Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

honestabe84
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Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby honestabe84 » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:20 pm

Am I crazy to consider quitting smoking two months before the LSAT? I've been sick, so I haven't smoked in two days, and I figured that this is the best time as any to quit.

I really want to quit, but I heard many people have a hard time when they quit. I certainly don't want to be going through mood swings and have tremendous stress when I'm about to take such an important test. So I guess I'm wondering if I should hold off until after the test or if it really doesn't matter that much. Any advice (especially from former smokers) would be appreciated?

FYI: This is the last time I can take the LSAT.

OmbreGracieuse
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby OmbreGracieuse » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:28 pm

I think it all depends on where you think your mental and physical barriers are. If you can quit now and not impact your LSAT score, go for it! :)

I also think your posting the question rather than just dismissing the idea suggests you think you are capable of doing it and being ok.

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quasi-stellar
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby quasi-stellar » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:43 pm

I was wondering about this also.
Actually, I quit smoking for about 6 months not too long ago, but this addiction came back when I relaxed myself. So now I'm thinking about trying one more time, and even though I know can, Im not sure if I'll be able to set my mind on quitting.

I sometime wonder what would be the proprtion of 170+ test takers who are heavy smokers like myself ( I put out a pack a day easily).

honestabe84
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby honestabe84 » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:46 pm

quasi-stellar wrote:I was wondering about this also.
Actually, I quit smoking for about 6 months not too long ago, but this addiction came back when I relaxed myself. So now I'm thinking about trying one more time, and even though I know can, Im not sure if I'll be able to set my mind on quitting.

I sometime wonder what would be the proprtion of 170+ test takers who are heavy smokers like myself ( I put out a pack a day easily).


Same.

Right now I feel really motivated for some reason to quit, but I really don't want it to end up costing me even a SINGLE point on the LSAT.

Maybe I'm motivated because I'm sick and the last thing I want is a cigarette.

Shrimps
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Shrimps » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:48 pm

For how long have you smoked?

The thing is, nicotine is a "study drug", not dissimilar from amphetamine (though weaker).

"At low doses, nicotine potently enhances the actions of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain, causing a drug effect typical of those of psychostimulants. At higher doses, nicotine enhances the effect of serotonin and opiate activity, producing a calming, pain-killing effect. Nicotine is unique in comparison to most drugs, as its profile changes from stimulant to sedative/pain killer in increasing dosages and use. (Another drug that behaves similarly is ethanol.)... When a cigarette is smoked, nicotine-rich blood passes from the lungs to the brain within seven seconds and immediately stimulates the release of many chemical messengers including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin, arginine, dopamine, autocrine agents, and beta-endorphin.[30] This release of neurotransmitters and hormones is responsible for most of nicotine's effects. Nicotine appears to enhance concentration[31] and memory due to the increase of acetylcholine. It also appears to enhance alertness due to the increases of acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Arousal is increased by the increase of norepinephrine. Pain is reduced by the increases of acetylcholine and beta-endorphin. Anxiety is reduced by the increase of beta-endorphin. Nicotine also extends the duration of positive effects of dopamine[32] and increases sensitivity in brain reward systems." (wikipedia)

Further, recent research has found the NiQuitin/Nicabate 4mg lozenge has been clinically proven to help reverse nicotine withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking including the following: difficulty concentrating, attention deficit, short-term memory deficit and selective attention deficit(2) -- some of the issues at the core of yesterday's report.

Z3RO
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Z3RO » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:52 pm

I was a pack-a-day smoker myself when I started studying for the LSAT. About 2 months before the test, my girlfriend implored me to quit, saying she was scared that I was going to die early (I was a smoker for 5 years by then). I quit right then and haven't smoked since. I crushed the LSAT.

It's rough for a week, then it gets easier. If you really want to quit, you can do it. It will have no negative effect on your memory or ability to think clearly 2 months out. In fact, I was glad that i wasn't jonesing for a cig during the break in the test.

honestabe84
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby honestabe84 » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:53 pm

Shrimps wrote:For how long have you smoked?

The thing is, nicotine is a "study drug", not dissimilar from amphetamine (though weaker).

