Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

lebroniousjames
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Re: Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

Postby lebroniousjames » Sun Aug 01, 2010 7:13 am

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Last edited by lebroniousjames on Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

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bmercado
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Re: Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

Postby bmercado » Sun Aug 01, 2010 7:31 pm

Nightrunner wrote:
Nightrunner wrote:Motivation:

Your performance on this single exam is the difference between acceptance and rejection, the difference between scholarship and no scholarship, the difference between a career with a ceiling and a career without a ceiling.

You can choose to bust your ass - and eliminate as many mistakes, reduce as much uncertainty, as possible - and capitalize. Or, you can sit around on a message board asking for us to do your willpower for you, while your competition studies. Hard.

Your call.


I really like this. Not only does it worry you and scare the s*** out of you, but it motivates you to keep going at it hard. LOL... I feel like it brings out the true competitiveness in you.

nStiver
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Re: Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

Postby nStiver » Mon Aug 02, 2010 3:57 pm

Columbia Law wrote:Wow, what a bunch of socially awkward losers (except for the post before mine).


What a moron lol.

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balzern
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Re: Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

Postby balzern » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:03 pm

Theodore Roosevelt

"“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

This gives me chills everytime I read it ^

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Day2Daze
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Re: Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

Postby Day2Daze » Mon Aug 02, 2010 8:59 pm

balzern wrote:Theodore Roosevelt

"“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

This gives me chills everytime I read it ^


Thats brilliant! Ive never read that, but it feels like I definitely should have at some point. Thanks for this one!

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Precessional
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Re: Quotes that will Motivate/Inspire while studying

Postby Precessional » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:16 pm

balzern wrote:Theodore Roosevelt

"“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

This gives me chills everytime I read it ^

Ditto.


Also, by LjakW:
It is a rare time in your life that you have the capacity to control how the rest of it will turn out. To chart your own course. To make up for past mistakes. To overhaul everyone else’s perception of you.

That time is now! If you are applying to law school, you have already decided to make a change. And the first step in the application process is, in actuality, the most important part of law school and will have repercussions for the next ten years of your life, if not for the entirety of your career. It is hard to underestimate the importance of this factor in applying to law school: it can overcome a low GPA; it can erase the taint of your subpar undergraduate institution; it can help you beat PhDs and Rhodes scholars to get into the school of your dreams. I should hope that you know what I am referring to by now.

No matter what anyone else tells you, the LSAT is the ‘be all and the end all’ of law school admissions. If you want to go to Yale, Harvard, NYU, UVA, or any of the other top law schools, a high LSAT score is your ticket. Even if you have no desire to attend one of those schools, a high LSAT score can pay for your tuition elsewhere and even put money in your pocket in the form of a full scholarship and stipend. $150,000 is nothing to scoff at and a merit scholarship can be the easiest money you will ever earn.

Now it is true that some of the ability necessary to get a 180 is innate and that some will never be able to achieve that score (myself probably included). Nevertheless, don’t fret, as those who are motivated enough can certainly increase their own score by a fair degree through studying.
The key to a high LSAT score is, in my opinion, nothing more than focused hard work. When I first took a proctored diagnostic, I got a 152. Some months later, I took the LSAT and got a 172, going from the 52nd percentile to the 99th. During those months, I went from caring very little about the test and just dragging myself into an LSAT class twice a week to studying four hours a day, six days a week.

Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book entitled Outliers: The Story of Success. Without giving away too much, the ‘story of success’ is that hard work leads to success. Throughout the book, he argues that by spending 10,000 hours doing something, one can become truly great at it. I certainly think that 10,000 hours of LSAT studying is a tad too much, but if you are not getting the LSAT score that you want in diagnostics, chances are that you have been studying too little. I estimate that including the 80 hours of class time with Testmasters, I studied about 250 hours for the LSAT. Calculating that as working for a scholarship + stipend at Cardozo (which I was awarded), I would have earned about $600/hour. My scholarship from UVA would have given me a return of $360/hour. Watching DVDs of The Wire may have been more fun then, but it would have been much less profitable.

I am probably not the best person to tell you how to study for the LSAT, but I think I am qualified enough to tell you to go study more. Study as if your life depended on it; I guarantee you now that significant parts of your life will be affected by your score.

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