june test difficulty

tsbotros
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june test difficulty

Postby tsbotros » Sun Mar 07, 2010 3:34 pm

Do you think the June test will be easier, more difficult, or the same, as the last 2 tests (December and February)

Shrimps
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Shrimps » Sun Mar 07, 2010 3:43 pm

The February curve is not known, the December curve was the most generous in years (-14). Really, don't expect it to get out of the usual -11 ± 1 range for June. It might, but the chances are slim.

Sandro
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Sandro » Sun Mar 07, 2010 4:41 pm

-29 curve

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theavrock
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby theavrock » Sun Mar 07, 2010 4:47 pm

Definitely easier. The June tests are always easier. Didn't you know??

Come on, how can anyone predict how easy or hard a particular test is going to be. :roll:

Sandro
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Sandro » Sun Mar 07, 2010 4:51 pm

I think the fact that the test is at 1230 or later will improve my score by atleast 5 points. I'm not kidding. at all.

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quasi-stellar
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby quasi-stellar » Sun Mar 07, 2010 8:01 pm

It really doesnt matter whether it is going to be easier or harder. All tests are equated, so the score you will get will most likely reflect your best ability.

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whuts4lunch
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby whuts4lunch » Sun Mar 07, 2010 8:14 pm

I think it all comes down to the games (unless you always -0). If you get games that happen to click, you are that much more likely to perform towards the top of your scoring range.

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Thomas Jefferson
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Thomas Jefferson » Sun Mar 07, 2010 8:26 pm

quasi-stellar wrote:It really doesnt matter whether it is going to be easier or harder. All tests are equated, so the score you will get will most likely reflect your best ability.


This is, of course, the obvious response, and the one that always surfaces when people ask questions such as this. However, I've always wondered if the population of test-takers is different for the different tests. It's probably random, but would it really be that surprising if the gunners took it in June and the slackers waited until December, for example? One possible way to measure this would be the average or median GPA of the test-takers for each sitting. I don't know if such data is available, but I've always wondered.

tsbotros
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby tsbotros » Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:37 pm

You do not need to know the curve of the test to be able to determine whether it was difficult or not. I feel the December and February test were harder than usual (and I think the average person would agree). Has there ever been a trend to have three difficult tests in a row? What makes the last two tests more difficult then the average LSAT is the greater difficulty of the logic games section. So i guess another question i have is, has anyone felt that three tests in a row had a difficult logic games section?

jarofsoup
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby jarofsoup » Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:48 pm

Just take 57, 58, 59 and you will have a good idea. It will be easier if you are prepared, and hard as hell if you are not.

I think it will be easier for me personally because it starts latter in the day, so i can go to bed latter and thus sleep better.

JasonR
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby JasonR » Mon Mar 08, 2010 5:37 pm

Shrimps wrote:The February curve is not known, the December curve was the most generous in years (-14). Really, don't expect it to get out of the usual -11 ± 1 range for June. It might, but the chances are slim.


What does the "curve" (not really a curve) have to do with answering the OP's question?

JasonR
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby JasonR » Mon Mar 08, 2010 5:40 pm

Thomas Jefferson wrote:
quasi-stellar wrote:It really doesnt matter whether it is going to be easier or harder. All tests are equated, so the score you will get will most likely reflect your best ability.


This is, of course, the obvious response, and the one that always surfaces when people ask questions such as this. However, I've always wondered if the population of test-takers is different for the different tests. It's probably random, but would it really be that surprising if the gunners took it in June and the slackers waited until December, for example? One possible way to measure this would be the average or median GPA of the test-takers for each sitting. I don't know if such data is available, but I've always wondered.


The populations could be different, but of what relevance is that? Differences in test-taking populations have no impact on the equating process.

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Thomas Jefferson
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Thomas Jefferson » Mon Mar 08, 2010 5:50 pm

JasonR wrote:
Thomas Jefferson wrote:
quasi-stellar wrote:It really doesnt matter whether it is going to be easier or harder. All tests are equated, so the score you will get will most likely reflect your best ability.


