timing

timothyk
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:23 pm

timing

Postby timothyk » Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:38 pm

hello all,

first time poster looking to get some input from fellow tlsers who have had experience with adjusting pace on practice/actual lsats.

based on your past experience with prepping, how long did it take (generally speaking) to speed up without sacrificing accuracy on the test?
i can currently finish the analytical reasoning section with about 2 minutes or so to spare to look over any answers I was not sure about.

however, when it comes to the logical reasoning section, i find that within the allotted 35 minutes, i can comfortably reach question 20
at or about 95% accuracy, but when I try to speed up to finish the remaining 5 or so questions, i end up sacrificing my accuracy rate in the process.
moreover, i find that i usually can finish the entire section at or around 39 minutes.

mathematically, i tried to see what would be better for me in the long run: A) get to question 20 but aim for 100% so that I get a -5 on the section B) speed up and hope that minimal damage is done in the process (with 4 practice tests, i ended up getting give or take 7 wrong). and finally C) give myself the extra 4 minutes to finish everything without rushing (i ended up getting -1, -2, -2 respectively on PT 32,33,50).

i understand 4 extra minutes is a lot of time and that if the actual lsat was 40 minutes per section and not the 35 minutes per section that it is now,
many people would undoubtedly receive higher scores. i have heard people say that as you practice, your pace "gradually" picks up and you eventually
finish within the allotted time. but "gradually" is pretty vague and i was looking to get a more concrete idea on how people have approached such a
problem in their own studies.

thanks in advance!

User avatar
JoeShmoe11
Posts: 355
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 3:16 pm

Re: timing

Postby JoeShmoe11 » Thu Oct 28, 2010 3:40 pm

First make sure you can properly do those last 5 questions as they tend to be the most difficult. Then my suggestion is to PT, PT, PT, PT, PT until you hate to even think about the LSATs (not literally). Speed, for me at least, came with lots and lots of repetition. Accuracy is more about understanding the underlying concepts and becoming familiar with the question types. As you do more practice tests you will see that the answers to the first 10-15 questions pop right out based on the way the questions is phrased (LR only of course). Last 10 or so will probably always require at least a minimal amoutn of thinking.

In terms of amount of time, I'd say you'll potentially start seeing a difference as soon as 5 PTs. To be really familiar though I suggest at least 20 though if you want to help yourself as much as possible get your hands on all the PTs you can and take them. Save the most recent ones for closer to the exam itself. They are noticeably harder than the older ones.

play2win
Posts: 55
Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 6:27 pm

Re: timing

Postby play2win » Thu Oct 28, 2010 4:35 pm

Personally I would complete sections without a timer in the beginning. you can't expect to speed up until you are able to answer every question with reasonable belief that you are getting them correct. I literally permitted myself 45 minutes in the beginning on the RC (or as long as it took, usually a bit less), because I was absolutely awful. But once I realized that I was able to get ~25 correct in these 45 minutes, I focused on moving quicker while still getting approximately 25 correct.

PT's are surely the way to go. You'll just get used to seeing the same types of questions over and over again, which improves both score and time.

Good luck.

User avatar
masochist
Posts: 247
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 3:14 pm

Re: timing

Postby masochist » Thu Oct 28, 2010 5:03 pm

I was convinced I would never be able to finish a LG section in 35 minutes when I began to study. This still seemed to be true during week 4 of studying. All of the sudden during week 5 I could finish LG. The shift seemed to occur over the space of two days. Don't worry if the time pressure seems impossible when you start out. Improvement on the LSAT seems to be a discontinuous process with infrequent big jumps in scores.

Since you are already doing pretty well untimed, I'd suggest forcing yourself to try to finish within 35 minutes. This way you can better determine what is taking too long. Remember that the problem may be a result of taking too long with easy questions rather than taking too long with harder questions. You have about 80 seconds for each LR question, but most questions should take less than 60 seconds. This gives you enough time to devote 90 to 120 seconds to the really hard questions with long stimuli or a lot of diagraming.

Of course, I am busy freaking out about October scores and wondering if I f'ed up one entire LG game so what do I know :)

User avatar
typ3
Posts: 1362
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 12:04 am

Re: timing

Postby typ3 » Thu Oct 28, 2010 5:34 pm

timothyk wrote:hello all,

first time poster looking to get some input from fellow tlsers who have had experience with adjusting pace on practice/actual lsats.

based on your past experience with prepping, how long did it take (generally speaking) to speed up without sacrificing accuracy on the test?
i can currently finish the analytical reasoning section with about 2 minutes or so to spare to look over any answers I was not sure about.

however, when it comes to the logical reasoning section, i find that within the allotted 35 minutes, i can comfortably reach question 20
at or about 95% accuracy, but when I try to speed up to finish the remaining 5 or so questions, i end up sacrificing my accuracy rate in the process.
moreover, i find that i usually can finish the entire section at or around 39 minutes.

mathematically, i tried to see what would be better for me in the long run: A) get to question 20 but aim for 100% so that I get a -5 on the section B) speed up and hope that minimal damage is done in the process (with 4 practice tests, i ended up getting give or take 7 wrong). and finally C) give myself the extra 4 minutes to finish everything without rushing (i ended up getting -1, -2, -2 respectively on PT 32,33,50).

i understand 4 extra minutes is a lot of time and that if the actual lsat was 40 minutes per section and not the 35 minutes per section that it is now,
many people would undoubtedly receive higher scores. i have heard people say that as you practice, your pace "gradually" picks up and you eventually
finish within the allotted time. but "gradually" is pretty vague and i was looking to get a more concrete idea on how people have approached such a
problem in their own studies.

thanks in advance!



Work on getting the first 20 correct faster.

Someone else gave you incorrect information in this thread.

The last 5 are not the most difficult in the section.

The last 2 are generally easy/medium questions.

At question 16 there is an upward shift in difficulty until 22/23. If you have a Kaplan lesson book from their class then you will find the exact statistical numbers used to show this or buy LSAC's super prep and plot out the difficulty ratings for the 6 LR sections in the book (They conform to this same graph), but here is my rough hand of test difficulty on LR.

Image


If you reach problem 20 and you have only a couple minutes left, go directly to problems 24/25, they're on average must easier than problems 20-23.

Knowing this, you should try to do the first 7 problems very quickly (less than a minute each) ** Here is where you bank time for later questions**. You should slow down a little bit on problems 8-9-10 and problems 11,12,13,14 should be relatively easy. When you hit problem 15,16 slow down and look for trap answers and go back to thinking very conceptually about problems. (Use the skills you learn in the LRB or study aide of your choice). Problems 24 and 25 are basically free points for test takers who get to them.. this is one way LSAC weeds out different test scorers.

Getting to all 25 questions will separate you from a 150. Getting half of the problems between 16-23 will get you a 160 on average.
Acing the problems in this area will generally get you in the 170 range.




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