do? Do you re-read the passage, maybe just the conclusion, or what? Thanks alot for any help you can give me.

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incompetentia
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Re: What do you do?

Postby incompetentia » Thu Jun 02, 2011 1:00 am

Plug-and-play trial-and-error usually gives me a pretty good read on which way the question should break.


If it doesn't, then I flip a coin and the proctor writes me up

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lakers3peat
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Re: What do you do?

Postby lakers3peat » Thu Jun 02, 2011 1:14 am

I try to focus on the conclusion again and see if I've missed anything, then I re-read the stimulus, then I reread the answer choices, then I realize I'm spending wayyyyyyyyyyy too much time on one particular question and I guess, usually incorrectly, to later realize that I spent 5 minutes on a question, got it wrong, and I ran out of time on the last 3 questions and all 3 of them were easy ones that I could have answered correctly if I didnt waste those 5 minutes earlier. in conclusion, FML! :)



You're probably best off circling and guessing. Statistically speaking, if you are running out of time at the end of sections, the probability of you getting an additional point is way higher if you can go from 20% guess --> 50% guess. do that 3 times instead of 3 20% guesses and you will be way better off.

SanDiegoJake
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Re: What do you do?

Postby SanDiegoJake » Thu Jun 02, 2011 2:36 pm

I've said it before, and I'll say it again. First, at this point, I'm not looking for a reason to select an answer, but rather looking for a specific reason to eliminate an answer.

The way I decide which to eliminate is based on examining the differences between or among the answer choices I have left, and then comparing those differences to the prompt itself.

I focus primarily on the strength of language (e.g. "all" vs "most") and the scope of the answer choice (e.g. "all people" or "just policemen").

Good luck!

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citykitty
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Re: What do you do?

Postby citykitty » Thu Jun 02, 2011 5:04 pm

If I'm really stuck, I start picking out all the teeny words that initially seem inconsequential, and usually that will knock out an answer choice. If I really can't decide, I pick an answer, circle the Q, and then go back to it at the end of the section. I almost always have 3-5 minutes to review the few Qs that gave me trouble.

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YaSvoboden
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Re: What do you do?

Postby YaSvoboden » Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:59 pm

SanDiegoJake wrote:I've said it before, and I'll say it again. First, at this point, I'm not looking for a reason to select an answer, but rather looking for a specific reason to eliminate an answer.

The way I decide which to eliminate is based on examining the differences between or among the answer choices I have left, and then comparing those differences to the prompt itself.

I focus primarily on the strength of language (e.g. "all" vs "most") and the scope of the answer choice (e.g. "all people" or "just policemen").

Good luck!


+1 Word strength is the first thing I go to and it works quite well. Then I expand looking for a little word that changes the meaning.

bp shinners
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Re: What do you do?

Postby bp shinners » Fri Jun 03, 2011 2:53 pm

YaSvoboden wrote:
SanDiegoJake wrote:I've said it before, and I'll say it again. First, at this point, I'm not looking for a reason to select an answer, but rather looking for a specific reason to eliminate an answer.

The way I decide which to eliminate is based on examining the differences between or among the answer choices I have left, and then comparing those differences to the prompt itself.

I focus primarily on the strength of language (e.g. "all" vs "most") and the scope of the answer choice (e.g. "all people" or "just policemen").

Good luck!


+1 Word strength is the first thing I go to and it works quite well. Then I expand looking for a little word that changes the meaning.


+2.

After strength, go to equivocation (people/policemen, revenue/profit, production costs/consumer price index). To do this, see if the words used in the answer choice are the same as that in the conclusion. Sometimes, they'll switch a word to one that means the same to most people, but in reality is a different concept.




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