Page 1 of 1

LSAT "or" inclusive or exclusive?

Posted: Tue May 25, 2010 4:59 pm
by Roma
On the GMAT in stimuli using the word "or", "or" is always inclusive, not exclusive.
For example, Mark or Mary means both Mark and Mary, not one or the other.
Does the same apply for the LSAT?

Re: LSAT "or" inclusive or exclusive?

Posted: Tue May 25, 2010 5:27 pm
by Atlas LSAT Teacher
The LSAT will say if it's only one or the other: "Tom or Mary, but not both." Otherwise, assume both is an option.

Re: LSAT "or" inclusive or exclusive?

Posted: Tue May 25, 2010 5:28 pm
by quasi-stellar
Yes, I am pretty sure "or" can include both as well. How did you do on GMAT?

Re: LSAT "or" inclusive or exclusive?

Posted: Tue May 25, 2010 5:34 pm
by dakatz
"Or" on the LSAT allows for the possibility of both occurring. So when you see "A or B", assume this means A or B or both, unless specifically told otherwise.

Re: LSAT "or" inclusive or exclusive?

Posted: Tue May 25, 2010 8:58 pm
by LSAT Blog
I agree with all previous responses.

As a follow-up to those, here's a bonus response:

Sometimes, the LSAT will say, "one, the other, or both" - even when it's not necessary to say both.


For example, take the following rule from PT33 (Dec 2000), Game 2 (birds in the forest):

If J, M, or both are in the forest, then so are H.


It could have said the following, and the meaning would have been the same:

If J or M are in the forest, then so are H.


In other words, the "or both" in the original is redundant (unnecessary).

-Steve

Re: LSAT "or" inclusive or exclusive?

Posted: Wed May 26, 2010 9:48 am
by Roma
Thanks for all of your replies!
That answers my question.