ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

chiyeung
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ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby chiyeung » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:18 am

Can anyone think or create a 4 year study plan for the LSATS?
ridiculous I know. Lets say this is for a college freshman.

thegrayman
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby thegrayman » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:19 am

no

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4for44
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby 4for44 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:21 am

chiyeung wrote:Can anyone think or create a 4 year study plan for the LSATS?
ridiculous I know. Lets say this is for a college freshman.


Sure- Get a good GPA for 2 years by not prepping for LSAT, prep Junior year, Take June

JacobH
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby JacobH » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:23 am

One problem I could foresee with such a long study plan is that the LSAT could change a bit in those 4 years. So one thing you must do is update your PTs as you study.

Otherwise, just take one of the 3 month study plans on this site and spread it out over those 4 years, haha.

You could potentially master the LSAT by the time you take it if you're diligent with your studying, IF you're not already tired of the LSAT by then.

Aside from the LSAT, do yourself a favor and take easy classes in college, obtain and keep a 3.8+ GPA and get some work experience.

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casper13
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby casper13 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:23 am

4for44 wrote:
Sure- Get a good GPA for 2 years by not prepping for LSAT, prep Junior year, Take June



TCR

JurisDoctorate
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby JurisDoctorate » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:33 am

I could see someone reading the Economist, Scientific America and the WSJ as a hobby. I could also see taking Critical Thinking, Logic and just doing a minor in Philosophy. Maybe taking some basic Psychology courses so they'd learn causality and a basic understanding of studies.

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danidancer
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby danidancer » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:36 am

There is absolutely no reason whatsoever for anyone to spend more than 6 months (and even this is pushing it) studying for the LSAT. Go have fun and enjoy undergrad - come back spring semester Junior Year.

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king3780
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby king3780 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:37 am

JurisDoctorate wrote:I could see someone reading the Economist, Scientific America and the WSJ as a hobby. I could also see taking Critical Thinking, Logic and just doing a minor in Philosophy. Maybe taking some basic Psychology courses so they'd learn causality and a basic understanding of studies.

+1

chiyeung
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby chiyeung » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:37 am

Thanks All!

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beachbum
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby beachbum » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:48 am

You had me at ridiculous.

In all seriousness, though, you're only going to psych yourself out with four years of studying and anticipation. If you really want to get ahead, take some advanced logic and english courses. Buy a subscription to the Economist (or a similar publication). And come back during your junior year.

chiyeung
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby chiyeung » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:02 am

I was thinking for reading and reasoning etc. I would learn this from reading and analysis history along with reading my own history books.
I am taking psychology 101. I may consider a philosophy minor. but importantly consider how it will affect my gpa?
I am considering logic courses outside of college.

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CGI Fridays
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby CGI Fridays » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:03 am

king3780 wrote:
JurisDoctorate wrote:I could see someone reading the Economist, Scientific America and the WSJ as a hobby. I could also see taking Critical Thinking, Logic and just doing a minor in Philosophy. Maybe taking some basic Psychology courses so they'd learn causality and a basic understanding of studies.

+1

imbored25
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby imbored25 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:07 am

fr: party
so: party
jun 1st sem: party/study
jun 2nd sem: lsat
sen: party

JurisDoctorate
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby JurisDoctorate » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:12 am

chiyeung wrote:I was thinking for reading and reasoning etc. I would learn this from reading and analysis history along with reading my own history books.
I am taking psychology 101. I may consider a philosophy minor. but importantly consider how it will affect my gpa?
I am considering logic courses outside of college.


As for the reading, I would really encourage using journals like the ones that are commonly suggested; you really want to read things that are similar to passages that are presented on the LSAT. However, I do know a GRE tutor who trained by "overloading"; she read the most dense research articles she could so LSAT passages would feel like light reading.

Good call on Psych 101. With philosophy, I don't know who you are as a student but, I always found these to be the easiest classes. Not only will you read learn logic and analytical reasoning, the reading materials are all excellent practice. But, above all, it's philosophy! It's just plain fun and I think it is to most prospective attorneys.

