LSAT Practice Tests

sfreuden
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Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 11:23 am

LSAT Practice Tests

Postby sfreuden » Sat Dec 11, 2010 11:38 pm

How accurate do you find LSAT practice test scores? Because I just took my first one, and I'm pretty pleased with the results - but the test is from 1993, so I am wondering if that is at all an accurate predictor of actual score.

Has anyone had large discrepancies between practice scores and actual scores? Are results mostly consistent?

Thanks.

poi
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Joined: Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:56 am

Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby poi » Sat Dec 11, 2010 11:43 pm

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Last edited by poi on Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

sfreuden
Posts: 84
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 11:23 am

Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby sfreuden » Sun Dec 12, 2010 5:45 pm

Thanks for responding. That's what I was worried about. I guess I should get some of the newer PTs as well.

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confusedlawyer
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Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby confusedlawyer » Sun Dec 12, 2010 5:48 pm

PT's in general aren't an accurate indication of what your real score will be. The testing day conditions are open to so many variables, sometimes it feels like a lottery rather than a standardized test.

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robotclubmember
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Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby robotclubmember » Sun Dec 12, 2010 6:25 pm

confusedlawyer wrote:PT's in general aren't an accurate indication of what your real score will be. The testing day conditions are open to so many variables, sometimes it feels like a lottery rather than a standardized test.


It depends on what kind of test taker you are I guess. I think the recent tests are a very strong predictor of actual performance and are the strongest tool to prep by. They are actual LSATs, after all. They are highly accurate. But the tests have trends by time period, so the further back you go, the less relevant those tests become.

The testing day conditions are open to variables. That's why you prepare for that too.

For example, I shit anywhere from 2 to 4 times before noon (assuming I'm up at the standard of 7:30). I eat 4000+ calories a day because I like to lift weights. I knew this would be a challenge for test day... if you get up to go to the bathroom, may as well just turn your test in and leave (unless you're just that good). So I scaled my sleep schedule back the week of the test to be up by 4:30, so I could have my very active digestive tract vacated by the time I was sitting down taking the test. I knew there would be distractions, so I prepped in coffee shops and libraries. I never took a prep test at home. We all know that this shit is timed. So I timed myself religiously and dropped the pencil as soon as the time expired. You do things to get ready to be able to handle test day variables within reason, and then when you take the PT's, they should yield a pretty accurate indication of your test day performance.

I'm not smart enough to do well on the LSAT without preparing for it as hardcore as possible. But even if you aren't hardcore hitting it every day, you do have to prep honestly, or else the PT's probably aren't very accurate.

172/173ish represents the 99th percentile of test takers. Now, this forum has a lot of elites, sure, but there is a limited number of people that test in that range ON TEST DAY. There are plenty of people who take practice tests and get in that range though. Only 3 out of 10000 people get a 180 on test day, but a lot more than that will hit it in their PTing. I did. But I took it under ideal circumstances too, with an iPod on, totally chilled out, in the middle of the afternoon. So does that really count? It counts for practice but no, not as an accurate indicator of likely test day performance. If you read the forums now you'll find these same people who consistently destroyed their PTs are all freaking out over Dec's test because it was harder than they expected. They are trying to convince themselves the test was harder. It wasn't. They probably just didn't prep honestly. I would get false hopes too if I took PT's in nothing but optimized circumstances. There are variables, like confusedlawyer said, but you can incorporate almost all of them into your study regimen, within reason.

sfreuden
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Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 11:23 am

Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby sfreuden » Mon Dec 13, 2010 2:13 am

Thanks again. I will keep that all in mind when working on future PTs.

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niederbomb
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Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby niederbomb » Mon Dec 13, 2010 4:32 am

robotclubmember wrote:
confusedlawyer wrote:PT's in general aren't an accurate indication of what your real score will be. The testing day conditions are open to so many variables, sometimes it feels like a lottery rather than a standardized test.


It depends on what kind of test taker you are I guess. I think the recent tests are a very strong predictor of actual performance and are the strongest tool to prep by. They are actual LSATs, after all. They are highly accurate. But the tests have trends by time period, so the further back you go, the less relevant those tests become.

The testing day conditions are open to variables. That's why you prepare for that too.

For example, I shit anywhere from 2 to 4 times before noon (assuming I'm up at the standard of 7:30). I eat 4000+ calories a day because I like to lift weights. I knew this would be a challenge for test day... if you get up to go to the bathroom, may as well just turn your test in and leave (unless you're just that good). So I scaled my sleep schedule back the week of the test to be up by 4:30, so I could have my very active digestive tract vacated by the time I was sitting down taking the test. I knew there would be distractions, so I prepped in coffee shops and libraries. I never took a prep test at home. We all know that this shit is timed. So I timed myself religiously and dropped the pencil as soon as the time expired. You do things to get ready to be able to handle test day variables within reason, and then when you take the PT's, they should yield a pretty accurate indication of your test day performance.

