writing in answers at the end of a section

jason8821
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writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby jason8821 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:09 am

This may seem like an insignificant question, but knowing that every question counts, I am curious as to how much time after the proctor says "stop/drop your pencil" do you have to bubble in questions, and if you leave a quick dash/scribble would the scantron pick it up. I usually get to all but at the most 3-4 questions, and I am wondering if you can just dash them in real quick, or if you would get in trouble for that as I often lose track of time when the last minute or so is rolling in.

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blurbz
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby blurbz » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:19 am

You have exactly no time after the proctor tells you to stop.

You would definitely get in trouble for trying to bubble anything in after time and you'd also get in trouble for bubbling in the wrong section during the test. This "trouble" can range from a written warning (reported to schools) to being dismissed from the test (clearly bad and, of course, reported to schools).

In short: Don't do this to yourself. Try to get a hang of the timing. If you find yourself in a situation where you haven't bubbled in answers, count them as wrong while you're practicing. In the actual test, leave them blank. Getting caught would simply not be worth it.

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KibblesAndVick
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby KibblesAndVick » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:23 am

This is entirely the wrong attitude. You need to prep with the mind set that you're going to kick ass and take names. Emergency planning and mitigation should be the least of your worries.

Having said that, you probably have roughly 3 seconds after time is called in which no one will question you. That should be enough to fill in a few empty blanks. However, if you're OCD enough to be thinking about this you should just buy a watch and start guessing when you have about 15 seconds left. This will ensure you can randomly bubble in whatever you didn't get to without being accused of cheating.

jason8821
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby jason8821 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:24 am

ok thanks for the answers! Do most people use a stop watch at the test?

jason8821
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby jason8821 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:26 am

KibblesAndVick wrote:This is entirely the wrong attitude. You need to prep with the mind set that you're going to kick ass and take names. Emergency planning and mitigation should be the least of your worries.

Having said that, you probably have roughly 3 seconds after time is called in which no one will question you. That should be enough to fill in a few empty blanks. However, if you're OCD enough to be thinking about this you should just buy a watch and start guessing when you have about 15 seconds left. This will ensure you can randomly bubble in whatever you didn't get to without being accused of cheating.


Also saw above that you scored a 179, so obviously you came in with an attitude that allowed you to prevail. Were you consistently scoring 178-180ish in practice, or did you have a great day?

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cardnal124
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby cardnal124 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:28 am

jason8821 wrote:ok thanks for the answers! Do most people use a stop watch at the test?


You cannot use a stop watch. It must be a non-digital watch with no timer or other functions. I set my watch to 11:25 at the beginning of each section so 12:00 even was stop time.

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GordonBombay
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby GordonBombay » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:32 am

Buy the simplest, most reliable analog watch that you can. I had an analog watch with an "optional digital" background my first LSAT. I realized this too late and left it in the car for fear of it going off unexpectedly (it had before).

I recommend this: http://astore.amazon.com/buy.timex.watc ... B0002LYEJK

unless you can find one of those old school analog stopwatches

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BigA
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby BigA » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:33 am

Do they give a time warning when there are only a few seconds left, or do they only tell you at 5 minutes? I usually have at least a couple per section that I don't get to. It would be nice to have a warning at like 30 seconds

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cardnal124
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby cardnal124 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:36 am

^ Only at 5 minutes. Which is why having a watch is important

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KibblesAndVick
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby KibblesAndVick » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:41 am

jason8821 wrote:
KibblesAndVick wrote:This is entirely the wrong attitude. You need to prep with the mind set that you're going to kick ass and take names. Emergency planning and mitigation should be the least of your worries.

Having said that, you probably have roughly 3 seconds after time is called in which no one will question you. That should be enough to fill in a few empty blanks. However, if you're OCD enough to be thinking about this you should just buy a watch and start guessing when you have about 15 seconds left. This will ensure you can randomly bubble in whatever you didn't get to without being accused of cheating.


Also saw above that you scored a 179, so obviously you came in with an attitude that allowed you to prevail. Were you consistently scoring 178-180ish in practice, or did you have a great day?


Once you can score above 175 the LSAT stops being about intelligence or skill and becomes about nerves and luck. I was scoring in the 175-180 range but I definitely had a great day.

