How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

skip james
Posts: 264
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 2:53 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby skip james » Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:30 pm

FreeGuy wrote:
dextermorgan wrote:Step one is to stop posting about it on TLS. :lol:


Haha. Yeah, some people out there were raised by wolves.

--ImageRemoved--


I am a one-man wolf pack.

User avatar
typ3
Posts: 1362
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 12:04 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby typ3 » Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:36 pm

skip james wrote:
FreeGuy wrote:
dextermorgan wrote:Step one is to stop posting about it on TLS. :lol:


Haha. Yeah, some people out there were raised by wolves.

--ImageRemoved--


I am a one-man wolf pack.



Would you like to join my wolf pack?

User avatar
BigA
Posts: 448
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 7:22 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby BigA » Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:18 am

Would a company care which company's methods you used and are familiar with? For example if you read the Powerscore bibles and always used their methods, would getting a job at Kaplan or some place be a problem?

User avatar
Stringer Bell
Posts: 1914
Joined: Wed Oct 21, 2009 9:43 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby Stringer Bell » Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:33 am

I haven't read all the replies, so my apologies if this has already been covered, but I believe you need a 172+ to work for Powerscore.

tomwatts
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby tomwatts » Wed Mar 10, 2010 3:16 am

BigA wrote:Would a company care which company's methods you used and are familiar with? For example if you read the Powerscore bibles and always used their methods, would getting a job at Kaplan or some place be a problem?

For us (Princeton Review), I don't care what methods you used as long as you teach with Princeton Review terminology. Well, with MY terminology, Princeton Review or not. I imagine that other trainers with us feel the same way.

User avatar
BigA
Posts: 448
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 7:22 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby BigA » Wed Mar 10, 2010 3:32 am

Also, regarding your score, would they just look at your overall score or do they consider how you do in each section? For example, I would think they wouldnt want someone who's not that good at games, but makes up for it in the other three sections. Right?

tomwatts
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby tomwatts » Wed Mar 10, 2010 3:40 am

If you're scoring 98th percentile or above, you can't be that bad at anything. I doubt anyone looks any deeper than the total number.

The way we root out any imbalance is by having potential teachers teach sample lessons from the three different subjects.

User avatar
suspicious android
Posts: 938
Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2010 4:54 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby suspicious android » Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:34 am

BigA wrote:Also, regarding your score, would they just look at your overall score or do they consider how you do in each section? For example, I would think they wouldnt want someone who's not that good at games, but makes up for it in the other three sections. Right?


I'm much weaker at games than at other sections, and my score report makes that pretty clear, but it didn't seem to be an issue when I interviewed. I think games are easier to teach though. After you've taught a game 5-6 times, you see every single possible angle, you can probably anticipate just about any problem anyone could have with it. With LR and especially RC, no matter how many times I teach a lesson, someone will ask me something new that I had never previously considered and I have to be really on top of it to answer that question adequately.

User avatar
Atlas LSAT Teacher
Posts: 283
Joined: Tue May 12, 2009 10:18 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby Atlas LSAT Teacher » Thu Mar 11, 2010 12:14 am

skip james wrote:My personal thoughts: I think the way to go is Atlas, from a money only perspective.

From a compensation package point of view, Atlas > Blueprint/Kaplan/PR > TM > PS. I'd be iffy about Atlas though, since they are newer and even with 100/hr, I'd be concerned about having a decent number of hours.

We're actually very eager to find some more great teachers to lighten the load on others and/or open us up in new locations. We're particularly interested in DC, Philadelphia, NYC and LA, so if any teachers are out there with 99th percentile scores and some real teaching chops, check out the audition process and if you're game, submit a resume and cover letter. Here's the info: http://www.atlaslsat.com/resume_post.cfm

bp colin
Posts: 167
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:08 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby bp colin » Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:28 pm

I teach for Blueprint so I thought I'd chime in. Starting pay is $60 an hour for teaching, which is pretty high, but it's even more substantial when you consider that the course is 100 hours. So teaching one class pays like 6k. I think we're the best for teachers because pay is higher than the big national companies, and you get more hours than at the other boutiquey places. And it's a pretty fucking fun job. And you rarely have to wake up before 4pm. You need a 170 to get in the door, but whether or not you get hired is all based on your teaching ability. I remember at my training there were people who had 178+ scores and were terrible, while there were 170-172 people who were awesome. I think most companies are like this; as long as you're above the threshold, your score stops meaning much of anything.

Everyone has to be good at both teaching and tutoring, but there are definitely people who do mostly just one or the other. Tutoring is 50/hr.

lawschoollll
Posts: 468
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 2:57 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby lawschoollll » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:24 am

Can you do it part-time? Like, if I have a FT job, can I teach classes that start at like 6pm (like the class I took) or weekend classes ?

InsertCleverName
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:09 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby InsertCleverName » Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:51 pm

If I can just shift the topic slightly, has anyone taught LSAT while attending law school? I'm kind of thinking it might be worth doing 10-20 hours a week and am curious how it worked out for everyone.

User avatar
Nikrall
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2008 8:25 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby Nikrall » Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:54 pm

InsertCleverName wrote:If I can just shift the topic slightly, has anyone taught LSAT while attending law school? I'm kind of thinking it might be worth doing 10-20 hours a week and am curious how it worked out for everyone.


I taught all through law school. It sucked. I'd recommend against it unless you don't care about grades.

User avatar
3|ink
Posts: 7331
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:23 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby 3|ink » Sun Jul 11, 2010 2:24 am

typ3 wrote:
skip james wrote:
typ3 wrote:What about Blueprint? They settle their suit?


