While practicing for the LSAT...

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nonpareilpearl
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Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 11:42 pm

While practicing for the LSAT...

Postby nonpareilpearl » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:18 pm

...I've found that for more than a fair few of the reading comprehension problems I end up with two choices that seem (to me) to be equally correct. I'll usually just stare at them and then go with one or the other, but I have a hard time figuring out why one answer is "more" correct than the other. I saw that the PowerSeries books are good for logic, but what's the best way to overcome this problem with the reading comprehension?

Thanks!

cavebat2000
Posts: 238
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 12:08 pm

Re: While practicing for the LSAT...

Postby cavebat2000 » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:19 pm

nonpareilpearl wrote:...I've found that for more than a fair few of the reading comprehension problems I end up with two choices that seem (to me) to be equally correct. I'll usually just stare at them and then go with one or the other, but I have a hard time figuring out why one answer is "more" correct than the other. I saw that the PowerSeries books are good for logic, but what's the best way to overcome this problem with the reading comprehension?

Thanks!


This means you don't have enough information to know that one is more correct than the other. Try reading more closely or going back and rereading the part of the section relevant to the question.

bp colin
Posts: 167
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:08 pm

Re: While practicing for the LSAT...

Postby bp colin » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:32 pm

nonpareilpearl wrote:...I've found that for more than a fair few of the reading comprehension problems I end up with two choices that seem (to me) to be equally correct. I'll usually just stare at them and then go with one or the other, but I have a hard time figuring out why one answer is "more" correct than the other. I saw that the PowerSeries books are good for logic, but what's the best way to overcome this problem with the reading comprehension?

Thanks!


You want to get out of the habit of thinking about it in terms of what is "more correct." In spite of what it says at the beginning of each section, it really is the case that one AC is right, and 4 are inherently wrong. So with the ones in RC where this happens, when you go back to review them, try to figure out not only why the right one is right, but also why the wrong one is actually wrong. Because it's not just "less right" or anything.

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nonpareilpearl
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Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 11:42 pm

Re: While practicing for the LSAT...

Postby nonpareilpearl » Thu Apr 01, 2010 3:58 pm

bp colin wrote:You want to get out of the habit of thinking about it in terms of what is "more correct." In spite of what it says at the beginning of each section, it really is the case that one AC is right, and 4 are inherently wrong.


What's the best way to practice this? Is it something where I just have to practice, or is there a book (similar to the LGB) that is good for explaining why the correct answer is correct and the others are not?

bp colin
Posts: 167
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:08 pm

Re: While practicing for the LSAT...

Postby bp colin » Thu Apr 01, 2010 4:22 pm

nonpareilpearl wrote:
bp colin wrote:You want to get out of the habit of thinking about it in terms of what is "more correct." In spite of what it says at the beginning of each section, it really is the case that one AC is right, and 4 are inherently wrong.


What's the best way to practice this? Is it something where I just have to practice, or is there a book (similar to the LGB) that is good for explaining why the correct answer is correct and the others are not?


Well, the best way is to try to figure it out for yourself. If you can ascertain why the wrong one is actually wrong, and do it all by yourself, the lesson learned will stick with you much better. If you absolutely can't figure it out, then you want to turn to other resources, naturally. Getting a tutor who knows their stuff or taking a class where you have access to a teacher to ask these questions would be the best route, but obviously that's a ton of money, and if you're just having trouble with RC then it might be a waste to take a course. With our (blueprint's) online course you get access to an email helpline, but again that costs a whole lot more than a book. And again, overkill, if everything else is fine.

Good RC resources are somewhat lacking, which I think is partially due to the semi-ubiquitous belief that RC can't be taught (which is bullshit). As far as I know, there is no book that explains why the wrong ACs are wrong for every RC passage. You can ask here on TLS. It's free, but the responses might not be 100% reliable 100% of the time. Your best bet would be to find a really good tutor, and just use him or her for the really hard ones that you can't figure out. This would cut down on hours and price. I've tutored a ton of students, and the ones who prepare beforehand (coming in knowing what they have problems with and what is ok) get a shitload more bang for their buck.




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