My point is that you need to put a lot of time into this. Hours upon hours. If you're willing to do this you don't want to be perfecting your guessing strategy. You want to be perfecting your understanding of the material. In the 4th quarter of a football game would you want your star receiver to be thinking about the advantages of going for 2 after a touch down? Hell no. You want him to be burning the coverage and winning the game. When you walk into the testing center you don't want to be thinking "How can I mitigate the inevitable mistakes I will be making". You want to walk in and think "I'm the badest motha fucka that ever took this test. Stop delaying my greatness and pass it out already".

Put your time into the material. It will pay greater dividends. You can make up a sufficient guessing strategy the night before the test if need be. But, don't preoccupy yourself with it. Work on putting yourself in a position where you don't need to guess.

jason8821
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby jason8821 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:57 am

KibblesAndVick wrote:
jason8821 wrote:
KibblesAndVick wrote:This is entirely the wrong attitude. You need to prep with the mind set that you're going to kick ass and take names. Emergency planning and mitigation should be the least of your worries.

Having said that, you probably have roughly 3 seconds after time is called in which no one will question you. That should be enough to fill in a few empty blanks. However, if you're OCD enough to be thinking about this you should just buy a watch and start guessing when you have about 15 seconds left. This will ensure you can randomly bubble in whatever you didn't get to without being accused of cheating.


Also saw above that you scored a 179, so obviously you came in with an attitude that allowed you to prevail. Were you consistently scoring 178-180ish in practice, or did you have a great day?


Once you can score above 175 the LSAT stops being about intelligence or skill and becomes about nerves and luck. I was scoring in the 175-180 range but I definitely had a great day.

My point is that you need to put a lot of time into this. Hours upon hours. If you're willing to do this you don't want to be perfecting your guessing strategy. You want to be perfecting your understanding of the material. In the 4th quarter of a football game would you want your star receiver to be thinking about the advantages of going for 2 after a touch down? Hell no. You want him to be burning the coverage and winning the game. When you walk into the testing center you don't want to be thinking "How can I mitigate the inevitable mistakes I will be making". You want to walk in and think "I'm the badest motha fucka that ever took this test. Stop delaying my greatness and pass it out already".

Put your time into the material. It will pay greater dividends. You can make up a sufficient guessing strategy the night before the test if need be. But, don't preoccupy yourself with it. Work on putting yourself in a position where you don't need to guess.


I agree with the analogy. None the less, I have put in, by most peoples standards (even on this board) a considerable amount of time, and I know where my relative aptitude lies. I would like to think that I could finish all 22-28 questions accurately with 3 minutes to spare, but I need to come up with realistic, consistent strategy that both challenges my abilities, but still maximizes my score, and I wanted to implement this strategy on my practice tests so that it becomes second nature on the test.

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KibblesAndVick
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby KibblesAndVick » Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:06 am

jason8821 wrote:
KibblesAndVick wrote:
jason8821 wrote:
KibblesAndVick wrote:This is entirely the wrong attitude. You need to prep with the mind set that you're going to kick ass and take names. Emergency planning and mitigation should be the least of your worries.

Having said that, you probably have roughly 3 seconds after time is called in which no one will question you. That should be enough to fill in a few empty blanks. However, if you're OCD enough to be thinking about this you should just buy a watch and start guessing when you have about 15 seconds left. This will ensure you can randomly bubble in whatever you didn't get to without being accused of cheating.


Also saw above that you scored a 179, so obviously you came in with an attitude that allowed you to prevail. Were you consistently scoring 178-180ish in practice, or did you have a great day?


Once you can score above 175 the LSAT stops being about intelligence or skill and becomes about nerves and luck. I was scoring in the 175-180 range but I definitely had a great day.

My point is that you need to put a lot of time into this. Hours upon hours. If you're willing to do this you don't want to be perfecting your guessing strategy. You want to be perfecting your understanding of the material. In the 4th quarter of a football game would you want your star receiver to be thinking about the advantages of going for 2 after a touch down? Hell no. You want him to be burning the coverage and winning the game. When you walk into the testing center you don't want to be thinking "How can I mitigate the inevitable mistakes I will be making". You want to walk in and think "I'm the badest motha fucka that ever took this test. Stop delaying my greatness and pass it out already".