"At low doses, nicotine potently enhances the actions of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain, causing a drug effect typical of those of psychostimulants. At higher doses, nicotine enhances the effect of serotonin and opiate activity, producing a calming, pain-killing effect. Nicotine is unique in comparison to most drugs, as its profile changes from stimulant to sedative/pain killer in increasing dosages and use. (Another drug that behaves similarly is ethanol.)... When a cigarette is smoked, nicotine-rich blood passes from the lungs to the brain within seven seconds and immediately stimulates the release of many chemical messengers including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin, arginine, dopamine, autocrine agents, and beta-endorphin.[30] This release of neurotransmitters and hormones is responsible for most of nicotine's effects. Nicotine appears to enhance concentration[31] and memory due to the increase of acetylcholine. It also appears to enhance alertness due to the increases of acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Arousal is increased by the increase of norepinephrine. Pain is reduced by the increases of acetylcholine and beta-endorphin. Anxiety is reduced by the increase of beta-endorphin. Nicotine also extends the duration of positive effects of dopamine[32] and increases sensitivity in brain reward systems." (wikipedia)

Further, recent research has found the NiQuitin/Nicabate 4mg lozenge has been clinically proven to help reverse nicotine withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking including the following: difficulty concentrating, attention deficit, short-term memory deficit and selective attention deficit(2) -- some of the issues at the core of yesterday's report.


Well, you may have just convinced me to hold off on quitting until after the LSAT. I definitely don't want to risk my memory, attention span, or concentration.

honestabe84
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby honestabe84 » Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:56 pm

Z3RO wrote:I was a pack-a-day smoker myself when I started studying for the LSAT. About 2 months before the test, my girlfriend implored me to quit, saying she was scared that I was going to die early (I was a smoker for 5 years by then). I quit right then and haven't smoked since. I crushed the LSAT.

It's rough for a week, then it gets easier. If you really want to quit, you can do it. It will have no negative effect on your memory or ability to think clearly 2 months out. In fact, I was glad that i wasn't jonesing for a cig during the break in the test.


Ok. You are exactly like me. I've been smoking for about 5-6 years, and I'm currently up to a pack a day.

I would definitely not quit if the test were in a 2 weeks or so, but do you think that I will still be experience the withdrawal symptoms eight weeks after quitting? Thanks for the help.

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Bert
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Bert » Tue Apr 13, 2010 4:01 pm

I would say quit after the LSAT. Quitting sucks, and it takes some time to get over nicotene. That being said, absolutely do not take Chantix so that you can quit before the exam. Chantix really fucks with your mind.

Z3RO
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Z3RO » Tue Apr 13, 2010 4:05 pm

honestabe84 wrote:
Z3RO wrote:I was a pack-a-day smoker myself when I started studying for the LSAT. About 2 months before the test, my girlfriend implored me to quit, saying she was scared that I was going to die early (I was a smoker for 5 years by then). I quit right then and haven't smoked since. I crushed the LSAT.

It's rough for a week, then it gets easier. If you really want to quit, you can do it. It will have no negative effect on your memory or ability to think clearly 2 months out. In fact, I was glad that i wasn't jonesing for a cig during the break in the test.


Ok. You are exactly like me. I've been smoking for about 5-6 years, and I'm currently up to a pack a day.

I would definitely not quit if the test were in a 2 weeks or so, but do you think that I will still be experience the withdrawal symptoms eight weeks after quitting? Thanks for the help.

If you're like me, you won't notice any difference other than not getting cranky/depending on smoking a cig that far after you quit. You'll continue to take practice tests for the coming weeks, so it's not like it'll be impossible for you to gauge it.

Have you tried quitting before? I "quit" about 4 times before I finally kicked it this time, each for only about a month at a time. I think the LSAT helped me quit, and quitting helped me on test day.

junelsat
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby junelsat » Tue Apr 13, 2010 4:07 pm

honestabe84 wrote:Am I crazy to consider quitting smoking two months before the LSAT? I've been sick, so I haven't smoked in two days, and I figured that this is the best time as any to quit.

I really want to quit, but I heard many people have a hard time when they quit. I certainly don't want to be going through mood swings and have tremendous stress when I'm about to take such an important test. So I guess I'm wondering if I should hold off until after the test or if it really doesn't matter that much. Any advice (especially from former smokers) would be appreciated?

FYI: This is the last time I can take the LSAT.


I quit a few years ago cold turkey after smoking for 5 years, you can do it no problem us a little nicorette gum and in 2 months you'll have no problem(although you might need some gum during the test on breaks)

GoBroncos22!
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby GoBroncos22! » Tue Apr 13, 2010 8:09 pm

In my opinion, I would NOT attempt to quit before the LSAT. I was a heavy chewer for about 3 years and was debating whether I should quit before but like you, did not want to be suffering through the withdrawals while trying to study. Then, the day after I took it I finished my last can and havnt touched it since and am glad I waited because the side effects kinda sucked major ass. If I was you-again, this is my opinion-I would wait

lsatntr
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby lsatntr » Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:57 am

honestabe84 wrote:
Shrimps wrote:For how long have you smoked?