As for logic courses outside of college, if your college has a logic class - I don't see a problem taking that.

r6_philly
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby r6_philly » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:12 am

I "prepped" for over a year, but only 5-10 minutes a day about 4 days a week. I was working, going to school full-time, and just had a baby, so 5-10 minutes at 3am was the only time I could afford. I only did a complete prep test 2-3 times before taking the real test, but I was very prepared. If you are interested in acing the test, a systematic plan for four years should ensure you a great score. I seriously think, 10-20 minutes a day for 4 years should net anyone a 175+. I wish I started earlier.

chiyeung
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby chiyeung » Fri Oct 29, 2010 1:31 am

JurisDoctorate wrote:
chiyeung wrote:I was thinking for reading and reasoning etc. I would learn this from reading and analysis history along with reading my own history books.
I am taking psychology 101. I may consider a philosophy minor. but importantly consider how it will affect my gpa?
I am considering logic courses outside of college.


As for the reading, I would really encourage using journals like the ones that are commonly suggested; you really want to read things that are similar to passages that are presented on the LSAT. However, I do know a GRE tutor who trained by "overloading"; she read the most dense research articles she could so LSAT passages would feel like light reading.

Good call on Psych 101. With philosophy, I don't know who you are as a student but, I always found these to be the easiest classes. Not only will you read learn logic and analytical reasoning, the reading materials are all excellent practice. But, above all, it's philosophy! It's just plain fun and I think it is to most prospective attorneys.

As for logic courses outside of college, if your college has a logic class - I don't see a problem taking that.


I do like philosophy, so perhaps next semester I will try to make a schedule like this:

1. intro to philosophy or intro to moral philosophy
2. history class for my major
3. history class for my major
4. perhaps a psych course or easy science course like geography of asia OR LIBRARY STUDIES
5. a college required gen ed
6. this is a extra class and may overload me: but possible easy class like library studies 103 :P

I guess i can spend 20 minutes a day just doing some LSAT questions i have from a prep book along with some logic/reasoning prep books
I can read articles online too :)

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JoeShmoe11
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby JoeShmoe11 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:06 am

If you are purely looking to get into law school do the following:
- Easy major and easy classes. Do well in all of them.
- Get any "hard" classes out of the way Freshman and Sophomore year and schedule Junior year to be a breeze.
- A year is a bit soon but studying 6 months beforehand isn't a bad idea. For the first 2 years save up money and try to get your hands on as many practice tests as possible and get the LG Bibles. Maybe use that time to experiment and see what method you prefer for each section.
- Get familiar with logic through courses or read a book. Use your knowledge, try to apply it to everyday arguments and try to use what you learn in a way that it starts to come natural so that on the test you aren't as pressed for time.
- Subscribe to and READ something dense - everyone seems to fancy The Economist. Read the articles, understand them, and try to make sure that you are reading in such a way as to answer typical LSAT questions about them.
- Start a few clubs, do something extravagant.
- Try to find a way to meet people with ins at your schools of choice (no, I'm not joking).
- Study hard for the LSATs.

Do all that and you will probably have no problem getting into Harvard and if you're the type of person who is asking for a four year study plan I have a feeling you have the ability to do all of this.

And most of all, good luck and always persevere. LSATs will get boring and tedious but you will get through them adn if you try hard enough you WILL succeed!

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longdaysjourney
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby longdaysjourney » Fri Oct 29, 2010 9:47 am

I love answering questions like this. Lots of people don't take them seriously, but I think that planning ahead is wise. Please don't listen to people who say, "Take easy classes so you can be sure to get good grades." This will not prepare you for the LSAT or Law School.

Here you go:

Make sure that you are going to get a "liberal arts" education, in the truest sense of the phrase. To understand what I'm talking about you should read two books:

(1) The Trivium
(2) The Western Canon by Harold Bloom

After reading these books you will know what I mean by a liberal arts education. After you have finished you need to assess whether or not you are receiving a liberal arts education. If you're not there are a few different paths that you can take to achieve that goal.

If you want to stay at your current school, you should declare a double major in the humanities and hard sciences, for instance: Double major in English Literature (writing concentration) and Biology. On top of this you should find out what it takes to graduate Phi Beta Kappa from your university and immediately start working toward your goal. Additionally, you will want to take a few classes in economics, political science, political philosophy, business writing, business, and logic. To fit all of this in to four years you will need to plan very carefully, probably letting an adviser know your goals and sit down and work out a four year plan. Your summers should be spent researching or interning in a legal capacity.