They say they did, but TM is saying otherwise. I doubt it really matters, Blueprint has a sizable market share now, I think they've hit the point of no return, and are bound to become one of the staples of the LSAT prep test industry.



Found the judgement filed june 15, 2009. BP was ordered to pay $183,000 in damages. Less than the 18,000,000 TM was suing them for. I decided not to go with them after viewing them on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2q5t8RR5vI

My favorite is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmBGY0fY ... re=related

facepalm


I hear the BP course and teachers are cool enough, but these depositions are pretty damning. Personally, I think that links to all of these videos should be sticked under a thread titled 'For fucking shame'.

Audio Technica Guy
Posts: 317
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 5:21 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Sun Jul 11, 2010 6:50 am

Nikrall wrote:
InsertCleverName wrote:If I can just shift the topic slightly, has anyone taught LSAT while attending law school? I'm kind of thinking it might be worth doing 10-20 hours a week and am curious how it worked out for everyone.


I taught all through law school. It sucked. I'd recommend against it unless you don't care about grades.


I tutored some here and there (didn't teach any classes though) and it was mostly fine.

Audio Technica Guy
Posts: 317
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2010 5:21 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Sun Jul 11, 2010 8:12 am

I'll try to add a few things to What Tom said about TPR.

TPR has pluses and minuses. The hourly rate for purely teaching is lower to start off with. As others have said, that's probably because TPR is bad at advertising the job. Like horrendously bad. They don't understand that people don't end up looking at your "effective rate" and count in that they pay for training and prep, where most of their competitors don't. Your first hyperlearning class, you get to claim the same number of prep hours as the course runs (which is 84 hours total). Then if you do an accelerated class, you would also get to claim half the hours that course runs (class runs 28 hours, you get to claim 14). Considering most people will, at some point, teach both that means you get paid $907 to prep materials. Then add in your pay for training, which is on average $324 and having an extra $1231 is a pretty sizable "bonus" that many people evaluating the jobs don't really consider, or even know about. If you're smart about it, you can pick up some proctoring gigs early on (Which pay $10 and hour) and "double dip". That is get paid to proctor tests while prepping your materials, at which point you're effectively getting paid $18 per hour to prep. It's kind of funny that my office can always tell when I want to do some admin paper work (which you get paid for) or work some new material up, because I always proctor stuff (which I normally don't even proctor my own tests).

TPR also seems to give more raises to its teachers than other companies I've seen (if you do a good job). Within the first year of being there, I went from $18 to $25 base rate ($23 to $28 for tutoring).

If you're willing to cross-train (teach multiple test types, let's be honest, anybody can teach GRE, SAT and ACT), the potential for working a lot of hours is definitely there, especially if you live in a big market. In my office we have teachers who teach like 56 hours per year, and teachers who are essentially full time employees that make well over $60K. (you also get paid $10 per hour for training if you're cross training)

There are also marketing events, where you give and go over the free practice tests or talk about strategy or all of the above. Those pay your teaching rate and if you get any students to sign up for your course, you get a $50 enrollment bonus. I've done some of those where I got 8 students to sign up and I pocketed a nice $400 bonus.

TPR also has what seems like more opportunity for "advancement" than other companies. If you do a great job you can become a master trainer within a couple of years with the company. Where they essentially fly you around the country all expenses paid and pay you between $35 and $60 per hour to impart your knowledge on your future minions who will be telling your jokes.

You can quite easily wrangle a part-time or full time office job if you want. Right now I'm part of our operations team, which gives me a 35K base salary, plus the 25-30K I make teaching. It can be a little hectic doing that at times, but it can also be a nice steady paycheck when classes aren't running. Teachers also quite frequently become operations managers or even executive directors at our offices. These sort of options may be totally unappealing for some, but I don't think they should be ignored in a down economy.

So, I think the biggest advantage to TPR is that really, you can turn it into just about whatever kind of job you want and it can even be different kinds of jobs at different times. There have been times when it's just been a very small source of supplemental income, there have been times when I didn't do anything there at all for stretches, there have been times where it's provided me with a respectable income by itself (such as now).

tomwatts
Posts: 1551
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:01 am

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby tomwatts » Sun Jul 11, 2010 12:39 pm

As I've pointed out on a few other topics, what Audio Technica Guy mentions is the reason that I stay with TPR even though people always say that the pay rate is lower than other companies'. The starting pay rate is lower. I've paid my dues now, and I've gotten enough raises and promotions that there's no way I'd make as much money anywhere else, and I'm still not done rising in the company.

Endgames
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2010 2:47 pm

Re: How to become an LSAT tutor for a company?

Postby Endgames » Tue Aug 03, 2010 10:11 pm

bp colin wrote:I teach for Blueprint so I thought I'd chime in. Starting pay is $60 an hour for teaching, which is pretty high, but it's even more substantial when you consider that the course is 100 hours. So teaching one class pays like 6k. I think we're the best for teachers because pay is higher than the big national companies, and you get more hours than at the other boutiquey places. And it's a pretty fucking fun job. And you rarely have to wake up before 4pm. You need a 170 to get in the door, but whether or not you get hired is all based on your teaching ability. I remember at my training there were people who had 178+ scores and were terrible, while there were 170-172 people who were awesome. I think most companies are like this; as long as you're above the threshold, your score stops meaning much of anything.

Everyone has to be good at both teaching and tutoring, but there are definitely people who do mostly just one or the other. Tutoring is 50/hr.


I know this thread hasn't really been touched for a while, but I was wondering for classes such as these, what are the hours like per week. For example for Blueprint, would you be working a lot while there was a class or could it be like ten fifteen hours a week? Thanks.




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: jagerbom79 and 10 guests