Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

ltrutledge
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Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby ltrutledge » Wed May 26, 2010 8:14 pm

I've posted before about my score being stuck, but I'm sort of curious as to what you all think about the "late bloomer" concept. Power score keeps telling me not to worry that my score hasn't improved at all from my diagnostic after 2 months of studying and about 8 practice tests because I might be what they call a "late bloomer" who doesn't see a score increase until very late in the game. It's 2 weeks before the test and nothing yet... literally not even a point since I started the class. Do you guys think this really exists or do some people just never increase no matter how much study time they put in?

jjlaw
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby jjlaw » Wed May 26, 2010 8:22 pm

I don't know if it's so much how much *time* you put in, but *how* you have been studying. Have you been thoroughly reviewing your PTs? It's more important to study smart than to study for a long time.

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PLATONiC
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby PLATONiC » Wed May 26, 2010 8:32 pm

This question really gets me to reflect back at how my PT scores improved. I've never actually done this... so lemme think...

My diagnostic was 154, which isn't too good, but not necessarily all that bad either. My score dropped after I went through the Powerscore bibles. I pretty muched drilled a bunch of LGs (sometimes doing the same LG a total of FOUR times, not on the same day, though). I also drilled RC, and found it to be very helpful; I've done some RC passages more than three times, actually. My philosophy was to gain familiarity with the test BEFORE trying to figure out what I did wrong. Obviously, I'd still review my mistakes in a disciplined manner, but after seeing so many question stems and LR structures and RC passages/questions, you sort of see patterns; you sort of learn how to manipulate the stimulus when it comes the LR, and the left side of your brain pretty much goes on auto pilot when it comes to LG.

After doing about twenty PTs, I was only scoring in the high 150s and low 160s. But all of a sudden, and I serioulsy mean all of a sudden; it just clicked. For me, I went from high 150s (i.e. 157, 158, and just once 161), to mid to high 160s (164-168). This happened in like a week. Now I'm in the 168-171 range. In some sense, you might be able to see a slow progression in my scores, but there was definitely an out-of-nowhere breakthrough for me.

Hey-O
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby Hey-O » Wed May 26, 2010 8:36 pm

You are the one who can answer this question. Do you feel as if you are improving? Do you understand the test questions more thoroughly? Do you know what you need to work on? Is it timing? A particular section? A type of question?

I really struggled with LG and I just worked at it a lot and re-did every LG until I could do it under eight minutes with no mistakes. There were times when I thought I'd never get it, but eventually (and slowly) it started to click and now it is my best section.

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PLATONiC
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby PLATONiC » Wed May 26, 2010 8:37 pm

Hey-O wrote:You are the one who can answer this question. Do you feel as if you are improving? Do you understand the test questions more thoroughly? Do you know what you need to work on? Is it timing? A particular section? A type of question?

I really struggled with LG and I just worked at it a lot and re-did every LG until I could do it under eight minutes with no mistakes. There were times when I thought I'd never get it, but eventually (and slowly) it started to click and now it is my best section.


+1

LG is my best section, and now I see them as free points. -0 on testday for sure.

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BigA
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby BigA » Wed May 26, 2010 8:42 pm

PLATONiC wrote:This question really gets me to reflect back at how my PT scores improved. I've never actually done this... so lemme think...

My diagnostic was 154, which isn't too good, but not necessarily all that bad either. My score dropped after I went through the Powerscore bibles. I pretty muched drilled a bunch of LGs (sometimes doing the same LG a total of FOUR times, not on the same day, though). I also drilled RC, and found it to be very helpful; I've done some RC passages more than three times, actually. My philosophy was to gain familiarity with the test BEFORE trying to figure out what I did wrong. Obviously, I'd still review my mistakes in a disciplined manner, but after seeing so many question stems and LR structures and RC passages/questions, you sort of see patterns; you sort of learn how to manipulate the stimulus when it comes the LR, and the left side of your brain pretty much goes on auto pilot when it comes to LG.

After doing about twenty PTs, I was only scoring in the high 150s and low 160s. But all of a sudden, and I serioulsy mean all of a sudden; it just clicked. For me, I went from high 150s (i.e. 157, 158, and just once 161), to mid to high 160s (164-168). This happened in like a week. Now I'm in the 168-171 range. In some sense, you might be able to see a slow progression in my scores, but there was definitely an out-of-nowhere breakthrough for me.


That was a really helpful post Platonic. I'd like to know how you "drilled RC"?

And to the OP, you shouldn't take the June test if you're not happy with where your scores are now. I think it's unlikely you'll have an epiphany before then.
Do you guys think this really exists or do some people just never increase no matter how much study time they put in?
I'm kind of curious about that myself. I've never heard of anyone on these boards not being able to improve at all with work. Maybe an LSAT instructor could answer it. You just haven't done that many PTs. Let us know after you've done about 30 if there's still no improvement.

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mottainai
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby mottainai » Wed May 26, 2010 11:50 pm

I don't know if my case is considered a "late bloomer" case, but I did experience a sudden jump in PT scores after I took a week off from studying. My increase was similar to Platonic's. I had been scoring in the high 150s, took a week off, and started scoring in the mid 160s. I haven't scored under 160 since then.

