true?

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glucose101
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true?

Postby glucose101 » Tue Jun 15, 2010 5:19 am

I'm sure this's been answered a million times, but...

So I'm following Pithypike's method of printing 3 copies of each exam question for section-type. I'm planning on then taking practice exams in full. Naturally, I will have seen the questions at some point (in fact, three times).

True?

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dub
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Re: true?

Postby dub » Tue Jun 15, 2010 5:45 am

If you need help with this question, I suggest the Powerscore LR book.

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glucose101
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Re: true?

Postby glucose101 » Tue Jun 15, 2010 8:53 pm

dub wrote:If you need help with this question, I suggest the Powerscore LR book.


?

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theavrock
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Re: true?

Postby theavrock » Tue Jun 15, 2010 8:58 pm

Yes that is true. Make sure you keep some time in between them and should be good to go. The reason you do them three times is to just drill them into your head. When you do a million LG's they just start to click, including new ones.

It seems counterintuitive to do the games over that you have already done, but trust me it works.

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glucose101
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Re: true?

Postby glucose101 » Tue Jun 15, 2010 9:20 pm

I've just seen so many "don't use all your PTs" all over the place, so I didn't know if it was right to practice 3x+PTs.

Thanks!

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theavrock
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Re: true?

Postby theavrock » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:09 pm

thats right. You want to save the most recent ones for the last month as you build up stamina for the real thing through full length tests. for instance if you have PT's 20-59, make 3 copies of each game in 20-49 and do each 3x's.

This way you can more accurately gauge your performance on LG without games you have seen before under test like conditions.

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Anaconda
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Re: true?

Postby Anaconda » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:20 pm

I have pre-planned which PrepTests I'm taking (about 8 or so from tests 1-39 - all randomly chosen, and all of tests 40-60), so I'm using the LG practice problems from the 31 or so tests I will never take in full. I only made photocopies of my "free tests" that I don't intend to take. I also looked at the list of LG by game type and made sure I had enough of each for practice.

Also, even if you did a LG problem in the LGB in June, and saw it again in a Prep Test in August, it may not be recognizable, so it wouldn't necessarily be misleading to your score.

WestOfTheRest
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Re: true?

Postby WestOfTheRest » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:44 pm

Here's my advice, use this method for RC as well. Do the RC once during a timed test, then do it once either untimed or timed again. The reason you do this is because the second time you read through you are fairly confident with the passage, so you can focus on the intricacies that matter. Trust me, this is the best method for getting better at RC.

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Anaconda
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Re: true?

Postby Anaconda » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:46 pm

CastleRock wrote:Here's my advice, use this method for RC as well. Do the RC once during a timed test, then do it once either untimed or timed again. The reason you do this is because the second time you read through you are fairly confident with the passage, so you can focus on the intricacies that matter. Trust me, this is the best method for getting better at RC.


Out of curiosity, how does re-reading the passage help you out on the actual timed test (not being sarcastic, just wondering how it has helped you out)

WestOfTheRest
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Re: true?

Postby WestOfTheRest » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:54 pm

Anaconda wrote:
CastleRock wrote:Here's my advice, use this method for RC as well. Do the RC once during a timed test, then do it once either untimed or timed again. The reason you do this is because the second time you read through you are fairly confident with the passage, so you can focus on the intricacies that matter. Trust me, this is the best method for getting better at RC.


Out of curiosity, how does re-reading the passage help you out on the actual timed test (not being sarcastic, just wondering how it has helped you out)

I've actually improved quite a bit. I started out getting -7 to -10, I'm now down to -0 to -2. Here's my suggestions which I sent to a friend 2 years ago now.

Well, like you have assumed, I have and still do struggle with RC, however, I have improved substantially since when I first started. I don't have a cure all method for you, but I do have a few study techniques that I believe you could seriously benefit from. These are not so much tactics, aimed at improving your abilities by just employing them, but more tactics that will aid you, if you employ them for a while.

The first, and probably the most important tactice I have for you is rather simple, but don't let this fool you as it is incredibly powerful. So here it is:

1. After you have taken any RC section, what I would suggest you do is not look at the answers, and return to this section at a later time.

2. When you return to this section, you are going to redo the section for a second time, and you are going to do it under timed conditions. This seems contrary too the way most people attack reviewing a section, most will say you should go through it untimed, I disagree. The reasons I think you should go through it timed in your second attempt are simple, you are studying for a timed test, and time tends to be everyones problem when it comes to RC.

The reason that going through it a second time is so important is because the second time through you will be rehearsed in the content of the passage. So you ask, "Since I won't be rehearsed with the content in the real thing, how does this help in the real thing?". Well the answer to this is quite simple, LSAT RC sections are about form not content. If you read the passage for a second time you will be able to focus on the form of the passage over the content of the passage. As you do this for more RC passages, you will start to notice that you are consistently reading more for form and structure the first time through. You will be effectively teaching yourself to read the RC passages the way LSAC wants you to.

3. Answer all the questions, just like you would during a normal RC section

Now for most people, this study technique might take months to master, but since I know you comprehend what I mean with regards to form over content, I believe a week or two at the most of using this technique will be sufficient for you to gain great insight into the RC sections.

The next technique that I believe you could benefit from is tied to the first. You should mark up the passage so it represents a LR question. With conclusions and premises and all. When you come across lists of premises(ie. the reasons for this include... etc), number them so that you know that they are there, they will probably play a pivotal role in the questions. And throughout the passage, focus on identifying the conclusion, just like you would in a LR question. Finally, link anything together with an arrow that you may notice logically links together. This will help you make the logical connections during the questions.

I don't suggest you use all the marking techniques on the actual exam (with the exception of numbering premises), as they will cost you valuable time, however, if you employ them for a little while, your brain will start to subconconciously make the marks and connections.

mst
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Re: true?

Postby mst » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:54 pm

I hate to be Mr. Sourpuss here but PP's guide is not perfect for everyone. I for one would HATE to do a question I've seen before. When it happens I spend 30 seconds thinking if I've seen it before, wasting time. I get sidetracked. I already know the answers so I can't analyze what's going on.

If you're going to use PP's method, I suggest saving 15-20 tests for the last month (at least 10 that are VERY recent) that you have not seen before.

WestOfTheRest
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Re: true?

Postby WestOfTheRest » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:55 pm

mst wrote:I hate to be Mr. Sourpuss here but PP's guide is not perfect for everyone. I for one would HATE to do a question I've seen before. When it happens I spend 30 seconds thinking if I've seen it before, wasting time. I get sidetracked. I already know the answers so I can't analyze what's going on.

If you're going to use PP's method, I suggest saving 15-20 tests for the last month (at least 10 that are VERY recent) that you have not seen before.


Personally, I think you should do every test as a timed test. You can look at them again later, but it's timing and pressure that will get you in the end if you have already done over 20 tests.




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