LR Preptest 9 Section 2 #25

gradea
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Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 3:15 pm

LR Preptest 9 Section 2 #25

Postby gradea » Sun Jun 20, 2010 9:29 pm

Can anyone explain why the answer choice is A? Thanks.

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furrywalls
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Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 8:16 pm

Re: LR Preptest 9 Section 2 #25

Postby furrywalls » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:59 pm

The correct answer will point to an assumption required by the argument.

Choice A: Per (3), prepublication peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and harmful information from reaching the public. However, the argument concludes that waiting until a medical journal has published the research findings that have passed peer review is necessary to protect the public from making decisions based on possibly substandard research. Thus, the argument assumes that peer review will only be brought to peer review by a medical journal. Otherwise, there would be other ways to protect the public from substandard information and, thus, waiting until a medical journal has published the research findings that have passed peer review would not be the price that must necessarily be paid. Choice A is correct.

Choice B: Per (3), prepublication peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching the public. Even if there are people who do not serve on medical review panels but do have the knowledge necessary to evaluate medical research findings, peer reviews would still, per (3), be required to prevent erroneous information for reaching the public and thus the conclusion about the need for peer reviews conducted by medical journals would still hold.

Choice C: Opposite. Per (1), the general public does not have access to the research findings prior to their publication in a medical journal. The argument suggests that the public does have access to these journals and their potentially harmful information in them once they are published.

Choice D: Per (1), it is customary for journals to subject research findings to a prepublication peer review and the prompt concludes that all medical research findings must be subject to a peer review to protect the public. However, the argument does not require that all medical research findings be in fact subject to such a review.

Choice E: Opposite. The conclusion is based on the claim in (3) that prepublication peer review is the only way to prevent erroneous and therefore potentially harmful information from reaching the public. If this peer review process were subject to pressures that made its judgments less than impartial, this would undermine the claim in (3) that the prepublication peer review actually prevent harmful information from reaching the public.




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