The thing is, nicotine is a "study drug", not dissimilar from amphetamine (though weaker).

"At low doses, .... in brain reward systems." (wikipedia)


Well, you may have just convinced me to hold off on quitting until after the LSAT. I definitely don't want to risk my memory, attention span, or concentration.


And you may have just convinced me to take up cigarettes in hopes of super-concentration-and-memory powers. Time to blaze. 8)

Rosebud523
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Rosebud523 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:02 pm

I took the LSAT in September and tried quitting for a month over the summer. I have add and anxiety, so it was not a good thing for me. It made me really irritable and anxious while I was studying, and I was constantly picking at my fingers and shaking. Basically it was a huge distraction while trying to study because I was thinking about how badly I wanted one. I took the LSAT again in December and everything about my studying went better. My mind just worked differently. Although that is probably not from smoking, I do think that you don't want to change too many habits while you are studying because it just screws with you. Change always confuses your body and you do not need those extra distractions. Good luck!

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adora
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby adora » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:08 pm

I had smoked a pack a day for about 4 years, then quit smoking about 2 months before the LSAT. I was worried, too, but in the end, I'm so happy I had quit.

Yeah, it may impact your studying at first, but how much would cravings impact your test day performance?

Before I quit, my cravings were a lot worse when I was nervous...and it was hard for me to be in situations where I wouldn't be able to smoke for 4-5 hours.

Also, you'll be feeling a lot better within a week of quitting.

I'd say it's worth it-do it now. But totally a personal decision.

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Luis Gomez
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Luis Gomez » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:16 pm

Just Quit.

Z3RO
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby Z3RO » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:17 pm

adora wrote:I had smoked a pack a day for about 4 years, then quit smoking about 2 months before the LSAT. I was worried, too, but in the end, I'm so happy I had quit.

Yeah, it may impact your studying at first, but how much would cravings impact your test day performance?

Before I quit, my cravings were a lot worse when I was nervous...and it was hard for me to be in situations where I wouldn't be able to smoke for 4-5 hours.

Also, you'll be feeling a lot better within a week of quitting.

I'd say it's worth it-do it now. But totally a personal decision.

TITCR

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adora
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby adora » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:24 pm

Shrimps wrote:For how long have you smoked?

The thing is, nicotine is a "study drug", not dissimilar from amphetamine (though weaker).

"At low doses, nicotine potently enhances the actions of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain, causing a drug effect typical of those of psychostimulants. At higher doses, nicotine enhances the effect of serotonin and opiate activity, producing a calming, pain-killing effect. Nicotine is unique in comparison to most drugs, as its profile changes from stimulant to sedative/pain killer in increasing dosages and use. (Another drug that behaves similarly is ethanol.)... When a cigarette is smoked, nicotine-rich blood passes from the lungs to the brain within seven seconds and immediately stimulates the release of many chemical messengers including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin, arginine, dopamine, autocrine agents, and beta-endorphin.[30] This release of neurotransmitters and hormones is responsible for most of nicotine's effects. Nicotine appears to enhance concentration[31] and memory due to the increase of acetylcholine. It also appears to enhance alertness due to the increases of acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Arousal is increased by the increase of norepinephrine. Pain is reduced by the increases of acetylcholine and beta-endorphin. Anxiety is reduced by the increase of beta-endorphin. Nicotine also extends the duration of positive effects of dopamine[32] and increases sensitivity in brain reward systems." (wikipedia)

Further, recent research has found the NiQuitin/Nicabate 4mg lozenge has been clinically proven to help reverse nicotine withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking including the following: difficulty concentrating, attention deficit, short-term memory deficit and selective attention deficit(2) -- some of the issues at the core of yesterday's report.



I read some study on smokers' concentration after having a cigarette vs. craving a cigarette, etc...vs. non-smokers.

Yeah, nicotine helped the smokers' performance a lot...but cigarette cravings had very negative effects on concentration. And non-smokers performed just as well as smokers who had smoked.

I don't remember where I read this, so this is by no means reliable. But fwiw...

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adora
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby adora » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:25 pm

Bert wrote:I would say quit after the LSAT. Quitting sucks, and it takes some time to get over nicotene. That being said, absolutely do not take Chantix so that you can quit before the exam. Chantix really fucks with your mind.



Hah. I took Chantix. Yes, definitely fucks with your mind. Crazy dreams, and sometimes lots worse. But it worked wonders for me.

izzer
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby izzer » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:27 pm

adora wrote:
Shrimps wrote:For how long have you smoked?

The thing is, nicotine is a "study drug", not dissimilar from amphetamine (though weaker).

