PT 49 S1 Game 2

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niederbomb
Posts: 962
Joined: Sat Dec 12, 2009 12:07 pm

PT 49 S1 Game 2

Postby niederbomb » Sat Nov 20, 2010 2:37 pm

I really, really hate this game. The first time I took this PT, 1 month ago, I only got through 13 LG questions but got them all right. The second time yesterday 19, all correct. But this game still kills me.

The key deductions seem to be that among FLMPS, only J and R can go in L or M. Also, G is F +P/s or P/S. I drew like 5 templates for this game and then painstakingly compared them to the answer choices, then screwed one up, and had to start over. Any simple way to do this game?

Manhattan LSAT Noah
Posts: 746
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:43 am

Re: PT 49 S1 Game 2

Postby Manhattan LSAT Noah » Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:20 pm

I wrote up explanations for this - I'll pm you the link - but I didn't find any inference that really ripped this game open wide. It seemed to come down to deft management of the rules.

Maybe someone else figured out something ground-breaking...

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niederbomb
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Joined: Sat Dec 12, 2009 12:07 pm

Re: PT 49 S1 Game 2

Postby niederbomb » Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:50 pm

Thank you for the explanation:

One question, though: In a game that requires writing so many hypos, why do you use RGJ as the base, creating three stacks, instead of FLMPS? Is it always best to use the set with the fewest variables as the base, or just here?

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AverageTutoring
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Re: PT 49 S1 Game 2

Postby AverageTutoring » Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:06 pm

niederbomb wrote:Thank you for the explanation:

One question, though: In a game that requires writing so many hypos, why do you use RGJ as the base, creating three stacks, instead of FLMPS? Is it always best to use the set with the fewest variables as the base, or just here?


The answer is, it depends :P Typically the base is determined via spacing. For example, if the game gives you categories X, Y and Z and it says that each of X, Y and Z contain 2 elements, then those guys might serve as the best base. Or if it gives you blocks. For example, we have the same players X, Y and Z but are told that X and Y cannot go together, and that Z and X cannot go together. Because these kinds of rules are best displayed via blocks or not blocks, it might be best to have the other given elements to serve as the base.




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