Another option for the liberal arts education is to attend, not a liberal arts college, but a liberal arts college with a "great books" program. I would highly recommend St. John's College in either Annapolis or Santa Fe (the Western Books program, not the Eastern Books). Additionally, Kenyon College has a similar program, but I'm not sure. Write Professor Timothy B. Shutt for more info about the Kenyon program if you are interested.

Whichever path you decide on be sure to graduate with nothing less that an A in any class, take the hardest courses that you can, enter every writing competition that you can, and don't take fluff classes. Additionally, make it a priority to read every issue of (1) The Atlantic and (2) The Economist cover to cover. Spend your summers and free time reading books from "How to Read and Why," "The Western Canon," "1001 Books to Read Before you Die." I would also read the complete works of Shakespeare, Goethe, and Plutarch. Also, listen to audio lectures from "The Portable Professor Series;" they are out of print but you can order them used online. Participate in the school's honors program and take as many extra classes, every semester, as you can handle; don't ever give yourself an easy semester. Your goal is not just to get a 4.0 GPA, but to learn to think in a clean, structured, and rational way.

Doing these things will put you miles ahead of your peers--do not show off, do not be a chronic hand-raiser, do not be a brown nose, and always make sure that you're the dumbest person in the room (...just think about what I mean by that).

Additionally, you need to cultivate relationships with two professors. One in each department (humanities and science). Pick ones that don't make you nervous, seem relaxed, are extremely intelligent, and are not "popular" with other students. You don't want these professors to be the ones that churn out 3 dozen letters of recommendation per semester. When I say you should get close to them, you really need to get close to them...take at least four classes from them, do an independence study with them, make them your faculty adviser, have them supervisor your senior research, go to the bar with them, etc.

In addition to the above, you should join four clubs or organizations, with the idea that you may drop out of one or two. However, make sure that you have participated in at least two of these clubs for no less than four years, you should have a leadership role with responsibility in at least one. Participate in an athletic club for 4 years to boost your chance of winning a Rhodes scholarship.

After college have the aim of getting a prestigious job (investment banking junior analyst, paralegal at a top-10 firm, etc.) with the aim of holding it for 1 year whilst you prepare for the LSAT. However, winning the Rhodes scholarship or participating in Teach for America are also great ways to spend that year.

I would recommend three months of intense self study followed by an expensive, comprehensive two-month class with a top company (I'd recommend Manhattan LSAT).

Do these things and you will have done all you can to ensure the very highest lsat score and a scholarship at a top 3 school.
Last edited by longdaysjourney on Fri Oct 29, 2010 9:52 am, edited 3 times in total.

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3|ink
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby 3|ink » Fri Oct 29, 2010 9:47 am

no way

chiyeung
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby chiyeung » Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:41 am

Thanks to all for the advice. After some studying and partying, i will pick up a issue of the economist and WSJ. I find the articles along very informative and good to read as well.

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longdaysjourney
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby longdaysjourney » Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:48 am

chiyeung wrote:After some studying and partying, i will pick up a issue of the economist and WSJ..

Yeah, I'm sure you'll do fine. :|

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dpase22
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby dpase22 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:05 pm

chiyeung wrote:Can anyone think or create a 4 year study plan for the LSATS?
ridiculous I know. Lets say this is for a college freshman.


---

I agree with many of the recommendations given by longdaysjourney. However, I would like to distill the principle behind his conclusions*, so that your actions can flow naturally from your mindset, rather than merely following a list.

Challenge yourself constantly in ways that sharpen your analytic capabilities and expand the speed and scope of your comprehension. Furthermore, do this in ways that translate into a strong written application.

---

However, one key recommendation is missing from the post given by longdaysjourney. This is a lesson that I learned from experience, and something that I deem the most important aspect of preparation for the LSAT particularly: Invest immediately in your mental logical apparatus. Are you familiar with the concept of time-value of money? The idea that the earlier you have this asset the richer the dividends over time? Apply this concept to your most valuable asset: your mind. Sharpen your analytic skills immediately, and they will continue to sharpen over your college career. When the LSAT comes around, expect to score in the 90th percentile on your first Practice Test. I am not exaggerating or trying to be funny.