Put your time into the material. It will pay greater dividends. You can make up a sufficient guessing strategy the night before the test if need be. But, don't preoccupy yourself with it. Work on putting yourself in a position where you don't need to guess.


I agree with the analogy. None the less, I have put in, by most peoples standards (even on this board) a considerable amount of time, and I know where my relative aptitude lies. I would like to think that I could finish all 22-28 questions accurately with 3 minutes to spare, but I need to come up with realistic, consistent strategy that both challenges my abilities, but still maximizes my score, and I wanted to implement this strategy on my practice tests so that it becomes second nature on the test.


Haha I'm sorry if I'm a bit overbearing. I'm slightly drunk. Just buy an analog watch. On you're practice tests make sure you always have a sense of how much time you have left. When it gets down to about 20 seconds start guessing. If you already looked at a question pick one of the answers that seemed the best. If you haven't gotten to the question pick whatever.

IMHO the best strategy if you think you'll be short on time is to "rush" on some questions so you can at least read over every question on the test. Even with the hard questions if you read it once you can eliminate one or two "obviously wrong" answers very quickly. It's better to do this with all of the questions than to spend all of your time on one or two and having to randomly bubble what you didn't get to.

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phoenix323
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby phoenix323 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:16 am

jason8821 wrote:I agree with the analogy. None the less, I have put in, by most peoples standards (even on this board) a considerable amount of time, and I know where my relative aptitude lies. I would like to think that I could finish all 22-28 questions accurately with 3 minutes to spare, but I need to come up with realistic, consistent strategy that both challenges my abilities, but still maximizes my score, and I wanted to implement this strategy on my practice tests so that it becomes second nature on the test.


It seems like you are just trying to justify your plan to cheat on the LSAT which 1) In no way "challenges your abilities" and 2) could potentially land you in a world of trouble.

I (like others in the post) think there is an intelligent way to guess. Get a good watch and when you get down to 2 minute, bubble away; just DON'T do it after time is called. It really isn't worth the risk.

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Knock
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Re: writing in answers at the end of a section

Postby Knock » Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:21 am

KibblesAndVick wrote:
jason8821 wrote:
KibblesAndVick wrote:This is entirely the wrong attitude. You need to prep with the mind set that you're going to kick ass and take names. Emergency planning and mitigation should be the least of your worries.

Having said that, you probably have roughly 3 seconds after time is called in which no one will question you. That should be enough to fill in a few empty blanks. However, if you're OCD enough to be thinking about this you should just buy a watch and start guessing when you have about 15 seconds left. This will ensure you can randomly bubble in whatever you didn't get to without being accused of cheating.


Also saw above that you scored a 179, so obviously you came in with an attitude that allowed you to prevail. Were you consistently scoring 178-180ish in practice, or did you have a great day?


Once you can score above 175 the LSAT stops being about intelligence or skill and becomes about nerves and luck. I was scoring in the 175-180 range but I definitely had a great day.

My point is that you need to put a lot of time into this. Hours upon hours. If you're willing to do this you don't want to be perfecting your guessing strategy. You want to be perfecting your understanding of the material. In the 4th quarter of a football game would you want your star receiver to be thinking about the advantages of going for 2 after a touch down? Hell no. You want him to be burning the coverage and winning the game. When you walk into the testing center you don't want to be thinking "How can I mitigate the inevitable mistakes I will be making". You want to walk in and think "I'm the badest motha fucka that ever took this test. Stop delaying my greatness and pass it out already".

Put your time into the material. It will pay greater dividends. You can make up a sufficient guessing strategy the night before the test if need be. But, don't preoccupy yourself with it. Work on putting yourself in a position where you don't need to guess.


Great post, this is very helpful.

How would they ever know if you bubbled for one of the other sections on your answer sheet? I'm not saying flipping back in your test booklet, that would be much more dangerous and noticeable, but if you're going to put down a complete guess and not leave any blank, why not just bubble a blank question from section 1 when your on section 2. I've never taken the LSAT, but I have a hard time envisioning anyone seeing you.




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