LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

motiontodismiss
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby motiontodismiss » Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:41 pm

The LSAT is starting to grow on me a little. It sucks when my raw score go down 10 points before it goes up 15 but at least overall, it's going up. If this trend continues, I want to see a downtrend on the last PrepTest before the real thing, because statistically speaking, if past performance is in any way correlated to future performance, I'll do better on the real thing. Like 174->169->175. Or something like that.

nStiver
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby nStiver » Thu Oct 21, 2010 11:26 pm

dhrizek wrote:
tomwatts wrote: if you're just filling out the rest of your schedule with classes you have to take in order to graduate, it's not at all surprising that you're feeling a little bit of a let down after the LSAT. Hopefully you'll like law school.


Yes, because if you hate having a schedule filled to the brim with classes you are forced to take, you will find that law school is a complete 360 degree transition.


Well, I assume most people who go to law school have an interest in learning about the law to begin with (at least I hope they do :shock: ). Sure, there are going to be some boring parts, but thats life. That is far different than my situation, as a history major who has taken 400+ level classes and is now taking survey of mathematics (where we literally count things) and spanish 101. Thats what I get for putting that shit off till the last minute.

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aevea
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby aevea » Fri Oct 22, 2010 1:14 am

JazzOne wrote:
tomwatts wrote:As soon as an LSAT argument begins, "There is relatively little room for growth in the overall carpet market," I'm hooked.

Every now and then my students talk about this, especially the repeat students (the ones who went up 10 points in the first go-round but are taking the test again because they wanted to go up 20 points, that sort of thing). There's a certain amount of instant gratification in studying for the LSAT. You work for 3 hours on a test, and then BAM, instantly you get a score that tells you how you did.

Then there are the jokes that LSAC inserts into some of the answer choices (the flaw in the argument is that it "appeals to the emotion of fear, which is often experienced by people faced with the prospect of losing their jobs to robots" or the [correct!] application of the principle is that the mother told her child that she loved both her children equally, even though it was NOT TRUE). You know that they think the LSAT is fun, too. Unless you have professors who are very dry and intense and then break the tension with totally unexpected levity randomly about once every half hour, you're not going to get the same sort of thing in class.

Plus, logic games are fun (once you get how to do them), and most people don't do anything like them in any class they ever take in undergrad.

So if you're just filling out the rest of your schedule with classes you have to take in order to graduate, it's not at all surprising that you're feeling a little bit of a let down after the LSAT. Hopefully you'll like law school.

I love the principle question where one of the answers states that the guy agreed to go on a canoe trip with his family, despite having severe heart problems, because he did not want to inconvenience his wife, who had made the plans far in advance. That one cracks me up every time.


Maybe this should be a separate thread, but I was going through the arguments from PT31 and several of them cracked me up.

A flaw question has an answer choice about physicists circumventing the laws of physics in everyday life and then a misinterpretation question asserts that prepositions should be eliminated from the English language.

LSAC certainly has a couple of writers with a sense of the absurd.

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cornell
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby cornell » Fri Oct 22, 2010 1:20 am

I also found the LSAT interesting especially some of the RC passages, but I definitely think my undergrad classes were way better. I mean you can't really compare a test with full academic courses, the test itself has no project, discussion, or any sort of interaction with people (except TLS of course). It's really just a test.

I miss my finance and economics classes.

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Blumpbeef
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby Blumpbeef » Fri Oct 22, 2010 3:46 am

cornell wrote:the test itself has no project, discussion, or any sort of interaction with people


*swoons*

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incompetentia
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby incompetentia » Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:49 am

What's people?

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Ragged
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Re: LSAT more interesting than undergrad work?

Postby Ragged » Sun Oct 24, 2010 12:07 pm

But what about the meaningful interactions with the clowns, the birdwatchers, the critics and the ecnomists? You befriend them to the point that you even start using friend nicknames like P and N and V to refer to them.




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