PT 46 Sec 3 Q 12

Saltqjibo
Posts: 271
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:47 pm

PT 46 Sec 3 Q 12

Postby Saltqjibo » Mon May 17, 2010 12:49 pm

This question drove me crazy as it prevented me from getting my first 180 and I changed it from the correct choice to the wrong choice. I picked A over C.
My reasoning was that A was more analogous because it involves decisions that involve both personal preference and result in worse economic investments (i.e. less educated workers), while C states that the 'interests of the community are not served' - but that seems very different from the stimulus' "not the most profitable investment".

I suppose one could argue that less educated workers are not inherently less profitable investments, but given that personal preference is still taking precedent over more tangible measures of employee competency (I think we could reasonably expect more educated workers to be more qualified) I think that this answer still has some serious merit.

Purely on a gut level I went with C, but then after long consideration I switched to A

What do you guys think?

tomwatts
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: PT 46 Sec 3 Q 12

Postby tomwatts » Mon May 17, 2010 1:28 pm

Saltqjibo wrote:This question drove me crazy as it prevented me from getting my first 180 and I changed it from the correct choice to the wrong choice. I picked A over C.
My reasoning was that A was more analogous because it involves decisions that involve both personal preference and result in worse economic investments (i.e. less educated workers), while C states that the 'interests of the community are not served' - but that seems very different from the stimulus' "not the most profitable investment".

I suppose one could argue that less educated workers are not inherently less profitable investments, but given that personal preference is still taking precedent over more tangible measures of employee competency (I think we could reasonably expect more educated workers to be more qualified) I think that this answer still has some serious merit.

I don't think we could reasonably expect more educated workers to be more qualified. These are executives in businesses. Work experience/accomplishments/specific skills are also going to be relevant. But I don't think we even need to go that far.

The principle illustrated in the original argument (the "stimulus") was that people often do things that excite them personally but aren't actually the best decisions for the entities they represent/serve. Money is not the point; it's just the particular application of the principle here. In order for A to be the same, it would have to state specifically that these less-educated people lead to less profit (or otherwise harm the companies), as the original argument does. C specifically states the bad consequences, whereas in A you have to assume negative consequences. That's why C is better.

Sounds like you got suckered by topic-matching, which is usually a bad idea on Parallel or Parallel-Principle questions. The technique point here is that an answer with the same topic (business, profit) is at least as likely to be a trap as it is to be right. Logical structure is supposed to match, not topic.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: cianchetta0, jagerbom79 and 12 guests