Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

lsat_doobie
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Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby lsat_doobie » Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:03 pm

I'm considering applying to an mba program in addition to law schools. However, the program I'm applying to requests a GMAT score by January 31st, so if I were to apply I would have to write the GMAT during this month. I was wondering if anybody had any experience about the GMAT and its difficulty. Can someone learn this test and do well within a one month period? I haven't taken any math since high school, but I'm a strong writer and I've done reasonably well on the LSAT (165). Anyone have any advice on some affordable prep books I could quickly get through?

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2014
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby 2014 » Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:53 pm

There's a free prep test that you can download somewhere on the gmat page (MBA.com?). I would take it and see how you do and go from there.

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Shooter
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby Shooter » Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:57 pm

lsat_doobie wrote:I'm considering applying to an mba program in addition to law schools. However, the program I'm applying to requests a GMAT score by January 31st, so if I were to apply I would have to write the GMAT during this month. I was wondering if anybody had any experience about the GMAT and its difficulty. Can someone learn this test and do well within a one month period? I haven't taken any math since high school, but I'm a strong writer and I've done reasonably well on the LSAT (165). Anyone have any advice on some affordable prep books I could quickly get through?


I've prepped for both, and GMAT is definitely easier.

I know a person who took the LSAT and was denied admittance at UF Law. That same person nearly aced the GMAT (740) and now attends Wharton.

CanadianWolf
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby CanadianWolf » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:10 pm

Your friend could have applied to Northwestern's combined MBA/JD program which only requires a GMAT score & an application to the business school.

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glewz
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby glewz » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:12 pm

lsat_doobie wrote:I'm considering applying to an mba program in addition to law schools. However, the program I'm applying to requests a GMAT score by January 31st, so if I were to apply I would have to write the GMAT during this month. I was wondering if anybody had any experience about the GMAT and its difficulty. Can someone learn this test and do well within a one month period? I haven't taken any math since high school, but I'm a strong writer and I've done reasonably well on the LSAT (165). Anyone have any advice on some affordable prep books I could quickly get through?


Yes and Yes.

I studied for a bit over 2 weeks - 750, 6. Should have been higher, as my practice tests were 770, 780, but on the morning of the test (at around 2 am) I took my first full practice test. (my first time doing the writing sections in addition to the Verbal & Quant)

Soooo I overslept the Quant section by 7 mins.


Here's what u need to do:

1. take a diagnostic

2a. If you suck at the quant section, buy Manhattan GMAT's quant preparation books. Those books + the practice problems can be finished in a bit over a week if you're efficient. Make a study guide of equations to reference. This is what I did, and I improved dramatically...though I think I'm pretty strong analytically so it might take longer if this is your weak part.

2b. If you suck at verbal, use Manhattan GMAT's Sentence Correction book to improve your grammar, Powerscore's Critical Reasoning Bible to improve the CR, and do more LSAT reading comps to improve that section. I didn't buy the Powerscore CR Bible, but I'm sure it's the way to go.

3. If u paid the $300ish for the MGMAT full set of books and online access, then you get 6 practice tests. Do them periodically, but keep in mind that those tests are harder than the actual exam.

4. Assuming that you have a month to prep, take your first mba.com practice test in the Middle of your month and take the second one near the end of that month. The mba.com practice tests are Very accurate predictors of your actual score.


Practice Books in sum:

Quant & Sentence Correction: MGMAT Books + online access ($239 full package): http://www.manhattangmat.com/Store.cfm

Critical Reasoning: Powerscore CR Bible:
http://www.powerscore.com/gmat/content_index.cfm

Reading Comp: Just use LSAT passages

lsat_doobie
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby lsat_doobie » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:31 pm

glewz wrote:
lsat_doobie wrote:I'm considering applying to an mba program in addition to law schools. However, the program I'm applying to requests a GMAT score by January 31st, so if I were to apply I would have to write the GMAT during this month. I was wondering if anybody had any experience about the GMAT and its difficulty. Can someone learn this test and do well within a one month period? I haven't taken any math since high school, but I'm a strong writer and I've done reasonably well on the LSAT (165). Anyone have any advice on some affordable prep books I could quickly get through?


Yes and Yes.

I studied for a bit over 2 weeks - 750, 6. Should have been higher, as my practice tests were 770, 780, but on the morning of the test (at around 2 am) I took my first full practice test. (my first time doing the writing sections in addition to the Verbal & Quant)

Soooo I overslept the Quant section by 7 mins.


Here's what u need to do:

1. take a diagnostic

2a. If you suck at the quant section, buy Manhattan GMAT's quant preparation books. Those books + the practice problems can be finished in a bit over a week if you're efficient. Make a study guide of equations to reference. This is what I did, and I improved dramatically...though I think I'm pretty strong analytically so it might take longer if this is your weak part.

2b. If you suck at verbal, use Manhattan GMAT's Sentence Correction book to improve your grammar, Powerscore's Critical Reasoning Bible to improve the CR, and do more LSAT reading comps to improve that section. I didn't buy the Powerscore CR Bible, but I'm sure it's the way to go.

