WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

youknowryan
Posts: 182
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 3:20 am

WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby youknowryan » Sun Oct 10, 2010 11:01 pm

This one threw me for a loop since it has three indicators in it.

It is clear that if Bob's dismissal was justified, then he was either incompetent or late.


Do I treat it like a standard "or" statement?

dismissal justified -> late or incompetent


Or do I treat it like an either/or statement?

not incompetent (dismissal not justified) -> late (dismissal justified)

not late (dismissal not justified) -> incompetent (dismissal justified)


I am leaning toward the second option. Thoughts?

User avatar
ziggie
Posts: 121
Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 11:29 pm

Re: WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby ziggie » Sun Oct 10, 2010 11:13 pm

dismissal justified -> late or incompetent

or you can also write it as

not late AND not incompetent -> dismissal NOT justified

youknowryan
Posts: 182
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 3:20 am

Re: WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby youknowryan » Sun Oct 10, 2010 11:32 pm

Any one able to confirm this? THe "either" part is what still has my attention.

kilgoretrout103
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 5:34 pm

Re: WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby kilgoretrout103 » Mon Oct 11, 2010 12:15 am

Ziggie is right.

Formal logic:

-J -> (I v L)

Contrapositive:

(-I & -L) -> J

J = Bob's dismissal was justified
I = incompetent
L = late

And "v" is a vel meaning "or."

EDIT: "Either" still means "one or the other, or both." Every "or" on the LSAT is inclusive, unless they explicitly say "This and that and not both."

youknowryan
Posts: 182
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 3:20 am

Re: WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby youknowryan » Mon Oct 11, 2010 1:35 am

kilgoretrout103 wrote:Ziggie is right.

Formal logic:

-J -> (I v L)

J = Bob's dismissal was justified
I = incompetent
L = late




-J = justified or NOT justified?

kilgoretrout103
Posts: 37
Joined: Sat Oct 09, 2010 5:34 pm

Re: WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby kilgoretrout103 » Mon Oct 11, 2010 6:59 pm

"-J" means "not justified."

cubswin
Posts: 618
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 4:40 pm

Re: WFT? One statement contains, "If, either, or" HELP!

Postby cubswin » Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 pm

youknowryan wrote:
kilgoretrout103 wrote:Ziggie is right.

Formal logic:

-J -> (I v L)

J = Bob's dismissal was justified
I = incompetent
L = late




-J = justified or NOT justified?


kilgoretrout103 wrote:"-J" means "not justified."


I assume Kilgore rushed through this, since he correctly said that Ziggie was right. But the statement was "If Bob's dismissal was justified, then he was either incompetent or late." This making his symbolization (starting with ~J) incorrect. It should be

J --> I v L




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CMac86 and 7 guests