trying to figure all this madness out

MoneyBags
Posts: 28
Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 2:39 pm

trying to figure all this madness out

Postby MoneyBags » Wed May 25, 2011 12:20 pm

A few questions
I am about to order some practice tests from LSAC. (is that the best place to order them from?)
Also, i have seen various individuals ask questions about different questions on the practices tests they have on the ones from LSAC, I know there is an answer key included, but do they explain why the various problems are wrong or right??

Finally, what is the earliest group of tests I should buy?
7, 9-16, 18?
19-28??
29-38??

I really appreciate any help you all could give.

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tmon
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Re: trying to figure all this madness out

Postby tmon » Wed May 25, 2011 12:27 pm

The LSAC purchased tests wont have any explanations, with the exception of the three Superprep tests. I would look at Cambridge LSAT or LSAT Blog's options, unless you don't want to print on your own. Both have some explanations as options to purchase as well.

The tests you should buy all depend on your study schedule. If you're studying for October, which I assume, you'll want at least the most recent 10 group that was published. More likely you might want the next 10. It will help if you sit down and put together a study plan/schedule so you know exactly where your tests are going to go. That way you know if you'll be short or are wasting money on too many tests.

MoneyBags
Posts: 28
Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 2:39 pm

Re: trying to figure all this madness out

Postby MoneyBags » Wed May 25, 2011 12:38 pm

tmon wrote:The LSAC purchased tests wont have any explanations, with the exception of the three Superprep tests. I would look at Cambridge LSAT or LSAT Blog's options, unless you don't want to print on your own. Both have some explanations as options to purchase as well.

The tests you should buy all depend on your study schedule. If you're studying for October, which I assume, you'll want at least the most recent 10 group that was published. More likely you might want the next 10. It will help if you sit down and put together a study plan/schedule so you know exactly where your tests are going to go. That way you know if you'll be short or are wasting money on too many tests.



Thank you for the response!
and Wow. that's lame on LSAC's part.

I went to Cambridge and LSAT Blog's website, and I think i'll probably just buy from Cambridge (didn't see any pretests for sell on LSAT Blog..maybe I missed them?)

Also, due to some issues at home, i think i'll be staying a fifth year, so I have until next year before I really need to take the lsat and i wanna make sure that i kill it. So with the copious amount of time, which Cambridge one should i look into getting? They have like...62..I heard that taking about 30-35 is around the magic number to acing the test. Buy test 30 and keep after it until i reach the end?

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tmon
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Re: trying to figure all this madness out

Postby tmon » Wed May 25, 2011 12:48 pm

Have you taken a cold diagnostic yet? It might help to know where you're starting at score-wise. It's not uncommon to be in the 140s/50s at all, but if you're much higher then your plan of action might be a bit different.

I would download the free test on the LSAC website and do that. If you have a lot you can improve on (and that's the case for the vast majority of people starting their prep) then you should get other materials before starting to take practice tests. The Powerscore bibles are a great resource, and there are other materials, like some recent Manhattan LSAT publications that are also useful. With that much time, you want to fully understand the logic and theory behind the questions before starting to burn through full tests.

Many posters caution against studying for a year. Personally, I took a course, didn't get what I wanted, took over a year off, and have been at it since February, and going through September. Long-term studying is possible, but you have to be very committed, motivated, and smart about your use of materials. Different kinds of studying work better for different people. Some do quite well just by taking a test and reviewing it, 50+ times. More people seem to go a different route and do some section-specific work coordinated with some of the books I mentioned. If you want a sample schedule take a look at the Pithypike thread at the top of this forum. That's a much shorter schedule, but might help you get the idea of what I'm talking about.

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LSAT Blog
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Re: trying to figure all this madness out

Postby LSAT Blog » Wed May 25, 2011 2:31 pm

MoneyBags wrote:(didn't see any pretests for sell on LSAT Blog..maybe I missed them?)


Sorry about that - tried to make the link to them on my site as prominent as possible without being intrusive. Here you go.

MoneyBags
Posts: 28
Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 2:39 pm

Re: trying to figure all this madness out

Postby MoneyBags » Wed May 25, 2011 3:59 pm

Hey Tmon! Thanks. I am gonna join a class in June and also will be sure to check out the Powerscore bibles.

Sorry about that - tried to make the link to them on my site as prominent as possible without being intrusive. Here you go.[/quote]


LSAT Blog thanks for the link!
I was wondering, is there anyway to get explanations for the other types of questions as well? ie RC, LG??
thanks

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mickeyD
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Re: trying to figure all this madness out

Postby mickeyD » Wed May 25, 2011 4:19 pm

People say different things, but IMO, if you have the time and money, buy as many PTs as you possibly can.

While recent tests are more valuable because the focus on various concepts and patterns of reasoning may have shifted over the years, earlier tests are still extremely valuable because when you first start, you won't even recognize the difference in tests. They're a great resource to start learning the logic of the LSAT, practice the strategies you learn from the Bibles, and see tons of questions in order to make mistakes over and over and learn from them and so you can start recognizing the tricks the LSAT uses. I personally think it's better to do most of your initial work using earlier tests so that way you don't start working with the recent material until you've already learned the skills you need.

The games sections from older tests are even more valuable. They are really fucking hard. But once you master them, you'll be ready for anything that the LSAT throws at you on test day. I have not had many moments in my prep more satisfying then nervously attempting to re-do a game from the LG Bible that took me 20 minutes in February, and acing it in 6 minutes with ease.




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