I can think of no better way of doing this than the way that I did it: purchasing at least three textbooks on logic, and going through them yourself in your freshman year. This will be more effective than merely taking a university class on the subject, unless you have time for the equivalent of at least a full year of various logic classes. (I am referring both to formal and informal logic, both of which will be necessary for the LSAT).

The ones that I personally used were "A Concise Introduction to Logic", by Patrick J. Hurley for a good although incomplete introduction to both informal and formal logic. I then used "Logic: Techniques of Formal Reasoning", by Donald Kalish, Richard Montague, and Gary Mar to develop a strong understanding of formal logic. This second book goes far beyond what you will need on the LSAT, but by going on to more advanced material you will find that the simpler material has become extremely easy. I would then also go through a text on advanced informal logic, however I do not know which of these would be most appropriate for the LSAT.

(Note that the principles used in the vaunted Powerscore Bibles are merely condensed summaries of what you will learn in the logic texts, and a strong logic background will make going through the Bibles much more effective than they might otherwise be. The Bibles do still have some special tricks that you will not see any logic text, but you will be in a much stronger position to immediately see why they work if you have this logic background.)

My point is that the earlier you learn these lessons, the more valuable they will be to you. Since you already plan on taking the LSAT. I would highly recommend investing a good amount of time in this program. It worked for me.

Feel free to PM me.

---

*rather extreme and possibly sarcastic

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longdaysjourney
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby longdaysjourney » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:41 pm

dpase22 wrote:*rather extreme and possibly sarcastic


Extreme, yes. Sarcastic, no. I set that out as a platonic ideal of lsat readiness. Something that, if executed flawlessly, would likely make you a shoo-in at Yale.

dpase22 wrote:However, one key recommendation is missing from the post given by longdaysjourney. This is a lesson that I learned from experience, and something that I deem the most important aspect of preparation for the LSAT particularly: Invest immediately in your mental logical apparatus.
...
I can think of no better way of doing this than the way that I did it: purchasing at least three textbooks on logic, and going through them yourself in your freshman year. This will be more effective than merely taking a university class on the subject, unless you have time for the equivalent of at least a full year of various logic classes. (I am referring both to formal and informal logic, both of which will be necessary for the LSAT).


This is indeed excellent advice. However, there is a broader framework that,--being in place before the study of in/formal logic,--is ideal to have. You want to understand the big picture (the education of your mind) first. That is why I recommended this book first, which enumerates and expounds upon the interrelatedness and importance of a mastery of logic, grammar, and rhetoric: "The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric by Sister Miriam Joseph". It also serves as a primer to logic, grammar, and rhetoric. Once you know the goal, it will be easier to attain. That is why I would recommend studying "The Trivium" and "The Western Canon" (I especially recommend the first and last chapters entitled, respectively, "A preface and prelude" and "An elegy for the canon." This book will instruct you on how to avoid certain pitfalls in contemporary higher education) before studying logic textbooks (A great one, by the way, is Douglas Walton's "Informal Logic: A Pragmatic Approach," an update of his 1985 "Informal Logic: A Handbook for Critical Argumentation").

chiyeung
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby chiyeung » Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:01 pm

wow guys this is a lot to take in at once. I am at the moment, have 1 prep wook with 10 LSATs, 2 bibles for logic and reasoning.
but i think i will buy 2 of those logic books and work on them. I'm also planning to buy a copy of the journalist 1-2 a month, along with reading of journals online and my own history books. i can devote 4-5 hours a week each day along doing lsat questions and reading those logic books with my classes. I think i will be in good shape by the time i do need to take the lsats

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Patriot1208
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Re: ridiculous but can anyone think of a 4 year study plan?

Postby Patriot1208 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:08 pm

chiyeung wrote:wow guys this is a lot to take in at once. I am at the moment, have 1 prep wook with 10 LSATs, 2 bibles for logic and reasoning.
but i think i will buy 2 of those logic books and work on them. I'm also planning to buy a copy of the journalist 1-2 a month, along with reading of journals online and my own history books. i can devote 4-5 hours a week each day along doing lsat questions and reading those logic books with my classes. I think i will be in good shape by the time i do need to take the lsats


Listen, you don't need to do anything the above poster is saying. It's fantastically over zealous. Most people, even with great scores, spend 3-4 months of intense studying and spent the rest of their college careers doing well in school and having fun.




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