3. If u paid the $300ish for the MGMAT full set of books and online access, then you get 6 practice tests. Do them periodically, but keep in mind that those tests are harder than the actual exam.

4. Assuming that you have a month to prep, take your first mba.com practice test in the Middle of your month and take the second one near the end of that month. The mba.com practice tests are Very accurate predictors of your actual score.


Practice Books in sum:

Quant & Sentence Correction: MGMAT Books + online access ($239 full package): http://www.manhattangmat.com/Store.cfm

Critical Reasoning: Powerscore CR Bible:
http://www.powerscore.com/gmat/content_index.cfm

Reading Comp: Just use LSAT passages


Appreciate the advice. I was thinking of taking a PT a little later tonight just to see where I stand. Is this a good idea, considering I've never seen or done any GMAT questions? Should I go for it or not waste material? You said that a test registration allows you to download 6 PTs so I'm thinking it wouldn't be a huge waste.

tomwatts
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby tomwatts » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:34 pm

Get the Official Guide books from GMAC (like LSAC for the LSAT). These are your only sources of real practice questions other than the two tests you get with the free GMAT Prep software. There's The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 12th Edition (a big maroon book), The Official Guide for GMAT Quantitative Review, 2nd Edition (a thin green book), and The Official Guide for GMAT Verbal Review, 2nd Edition (formerly purple, now blue), all easily available from your typical booksellers (such as Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss? ... at&x=0&y=0 ).

You'll probably want a book of technique as well, of which there are plenty (Princeton Review and Kaplan publish some, of course, as well as Manhattan GMAT and probably several others). I don't think I've ever looked at any.

I scored a 770 on the GMAT with not very much study after learning the LSAT well enough to get a 176, so it's definitely doable.

Oh, and some test prep companies (we — Princeton Review — for sure, probably others as well) offer free practice tests on their websites. These aren't as accurate as straight-from-the-source GMATs, but they're pretty close. Would be worth doing one of these for an initial diagnostic.

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verklempt
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby verklempt » Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:18 pm

The GMAT definitely does not require the kind of study that the LSAT does. If you have a strong command of the language, you should not have problems with the verbal, but you do want to make sure your quant score is in the ballpark. So many students ace the quant section that if you score below a 46 or so, your chances dim a bit at the top schools.

Note also that MBA admissions typically is more focused on your essays and LOR than your scores and gpa. So if you can crack a 700, you are in contention anywhere, and obtaining a 770 won't necessarily give you a better chance if you don't show the soft skills. You will want a good reason for the MBA, not just "it will look good alongside my JD."

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glewz
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby glewz » Wed Jan 12, 2011 5:47 am

lsat_doobie wrote:Appreciate the advice. I was thinking of taking a PT a little later tonight just to see where I stand. Is this a good idea, considering I've never seen or done any GMAT questions? Should I go for it or not waste material? You said that a test registration allows you to download 6 PTs so I'm thinking it wouldn't be a huge waste.


you will have 6 PTs from Manhattan GMAT, and 2 PTs from mba.com

take 1 PT from MGMAT right off the bat so you can identify your weaknesses


And on another poster's comment - yes the Original Guides are essential, and you will have them if you buy the MGMAT box set $239

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TLSanders
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby TLSanders » Thu Jan 13, 2011 1:28 am

lsat_doobie wrote:I'm considering applying to an mba program in addition to law schools. However, the program I'm applying to requests a GMAT score by January 31st, so if I were to apply I would have to write the GMAT during this month. I was wondering if anybody had any experience about the GMAT and its difficulty. Can someone learn this test and do well within a one month period? I haven't taken any math since high school, but I'm a strong writer and I've done reasonably well on the LSAT (165). Anyone have any advice on some affordable prep books I could quickly get through?


In my experience (10+ years teaching, tutoring and creating curriculum for both LSAT and GMAT), the answer to this question depends almost entirely on your comfort level with math. The math on the GMAT is not particularly challenging--it's basically 9th/10th grade mathematics made more challenging (if you're scoring well) by requiring more analytical skills and management of a lot of information. If you're math-phobic or just don't remember the basics, that will require some time investment.

The other important difference is the nature of the computer adaptive test and the very different strategies that go along with it. The fact that you can't skip questions, the impact on your score of not finishing a section, the inability to mark up passages and the switch back and forth between written calculations and entry of answers on the computer all make more difference than you might imagine, so practicing in format and on the computer under timed conditions is very important.

GROUPEDbooks.com
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Re: Have any LSAT writers taken the GMAT as well?

Postby GROUPEDbooks.com » Fri Jan 14, 2011 2:45 pm

Don't forget a key difference between the LSAT and the GMAT--the availability of official practice questions. You have over 60 PrepTests to study with when preparing for the LSAT, but only 2 GMATPrep practice tests and the red, green, and blue Official Guide books when preparing for the GMAT. For the GMAT, you want to practice with "fake" questions first and save most of the official GMAT questions for the two weeks before your test.




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