STUDY TIPS: EXTRA or even WEIRD things that help you

Kuchulu
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Jun 26, 2008 1:44 am

STUDY TIPS: EXTRA or even WEIRD things that help you

Postby Kuchulu » Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:58 pm

I know there are a few posts floating around w/ great tips, I just wanted to start another one because there are 2 things that i've used over the past month that have DRASTICALLY helped me.

English is my 2nd language, I moved to this country when I was 14 years old so I've always had a weak spot when it comes to some classification, language understanding of "if ... then" and various other simple logic steps that are drilled into students in various ways throughout elementary school. Even after graduating from UCLA, I find myself using a dictionary to look up certain terms and all of a sudden have the problem I am working on make complete sense.

While my Blueprint Prep courses helped a lot, I have found myself memorizing key words that are indicating statements, etc. While the method of learning is great, I always found myself wanting to learn the concepts even more. I didn't want to just memorize things, I really wanted to understand the logic behind it. My search lead me to reading a book titled "Logic Made Easy: How to Know When Language Deceives you" http://www.amazon.com/Logic-Made-Easy-L ... 0393057488
This book did WONDERS for me, not only did it help me to better understand logical concepts BUT it also helped me understand WHY I was making some specific mistakes. Don't worry about buying it either, most libraries carry this book or can get a hold of it, so PLEASE consider checking out.

Another thing that has helped me with reviewing, memorizing, and reviewing the lessons that i've learned is by putting pretty much everything that I am learning on flashcards, BUT NOT JUST REGULAR flashcards... I downloaded a cheap application on my iphone called iflipr - But check this out, not only does it let me make my own flashcards (via my regular computer and their website) but it also lets me search their database for similar flashcards. For example type the word "LSAT" and you get dozens of matches, and good flashcards that you can download from other users for FREE. You can even add images/sounds to the flashcards... although I have not used those features.

Having the flahscards has made life SO MUCH easier, now I review various LR sections whenever I am bored, waiting in line, taking the train/bus, wherever I have more than 5 minutes. I even review a few minutes in bed, etc.

I've done a few others things, but I think that these 2 things have had the greatest impact.

What are some non-conventional stuff that you've tried or read?

waxecstatic
Posts: 314
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 7:07 pm

Re: STUDY TIPS: EXTRA or even WEIRD things that help you

Postby waxecstatic » Tue Mar 16, 2010 8:48 pm

Kuchulu wrote:I know there are a few posts floating around w/ great tips, I just wanted to start another one because there are 2 things that i've used over the past month that have DRASTICALLY helped me.

English is my 2nd language, I moved to this country when I was 14 years old so I've always had a weak spot when it comes to some classification, language understanding of "if ... then" and various other simple logic steps that are drilled into students in various ways throughout elementary school. Even after graduating from UCLA, I find myself using a dictionary to look up certain terms and all of a sudden have the problem I am working on make complete sense.

While my Blueprint Prep courses helped a lot, I have found myself memorizing key words that are indicating statements, etc. While the method of learning is great, I always found myself wanting to learn the concepts even more. I didn't want to just memorize things, I really wanted to understand the logic behind it. My search lead me to reading a book titled "Logic Made Easy: How to Know When Language Deceives you" http://www.amazon.com/Logic-Made-Easy-L ... 0393057488
This book did WONDERS for me, not only did it help me to better understand logical concepts BUT it also helped me understand WHY I was making some specific mistakes. Don't worry about buying it either, most libraries carry this book or can get a hold of it, so PLEASE consider checking out.

Another thing that has helped me with reviewing, memorizing, and reviewing the lessons that i've learned is by putting pretty much everything that I am learning on flashcards, BUT NOT JUST REGULAR flashcards... I downloaded a cheap application on my iphone called iflipr - But check this out, not only does it let me make my own flashcards (via my regular computer and their website) but it also lets me search their database for similar flashcards. For example type the word "LSAT" and you get dozens of matches, and good flashcards that you can download from other users for FREE. You can even add images/sounds to the flashcards... although I have not used those features.

Having the flahscards has made life SO MUCH easier, now I review various LR sections whenever I am bored, waiting in line, taking the train/bus, wherever I have more than 5 minutes. I even review a few minutes in bed, etc.

I've done a few others things, but I think that these 2 things have had the greatest impact.

What are some non-conventional stuff that you've tried or read?