It seems like it took awhile for the LR training to sink it. I had been missing 8-10 per LR section prior to my week hiatus, but after that I never missed more than 5 in a section.

Like I said, I don't know if this is considered "late bloomer," but it's one example of a somewhat significant jump in just a week. Hope this helps.

motiontodismiss
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby motiontodismiss » Thu May 27, 2010 12:02 am

God I hope not....

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suspicious android
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby suspicious android » Thu May 27, 2010 1:33 am

I'm an LSAT instructor and to me this sounds like something a company might say to keep students from being discouraged and quitting, which is surprisingly common (I'd say a good 30-50% of people drop out of courses). If you're not improving, there's something wrong. It's normal to hit a plateau, it's normal to be erratic, but if you really haven't improved at all there's something really wrong. I can't say what is wrong, whether it's you, your instructor or the class, but in two months you should be improving significantly on LR or LG. You really need to take a hard look at what's going on, why you're missing the questions you miss. No one gets better magically, your score improves because you understand things better, or you are able to do things faster. I don't really believe that people can't improve, I think everyone who can get through a four year college degree has the tools to get at least a 160, but that really might take months and months for some.

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goawaybee
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby goawaybee » Thu May 27, 2010 10:05 am

I would say that it is indeed possible to experience the jumps. I had taken my first PT stone cold some time in march. scored a 149 or 150. didn't touch anything for some time, tore through LG bible in a day then took a few PT's in april and early may. Still doing terrible in games. Started scoring 154 on most of the PT's. I had the bright idea of taking one on a friday night starting at like 9pm. Well that didn't pan out, scored a 147. Got me down to say the least. I took 9 days off b/c at that point I felt with lack of consistency I was not prepared. On the next PT which was may 11th I scored a 157. The very next day I took another one and scored a 154. The last 4 I have taken have all been 157/158.

Sometimes the burnout on top of some psychological block can lock you up. Due to only having 6 weeks of being able to study part time I am aiming for 160. If i had more time I would shoot for 165-168 but I don't feel I have the time to get my LG skills up to par without another 6-8 weeks.

I wouldn't call it a myth, sure it could be "a psychological tool" for some courses/tutors to keep you from losing motivation but if it works I don't think it matters. Peoples ability to cling to negativity and feeling they are bound to perform poorly is a very real thing. Confidence is an essential part of this test IMO.

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kittenmittons
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby kittenmittons » Thu May 27, 2010 10:06 am

Really thought/hoped this would be about boobs

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GeePee
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby GeePee » Thu May 27, 2010 10:13 am

Do you feel like you are grasping the concepts better now than you did when you started? If you do, you'll likely experience a jump sometime soon with more studying.

I remember when I was drilling LR hard (for me, this is the best way to go from 170 to 175 consistently). When I first started to break up every LR question into question type and analyze each individual answer choice, my LR score plummeted. The amount of analysis that I put into each question was too much to reliably process at first. However, as my understanding of the question types became natural, my LR scores were consistently -0 or -1, which was an incredible relief.

If you feel like your problem is that you're being a little overwhelmed by new concepts, just keep drilling. If not, then it's possible that you might be in a little bit of trouble and should probably take a couple of days rest even though the test is coming up quickly.

andreea7
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Re: Is the "late bloomer" concept a myth?

Postby andreea7 » Thu May 27, 2010 10:42 am

ltrutledge wrote:I've posted before about my score being stuck, but I'm sort of curious as to what you all think about the "late bloomer" concept. Power score keeps telling me not to worry that my score hasn't improved at all from my diagnostic after 2 months of studying and about 8 practice tests because I might be what they call a "late bloomer" who doesn't see a score increase until very late in the game. It's 2 weeks before the test and nothing yet... literally not even a point since I started the class. Do you guys think this really exists or do some people just never increase no matter how much study time they put in?


No, I don't think that exists -- what exists is gradual progress. Do not believe that some hidden power within you will take over and all of a suddent the mysteries of the LSAT will be illuminated. It will not help you to think that way because you will fail to see what you need to do. You still have two weeks. What are your weakest sections? Most people see most improvement on the logic games section -- I was one of them. How are you faring on that section? In two weeks you have time to figure out the logic games section.

If you are seeing no improvement it means you have not identified your weaknesses and did not work on them accordingly. Take a few hours to work on each section slowly. Where do you make mistakes? Reading comprehension? Given the score I would imagine you get some questions wrong in there. So why is that? Do you read too fast and fail to see an important point? do you not understand the question well? For example, I was sort of skipping the end of the paragraph -- a fault of mine in life, not listening to the end of a sentence and sort of assuming what it says. So I worked on paying more attention. You get my point. Do the sections slowly, look at answers and try to understand why you didn't get it. Don't see, as it is tempting sometimes, some sort of fault or insurmountable obstacle within the test itself, but focus on how you react to it. Not sure if this helps at all. At any rate, if you don't feel prepared, there is still time to take the LSAT in September ,right?

Good luck!




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