Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

KJL
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Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby KJL » Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:14 pm

I just recently stumbled across this website and I can't believe I didn't find it sooner! It's a goldmine! I've been thinking for quite sometime now about going to law school. I figured I could atleast study/take the lsat and go from there. I borrowed some used practice books from a friend who recently passed the bar exam and I intend to purchase the Powerscore books that I've been hearing so much about. However, I'm basically at square 1 and I have no clue on how to even begin this studying process. Should I just start reading through the books and working on problems without timing it? I have no clue where to even begin. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!

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Bildungsroman
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby Bildungsroman » Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:15 pm

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=41657 is a great study guide for the LSAT.

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Na_Swatch
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby Na_Swatch » Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:20 pm

Pithypike's is a little intense for someone just starting out...

I think a good starting out point is to take one full length practice test (Kaplan often administers free ones or you can do it yourself) to find your general strengths and weaknesses while familiarizing yourself with the test, then going to your local bookstore and examining some of the basic LSAT study books that can get you started.

At that point you can branch out into the more advance powerscore books and large packets of practice tests as you figure out which areas you really need to focus on.

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LSAT Blog
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby LSAT Blog » Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:34 pm

Be cautious about which basic LSAT study books you use in the bookstore.

Many of them contain non-LSAC-written LSAT questions that are unrealistic and/or contain flaws and typos.

It's incredibly frustrating for someone just starting out to get things wrong not only because they don't understand something but also because the questions themselves are flawed.

If you're going to use a basic LSAT study book, at least read Amazon reviews of it first. If the book is riddled with flaws/typos, the reviews will generally say so.

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Geat27
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby Geat27 » Sat Jul 03, 2010 1:23 am

I posted the following a few minutes ago to answer someone else's topic (they had more or less the same question you did). I think this is a good approach to the LSAT:

First, take a few practice tests (with a timer, in a quiet spot, like a library -- try to simulate the real conditions of test-taking). See if you can find the time to take three practice tests. Then, score the tests. See whether there is any area (Logic Games, Logical Reasoning, Reading Comprehension) in which you are particularly weak.

Make sure to spend the most time studying in the areas in which you are the weakest -- the biggest gains can probably be found there.

Study using the books you bought, and taking practice questions. I used a PowerScore book for logic games, and thought it was great.

Once you have studied the different question types and feel more comfortable with them, take a practice test -- under timed conditions. Make sure to record your score.

Keep studying and take occasional practice tests (under timed conditions), always recording your score.

The scores you get on the last couple practice tests you take before taking the actual LSAT will very probably be very close to your LSAT score.

The LSAT is a hard test, and the potential for improvement through studying and practice is enormous. The test is also given huge weight by law schools in the admissions process (it may be the predominant factor). It might not be unwise to spend 50 or 100 hours studying and taking practice tests.

And one more thing -- You might consider taking an LSAT course, but they are expensive. If you are disciplined about setting aside time to study, I think you can do without a course.

Audio Technica Guy
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Sat Jul 03, 2010 9:07 am

If you even remotely have the money, take a class.

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gdane
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby gdane » Sat Jul 03, 2010 12:23 pm

Geat27 wrote:I posted the following a few minutes ago to answer someone else's topic (they had more or less the same question you did). I think this is a good approach to the LSAT:

First, take a few practice tests (with a timer, in a quiet spot, like a library -- try to simulate the real conditions of test-taking). See if you can find the time to take three practice tests. Then, score the tests. See whether there is any area (Logic Games, Logical Reasoning, Reading Comprehension) in which you are particularly weak.

Make sure to spend the most time studying in the areas in which you are the weakest -- the biggest gains can probably be found there.

Study using the books you bought, and taking practice questions. I used a PowerScore book for logic games, and thought it was great.

Once you have studied the different question types and feel more comfortable with them, take a practice test -- under timed conditions. Make sure to record your score.

Keep studying and take occasional practice tests (under timed conditions), always recording your score.

The scores you get on the last couple practice tests you take before taking the actual LSAT will very probably be very close to your LSAT score.

The LSAT is a hard test, and the potential for improvement through studying and practice is enormous. The test is also given huge weight by law schools in the admissions process (it may be the predominant factor). It might not be unwise to spend 50 or 100 hours studying and taking practice tests.

And one more thing -- You might consider taking an LSAT course, but they are expensive. If you are disciplined about setting aside time to study, I think you can do without a course.


No! No! No! I have to disagree with you on this one. From experience and other anecdotal evidence Ive learned that simply taking PT after PT doesnt help and can actually be detrimental to your prep. Take just one and work on your weak sections from there. If youre weak with LG, use the LGB. If youre weak with LR, use the LRB, etc etc. Dont pick up a PT until youve addressed all the areas. I made the mistake of preparing by taking PT after PT after PT. I went over my mistakes and all that, but I kept making them on every test. I never focused on the fundamentals.

I liken LSAT prep to football. First learn the fundamentals like catching and route running, then put them together in practice and by game time you should be good. You dont go into practice without knowing how to catch the ball correctly. Likewise with the LSAT, you dont take practice tests until you know how to attack the questions correctly.

Good luck!

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northwood
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Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby northwood » Sun Jul 04, 2010 1:58 am

take a diagnostic prep test to determine your areas of stregnth and weakness. Break down what specific problems you get right and wrong. Read the LGB and LRB ( Logic Game Bible and Logical Reasoning Bible) from cover to cover and do all problems in the book. Make sure to do all logic games at least 2 or 3times. First focus on fundimentals, then work on speed. If you find yourself having difficulty focusing or understanding why you got something right or wrong, then a course would be a good idea to think about.

Once you have finished these parts, take another prep test. Again break down the answers you got right and wrong. Also note the time it took for each section. Go back and re visit the problems you got wrong.,

from about 5 weeks until the day of the test, take 2-4 prep tests a week to build up endurance and fine tune your pacing. The day before the test, relax.

Walk into the test, dominate it, then go home and celebrate! Then begin your application process to your schools - if you are planning on starting in next september

If you dont like the score, dont turn in the applications, and again itemize the test, recording what you got right and wrong. ALso, note external factors, and how they influenced your performance on teste day. Go back and either self study again, ( focusing primarily on the areas you got wrong) or sign up for a prep course ( cost around a grand). Repeat until you have taken the test 3 times, or are content with your score. Good luck

KJL
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Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:05 pm

Re: Don't know where to begin. Any advice?

Postby KJL » Tue Jul 06, 2010 1:59 pm

Thanks everyone for taking the time out to comment on my post! Appreciate it!




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