October 1991 second reading comp passage #12

secretad
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October 1991 second reading comp passage #12

Postby secretad » Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:23 pm

Can somebody explain to me how the correct answer to number 12 is d?

I had it down to b and d and I chose b begrudgingly. I did not like how choice b used the term often. However, choice d uses the phrase popular culture that Stilgoe never used. The author of the passage used the phrase in line 41 in a manner that I am not certain of in it's intended meaning, such an an observation of what Stilgoe uncovered with all of the material, or rather if it is used as an insult towards Stilgoe.

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EarlCat
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Re: October 1991 second reading comp passage #12

Postby EarlCat » Thu Mar 31, 2011 1:39 am

secretad wrote:Can somebody explain to me how the correct answer to number 12 is d?

I had it down to b and d and I chose b begrudgingly. I did not like how choice b used the term often. However, choice d uses the phrase popular culture that Stilgoe never used. The author of the passage used the phrase in line 41 in a manner that I am not certain of in it's intended meaning, such an an observation of what Stilgoe uncovered with all of the material, or rather if it is used as an insult towards Stilgoe.


Regarding B, the problem is not so much the use of the term "often," but "anticipates." There was no discussion whatsoever of intellectual writing anticipating and later being embraced by popular culture. Quite the opposite. Steilger believed that popular culture after 1880 rejected the "romantic era distrust" of the railroads once espoused by intellectuals.

Moving on to D, Stilgoe cited a large volume of the work by "unknown illustrators, journalists, and novelists," which the author dismissed this as useless, except perhaps for showing that the works of popular culture expanded. In order for this sizable collection of works to demonstrate the expansion of works of popular culture, the collection works must itself have comprised works of popular culture. In short, works for unknown illustrators, etc. = works of popular culture.

Getting to whether D is a good answer, we're asked what Stilgoe would agree with. Now that we know that works of popular culture were cited by Stilgoe, the question becomes what he thought he was citing them for. The point the author is making clues us in. The topic sentence of the third paragraph criticizes Stilgoe's assertion that ambivalence toward the railroad disappeared after the 1880s. The next sentence says that Stilgoe presented these works "[i]n support of this thesis." What thesis? That ambivalence toward the railroad disappeared after the 1880s.

Thus, since Steigler himself used these works as support, he must have believed they were reliable indicators of what he was trying to demonstrate.

secretad
Posts: 209
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:26 pm

Re: October 1991 second reading comp passage #12

Postby secretad » Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:50 pm

EarlCat wrote:


Regarding B, the problem is not so much the use of the term "often," but "anticipates." There was no discussion whatsoever of intellectual writing anticipating and later being embraced by popular culture. Quite the opposite. Steilger believed that popular culture after 1880 rejected the "romantic era distrust" of the railroads once espoused by intellectuals.

Moving on to D, Stilgoe cited a large volume of the work by "unknown illustrators, journalists, and novelists," which the author dismissed this as useless, except perhaps for showing that the works of popular culture expanded. In order for this sizable collection of works to demonstrate the expansion of works of popular culture, the collection works must itself have comprised works of popular culture. In short, works for unknown illustrators, etc. = works of popular culture.

Getting to whether D is a good answer, we're asked what Stilgoe would agree with. Now that we know that works of popular culture were cited by Stilgoe, the question becomes what he thought he was citing them for. The point the author is making clues us in. The topic sentence of the third paragraph criticizes Stilgoe's assertion that ambivalence toward the railroad disappeared after the 1880s. The next sentence says that Stilgoe presented these works "[i]n support of this thesis." What thesis? That ambivalence toward the railroad disappeared after the 1880s.

Thus, since Steigler himself used these works as support, he must have believed they were reliable indicators of what he was trying to demonstrate.[/quote]

Thanks so much EarlCat. The fact that you did not have to help me, but did, says a lot about you as a person. Thanks for that.




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