This is, of course, the obvious response, and the one that always surfaces when people ask questions such as this. However, I've always wondered if the population of test-takers is different for the different tests. It's probably random, but would it really be that surprising if the gunners took it in June and the slackers waited until December, for example? One possible way to measure this would be the average or median GPA of the test-takers for each sitting. I don't know if such data is available, but I've always wondered.


The populations could be different, but of what relevance is that? Differences in test-taking populations have no impact on the equating process.


If one population is smarter/dumber (or, more precisely, better/worse at the LSAT), then the curve for one test would be easier than for another (differences in the tests themselves would be cancelled out by the equating). Therefore, it would be easier to get the same score by taking the test when the weaker population takes the test than when the stronger population does.

Edit: Tying this to the OP's question, if the June test is taken by more/less skilled test-takers, the June test would be relatively harder/easier than the ones administered in other months.

bwbutterfield
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby bwbutterfield » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:00 pm

Isn't the curve predetermined before the test is given? It is not a normal curve. That was my understanding anyways.

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quasi-stellar
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby quasi-stellar » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:59 pm

bwbutterfield wrote:Isn't the curve predetermined before the test is given? It is not a normal curve. That was my understanding anyways.


I think so too. Every time LSAC administers a test it has a pretty good idea of the questions difficulty.
They analyze that information through the experimental sections.

JasonR
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby JasonR » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:36 pm

Thomas Jefferson wrote:
JasonR wrote:
Thomas Jefferson wrote:
quasi-stellar wrote:It really doesnt matter whether it is going to be easier or harder. All tests are equated, so the score you will get will most likely reflect your best ability.


This is, of course, the obvious response, and the one that always surfaces when people ask questions such as this. However, I've always wondered if the population of test-takers is different for the different tests. It's probably random, but would it really be that surprising if the gunners took it in June and the slackers waited until December, for example? One possible way to measure this would be the average or median GPA of the test-takers for each sitting. I don't know if such data is available, but I've always wondered.


The populations could be different, but of what relevance is that? Differences in test-taking populations have no impact on the equating process.


If one population is smarter/dumber (or, more precisely, better/worse at the LSAT), then the curve for one test would be easier than for another (differences in the tests themselves would be cancelled out by the equating). Therefore, it would be easier to get the same score by taking the test when the weaker population takes the test than when the stronger population does.

Edit: Tying this to the OP's question, if the June test is taken by more/less skilled test-takers, the June test would be relatively harder/easier than the ones administered in other months.


No, this is entirely wrong. You simply don't understand how the LSAC sets the scoring scales for its tests. The test is not curved. The scoring scale is determined before the test is administered.

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Thomas Jefferson
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Thomas Jefferson » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:44 pm

JasonR wrote: No, this is entirely wrong. You simply don't understand how the LSAC sets the scoring scales for its tests. The test is not curved. The scoring scale is determined before the test is administered.



LSAC sets it so that the X percentile on the administration of the test = Y score, no? If the people taking the test are weaker test-takers, should it not be easier to score in X percentile and thus attain Y score? Where am I going wrong or what am I missing?

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Richie Tenenbaum
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:48 pm

Thomas Jefferson wrote:
JasonR wrote: No, this is entirely wrong. You simply don't understand how the LSAC sets the scoring scales for its tests. The test is not curved. The scoring scale is determined before the test is administered.



LSAC sets it so that the X percentile on the administration of the test = Y score, no? If the people taking the test are weaker test-takers, should it not be easier to score in X percentile and thus attain Y score? Where am I going wrong or what am I missing?


Percentile rank is based on the last 3 years of test takers. The curve is established beforehand based on experimental section results. They might tinker with the it a little after, but adjusting due to the "strength" of the group taking that specific test is not what the curve is about.

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Thomas Jefferson
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Re: june test difficulty

Postby Thomas Jefferson » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:57 pm

Richie Tenenbaum wrote: Percentile rank is based on the last 3 years of test takers. The curve is established beforehand based on experimental section results. They might tinker with the it a little after, but adjusting due to the "strength" of the group taking that specific test is not what the curve is about.


Thanks for the clarification, Richie.




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