"At low doses, nicotine potently enhances the actions of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain, causing a drug effect typical of those of psychostimulants. At higher doses, nicotine enhances the effect of serotonin and opiate activity, producing a calming, pain-killing effect. Nicotine is unique in comparison to most drugs, as its profile changes from stimulant to sedative/pain killer in increasing dosages and use. (Another drug that behaves similarly is ethanol.)... When a cigarette is smoked, nicotine-rich blood passes from the lungs to the brain within seven seconds and immediately stimulates the release of many chemical messengers including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin, arginine, dopamine, autocrine agents, and beta-endorphin.[30] This release of neurotransmitters and hormones is responsible for most of nicotine's effects. Nicotine appears to enhance concentration[31] and memory due to the increase of acetylcholine. It also appears to enhance alertness due to the increases of acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Arousal is increased by the increase of norepinephrine. Pain is reduced by the increases of acetylcholine and beta-endorphin. Anxiety is reduced by the increase of beta-endorphin. Nicotine also extends the duration of positive effects of dopamine[32] and increases sensitivity in brain reward systems." (wikipedia)

Further, recent research has found the NiQuitin/Nicabate 4mg lozenge has been clinically proven to help reverse nicotine withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking including the following: difficulty concentrating, attention deficit, short-term memory deficit and selective attention deficit(2) -- some of the issues at the core of yesterday's report.



I read some study on smokers' concentration after having a cigarette vs. craving a cigarette, etc...vs. non-smokers.

Yeah, nicotine helped the smokers' performance a lot...but cigarette cravings had very negative effects on concentration. And non-smokers performed just as well as smokers who had smoked.

I don't remember where I read this, so this is by no means reliable. But fwiw...


Haha, I'm pretty sure this was in a LR section on a PT.

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adora
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby adora » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:49 pm

izzer wrote:
adora wrote:
Shrimps wrote:For how long have you smoked?

The thing is, nicotine is a "study drug", not dissimilar from amphetamine (though weaker).

"At low doses, nicotine potently enhances the actions of norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain, causing a drug effect typical of those of psychostimulants. At higher doses, nicotine enhances the effect of serotonin and opiate activity, producing a calming, pain-killing effect. Nicotine is unique in comparison to most drugs, as its profile changes from stimulant to sedative/pain killer in increasing dosages and use. (Another drug that behaves similarly is ethanol.)... When a cigarette is smoked, nicotine-rich blood passes from the lungs to the brain within seven seconds and immediately stimulates the release of many chemical messengers including acetylcholine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, vasopressin, arginine, dopamine, autocrine agents, and beta-endorphin.[30] This release of neurotransmitters and hormones is responsible for most of nicotine's effects. Nicotine appears to enhance concentration[31] and memory due to the increase of acetylcholine. It also appears to enhance alertness due to the increases of acetylcholine and norepinephrine. Arousal is increased by the increase of norepinephrine. Pain is reduced by the increases of acetylcholine and beta-endorphin. Anxiety is reduced by the increase of beta-endorphin. Nicotine also extends the duration of positive effects of dopamine[32] and increases sensitivity in brain reward systems." (wikipedia)

Further, recent research has found the NiQuitin/Nicabate 4mg lozenge has been clinically proven to help reverse nicotine withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting smoking including the following: difficulty concentrating, attention deficit, short-term memory deficit and selective attention deficit(2) -- some of the issues at the core of yesterday's report.



I read some study on smokers' concentration after having a cigarette vs. craving a cigarette, etc...vs. non-smokers.

Yeah, nicotine helped the smokers' performance a lot...but cigarette cravings had very negative effects on concentration. And non-smokers performed just as well as smokers who had smoked.

I don't remember where I read this, so this is by no means reliable. But fwiw...


Haha, I'm pretty sure this was in a LR section on a PT.


Hahah. You see? My concentration and memory are wonderful. And I haven't had a cigarette in a 9 months.

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174
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby 174 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:53 pm

I have asthma and had to quit about a month before because I was getting sick. I wouldn't recommend it, it sucked waiting outside of the test center without anything to do but worry.

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TheBigMediocre
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby TheBigMediocre » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:55 pm

Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit smoking cigarettes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyhaTQseKTQ

honestabe84
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Re: Quitting smoking two months before the LSAT?

Postby honestabe84 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:55 pm

174 wrote:I have asthma and had to quit about a month before because I was getting sick. I wouldn't recommend it, it sucked waiting outside of the test center without anything to do but worry.


One advantage of quitting, however, is that you don't have to worry about getting written up for smoking during the break. Technically, and this policy is often not enforced, you're not allowed to go outside during break.




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