I'm not smart enough to do well on the LSAT without preparing for it as hardcore as possible. But even if you aren't hardcore hitting it every day, you do have to prep honestly, or else the PT's probably aren't very accurate.

172/173ish represents the 99th percentile of test takers. Now, this forum has a lot of elites, sure, but there is a limited number of people that test in that range ON TEST DAY. There are plenty of people who take practice tests and get in that range though. Only 3 out of 10000 people get a 180 on test day, but a lot more than that will hit it in their PTing. I did. But I took it under ideal circumstances too, with an iPod on, totally chilled out, in the middle of the afternoon. So does that really count? It counts for practice but no, not as an accurate indicator of likely test day performance. If you read the forums now you'll find these same people who consistently destroyed their PTs are all freaking out over Dec's test because it was harder than they expected. They are trying to convince themselves the test was harder. It wasn't. They probably just didn't prep honestly. I would get false hopes too if I took PT's in nothing but optimized circumstances. There are variables, like confusedlawyer said, but you can incorporate almost all of them into your study regimen, within reason.


I have found through experience that there are a lot of things that are difficult to incorporate into a study regimen.

For example, how am I to make myself as nervous in my PT's as I would be on test day? Maybe I could try doing them at the edge of a cliff with a strong wind blowing?

Also, when I took the LSAT, I could not sleep at all the night before in spite of swallowing almost an entire package of sleeping pills. To simulate those conditions, I would have to practice taking PT's on 0 sleep.

If I do have to retake yet again, I'm actually considering doing this once a week. I have a job, so it would have to be one of the weekend days.

Has anyone ever tried this?

bartleby
Posts: 1315
Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 3:23 am

Re: LSAT Practice Tests

Postby bartleby » Mon Dec 13, 2010 4:43 am

niederbomb wrote:
robotclubmember wrote:
confusedlawyer wrote:PT's in general aren't an accurate indication of what your real score will be. The testing day conditions are open to so many variables, sometimes it feels like a lottery rather than a standardized test.


It depends on what kind of test taker you are I guess. I think the recent tests are a very strong predictor of actual performance and are the strongest tool to prep by. They are actual LSATs, after all. They are highly accurate. But the tests have trends by time period, so the further back you go, the less relevant those tests become.

The testing day conditions are open to variables. That's why you prepare for that too.

For example, I shit anywhere from 2 to 4 times before noon (assuming I'm up at the standard of 7:30). I eat 4000+ calories a day because I like to lift weights. I knew this would be a challenge for test day... if you get up to go to the bathroom, may as well just turn your test in and leave (unless you're just that good). So I scaled my sleep schedule back the week of the test to be up by 4:30, so I could have my very active digestive tract vacated by the time I was sitting down taking the test. I knew there would be distractions, so I prepped in coffee shops and libraries. I never took a prep test at home. We all know that this shit is timed. So I timed myself religiously and dropped the pencil as soon as the time expired. You do things to get ready to be able to handle test day variables within reason, and then when you take the PT's, they should yield a pretty accurate indication of your test day performance.

I'm not smart enough to do well on the LSAT without preparing for it as hardcore as possible. But even if you aren't hardcore hitting it every day, you do have to prep honestly, or else the PT's probably aren't very accurate.

172/173ish represents the 99th percentile of test takers. Now, this forum has a lot of elites, sure, but there is a limited number of people that test in that range ON TEST DAY. There are plenty of people who take practice tests and get in that range though. Only 3 out of 10000 people get a 180 on test day, but a lot more than that will hit it in their PTing. I did. But I took it under ideal circumstances too, with an iPod on, totally chilled out, in the middle of the afternoon. So does that really count? It counts for practice but no, not as an accurate indicator of likely test day performance. If you read the forums now you'll find these same people who consistently destroyed their PTs are all freaking out over Dec's test because it was harder than they expected. They are trying to convince themselves the test was harder. It wasn't. They probably just didn't prep honestly. I would get false hopes too if I took PT's in nothing but optimized circumstances. There are variables, like confusedlawyer said, but you can incorporate almost all of them into your study regimen, within reason.


I have found through experience that there are a lot of things that are difficult to incorporate into a study regimen.

For example, how am I to make myself as nervous in my PT's as I would be on test day? Maybe I could try doing them at the edge of a cliff with a strong wind blowing?

Also, when I took the LSAT, I could not sleep at all the night before in spite of swallowing almost an entire package of sleeping pills. To simulate those conditions, I would have to practice taking PT's on 0 sleep.

If I do have to retake yet again, I'm actually considering doing this once a week. I have a job, so it would have to be one of the weekend days.

Has anyone ever tried this?


Don't try it. While your determination is admirable, that is a ridiculous strat. Try sleeping 12-13 hours every day the day before your exam. I'm not sure what a sleeping pill is for you but if you take a Xanax and don't pass out immediately, you might be a special case. I don't suggest using Xanax though because it is really addictive. Talk to a doctor.




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