Has anyone ever challenged a LSAT question?

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TLSanders
Posts: 163
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:24 am

Re: Has anyone ever challenged a LSAT question?

Postby TLSanders » Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:06 pm

LSpleaseee wrote:Do you all really think that everyone at LSAC is a lawyer?


Of course not. I'm a little worried about where you got that idea (and how it will impact your performance on formal logic questions in which faulty assumptions about universality are at issue).

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Pleasye
Posts: 7970
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 4:22 pm

Re: Has anyone ever challenged a LSAT question?

Postby Pleasye » Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:25 pm

TLSanders wrote:Of course not. I'm a little worried about where you got that idea (and how it will impact your performance on formal logic questions in which faulty assumptions about universality are at issue).

Lol, please stfu.

TLSanders wrote:Is it simply because they're lawyers?

Sandro
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Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 12:12 am

Re: Has anyone ever challenged a LSAT question?

Postby Sandro » Tue Jan 04, 2011 3:38 pm

I once challenged an LSAT question. It was question #1 of LR1 on Oct10. I got it wrong. And by challenged i meant i got it wrong.

tomwatts
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Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: Has anyone ever challenged a LSAT question?

Postby tomwatts » Wed Jan 05, 2011 3:42 pm

LSAC doesn't remove very many questions from scoring because they don't screw up very much. The SAT removes a lot more questions from scoring partly because there are more SAT questions per year (7 tests per year, 170 questions per test vs. 4 tests per year, 100 questions per test — though the SAT also repeats tests/questions much more often than the LSAT does) but also partly because the SAT-makers screw up a lot more than the LSAT-makers do.

It is extremely likely that every LSAT question that has ever been removed from scoring was challenged based on the memory of an individual test-taker. The test-taker gets really irritated about the question, spends 2-3 minutes on it, fumes about it during the break, fumes about it again after the test, and probably fumes about it during the other sections, too, which drags the test-taker's score down. Then he or she calls LSAC after the test and complains about question 5 in section 3, or whatever, and LSAC starts its investigation. Rarely does that investigation turn up that the question is flawed, but occasionally it will.

So there's nothing wrong with challenging a question, but only about a half-dozen LSAT questions have been removed from scoring in 20 years of LSAT, so your odds are not good — and it's possible that fuming about any individual question throughout the whole test is an unnecessary distraction anyway. Let someone else challenge the question; you've got a test to take.




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