LR

tittsburghfeelers
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LR

Postby tittsburghfeelers » Sun Apr 10, 2011 4:02 pm

Is there much of a difference between the LR on earlier tests and the LR on later tests? I've read that the RC and LG has changed over time, but I haven't really read anything concerning the LR. I've only worked on later tests, as I'm waiting to do newer tests closer to October (when I'm planning on taking the LSAT) so I was just kind of curious.

Thanks.

cubswin
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Re: LR

Postby cubswin » Sun Apr 10, 2011 4:04 pm

Old tests contain questions that share a stimulus. New tests don't.

tittsburghfeelers
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Re: LR

Postby tittsburghfeelers » Sun Apr 10, 2011 4:09 pm

So there are no "double" questions?

PS: Cubs suck lol. But I would definitely recommend their rooftop seats. We paid only like $80 a ticket for a game last year for a rooftop seat and all you could eat/drink. They had so much food and so much beer it wasn't even right.

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gdane
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Re: LR

Postby gdane » Sun Apr 10, 2011 4:53 pm

In past tests you would see more weaken and assumption questions, whereas you now see more flaw in reasoning, role and inference questions.

Just practice them. Theyre not that bad. I personally think Flaw and Role questions are easier to pick up than assumption types.

Also, I havent seen a two part question in a very long time.

Good luck!

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Jeffort
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Re: LR

Postby Jeffort » Sun Apr 10, 2011 6:05 pm

tittsburghfeelers wrote:So there are no "double" questions?

PS: Cubs suck lol. But I would definitely recommend their rooftop seats. We paid only like $80 a ticket for a game last year for a rooftop seat and all you could eat/drink. They had so much food and so much beer it wasn't even right.


Nope, double questions with two questions based on the same stimulus stopped appearing on the LSAT at least 6+ years ago, maybe longer.

The main change in LR sections over time when comparing old tests to new ones is the distribution of question types that appear per test. For example, principle questions were uncommon in the '90s but are much more common on the current tests.

Assumption questions (both necessary assumption and sufficient assumption) have not gone down in frequency though, and flawed method of reasoning questions are common nowadays.

PS: That's a hell of a deal, $80 for all you can eat and drink including beer? Wow, I would have gotten my monies worth and then some.

bp shinners
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Re: LR

Postby bp shinners » Sun Apr 10, 2011 7:35 pm

We've also seen a shift away from hard Must Be True questions in favor of 'Soft' Must Be True questions.

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Easy-E
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Re: LR

Postby Easy-E » Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:06 pm

bp shinners wrote:We've also seen a shift away from hard Must Be True questions in favor of 'Soft' Must Be True questions.


What defines a "soft" Must Be True question?

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Jeffort
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Re: LR

Postby Jeffort » Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:16 pm

bp shinners wrote:We've also seen a shift away from hard Must Be True questions in favor of 'Soft' Must Be True questions.


Yeah, that trend is noticeable when you classify the question type by the stem and tabulate the frequency of appearance of each per test.

I think your post might confuse some people though since it is easy to interpret the phrase 'hard Must be True questions' as a description of the difficulty level of the question itself rather than as a classification of the question type. I understand the distinction you are making but most people reading this board may not since you are using BP taxonomy terminology.

tittsburghfeelers
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Re: LR

Postby tittsburghfeelers » Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:40 pm

^^^
I'm confused as to what he's talking about. What do you mean by "hard" and "soft"? I understand that you probably aren't referring to the difficulty of each problem, but rather a difference between the two?

cubswin
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Re: LR

Postby cubswin » Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:40 pm

tittsburghfeelers wrote:^^^
I'm confused as to what he's talking about. What do you mean by "hard" and "soft"? I understand that you probably aren't referring to the difficulty of each problem, but rather a difference between the two?


My guess is that a "hard" must be true question has an answer that absolutely must be true, e.g. you are told that X is better than Y at some point in the stimulus, and the correct answer is "Y is not the best." What I think he means by a "soft" must be true question is one where the answer almost certainly describes what happened in the stimulus, but where it is technically possible (though highly unlikely) that it isn't true. Questions like this frequently have stems that ask something like "Which of the following is most strongly supported by the passage?" rather than actually using the phrase "must be true."

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Easy-E
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Re: LR

Postby Easy-E » Mon Apr 11, 2011 9:04 am

cubswin wrote:
tittsburghfeelers wrote:^^^
I'm confused as to what he's talking about. What do you mean by "hard" and "soft"? I understand that you probably aren't referring to the difficulty of each problem, but rather a difference between the two?


My guess is that a "hard" must be true question has an answer that absolutely must be true, e.g. you are told that X is better than Y at some point in the stimulus, and the correct answer is "Y is not the best." What I think he means by a "soft" must be true question is one where the answer almost certainly describes what happened in the stimulus, but where it is technically possible (though highly unlikely) that it isn't true. Questions like this frequently have stems that ask something like "Which of the following is most strongly supported by the passage?" rather than actually using the phrase "must be true."



Thanks for clearing that up. Love the pilkers 'tar btw

tittsburghfeelers
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Re: LR

Postby tittsburghfeelers » Mon Apr 11, 2011 9:22 am

cubswin wrote:
tittsburghfeelers wrote:^^^
I'm confused as to what he's talking about. What do you mean by "hard" and "soft"? I understand that you probably aren't referring to the difficulty of each problem, but rather a difference between the two?


My guess is that a "hard" must be true question has an answer that absolutely must be true, e.g. you are told that X is better than Y at some point in the stimulus, and the correct answer is "Y is not the best." What I think he means by a "soft" must be true question is one where the answer almost certainly describes what happened in the stimulus, but where it is technically possible (though highly unlikely) that it isn't true. Questions like this frequently have stems that ask something like "Which of the following is most strongly supported by the passage?" rather than actually using the phrase "must be true."


Gotcha. I actually prefer the "most strongly supported questions" to the "must be true" questions.

bp shinners
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Re: LR

Postby bp shinners » Mon Apr 11, 2011 11:43 pm

That is exactly what I meant, cubs. Sorry for the confusion, everyone!

cubswin wrote:
tittsburghfeelers wrote:^^^
I'm confused as to what he's talking about. What do you mean by "hard" and "soft"? I understand that you probably aren't referring to the difficulty of each problem, but rather a difference between the two?


My guess is that a "hard" must be true question has an answer that absolutely must be true, e.g. you are told that X is better than Y at some point in the stimulus, and the correct answer is "Y is not the best." What I think he means by a "soft" must be true question is one where the answer almost certainly describes what happened in the stimulus, but where it is technically possible (though highly unlikely) that it isn't true. Questions like this frequently have stems that ask something like "Which of the following is most strongly supported by the passage?" rather than actually using the phrase "must be true."




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