Generally flashcards are helpful when it is necessary to memorize things, and usually this is when there are only minute differences between terms. In LR, there really aren't any categories that are very similar to others with the possible exception of strengthening/justify the conclusion/assumption. But think of it like this: strengthening 1-100% helping the conclusion, justify will be added to the premises, and an assumption is made before the argument is even developed. Assumption must be true in order for the argument to be true. And JTC is "if this is true", the conclusion must be true.

But on a more important note, the LR is very straightforward and isn't the least bit esoteric. The only hard thing about LR is not getting fooled by the presence or lack of presence of certainty/probability indicators. I don't see the use in making flashcards, but if it works for you, then go for it.

Good luck to you on the LSAT.

makingwaves
Posts: 115
Joined: Sat Nov 21, 2009 11:04 am

Re: STUDY TIPS: EXTRA or even WEIRD things that help you

Postby makingwaves » Wed Mar 17, 2010 8:27 am

You mentioned looking up things you don't know in the dictionary -- I do that moreso with RC than with LR. I make a list from things I read either online, for example in The Economist and even sometimes the Wall Street Journal. I've been using those websites once a day for just 15 mins to help improve my RC skills and will finish the article and just jot down what I thought the main point was and how the author felt about it (2 common questions on RC sections it seems). Then, i'll take my list of words I don't know and look them all up at the end of the week. It sounds silly and at the beginning I used to feel like I should know what some of the words mean or I should be able to figure them out, but once I got past that I started to see some improvements, so I recommend that for sure.

pattymac
Posts: 210
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 7:44 pm

Re: STUDY TIPS: EXTRA or even WEIRD things that help you

Postby pattymac » Wed Mar 17, 2010 8:32 am

waxecstatic wrote:
Kuchulu wrote:I know there are a few posts floating around w/ great tips, I just wanted to start another one because there are 2 things that i've used over the past month that have DRASTICALLY helped me.

English is my 2nd language, I moved to this country when I was 14 years old so I've always had a weak spot when it comes to some classification, language understanding of "if ... then" and various other simple logic steps that are drilled into students in various ways throughout elementary school. Even after graduating from UCLA, I find myself using a dictionary to look up certain terms and all of a sudden have the problem I am working on make complete sense.

While my Blueprint Prep courses helped a lot, I have found myself memorizing key words that are indicating statements, etc. While the method of learning is great, I always found myself wanting to learn the concepts even more. I didn't want to just memorize things, I really wanted to understand the logic behind it. My search lead me to reading a book titled "Logic Made Easy: How to Know When Language Deceives you" http://www.amazon.com/Logic-Made-Easy-L ... 0393057488
This book did WONDERS for me, not only did it help me to better understand logical concepts BUT it also helped me understand WHY I was making some specific mistakes. Don't worry about buying it either, most libraries carry this book or can get a hold of it, so PLEASE consider checking out.

Another thing that has helped me with reviewing, memorizing, and reviewing the lessons that i've learned is by putting pretty much everything that I am learning on flashcards, BUT NOT JUST REGULAR flashcards... I downloaded a cheap application on my iphone called iflipr - But check this out, not only does it let me make my own flashcards (via my regular computer and their website) but it also lets me search their database for similar flashcards. For example type the word "LSAT" and you get dozens of matches, and good flashcards that you can download from other users for FREE. You can even add images/sounds to the flashcards... although I have not used those features.

Having the flahscards has made life SO MUCH easier, now I review various LR sections whenever I am bored, waiting in line, taking the train/bus, wherever I have more than 5 minutes. I even review a few minutes in bed, etc.

I've done a few others things, but I think that these 2 things have had the greatest impact.

What are some non-conventional stuff that you've tried or read?


Generally flashcards are helpful when it is necessary to memorize things, and usually this is when there are only minute differences between terms. In LR, there really aren't any categories that are very similar to others with the possible exception of strengthening/justify the conclusion/assumption. But think of it like this: strengthening 1-100% helping the conclusion, justify will be added to the premises, and an assumption is made before the argument is even developed. Assumption must be true in order for the argument to be true. And JTC is "if this is true", the conclusion must be true.

But on a more important note, the LR is very straightforward and isn't the least bit esoteric. The only hard thing about LR is not getting fooled by the presence or lack of presence of certainty/probability indicators. I don't see the use in making flashcards, but if it works for you, then go for it.

Good luck to you on the LSAT.


I've got to disagree with you on the esoteric part. I took a logic class on flaws, aced the class and now I rarely miss a flaw question whereas before they were one of my weaker spots. Three answer choices are almost always completely bogus on flaw questions. Before I knew what an ad hominem or division fallacy were, I would always get these questions wrong 90% of the time. I'd imagine that philosophy majors have some (albeit a tiny) advantage in this regard.




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