Reading Comp passages of the past and now

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jnjohn05
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Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby jnjohn05 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:36 am

I'm currently working on mastering my approach to the Reading Comp portion of the test, and I'm practicing with the Actual Set (PT's #7-18) and I find them kinda tough (generally much different then the passages listed in the Powerscore Reading Comp Bible). Has anyone else noticed this as well? Or am I the only one? Or, should I focus more time on the more recent PT's to get ready for the test?

Thanks in advance.

Shrimps
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby Shrimps » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:49 am

Don't assume you won't get hit with a bit of deconstructionist literary criticism for your RC.

The artist uses sameness upon spatial and temporal heterogenity for multiple
narratives and identity to confront the norm / status quo of globalised normativity with
analytical, synthecical and organic formulation of relational grouping. The symbolic order is blocked by
proposing a different and personal views upon the visible and the invisible by the single body as filter
towards one ore multiple cultural references. [4],[5] .In Merleau-Ponty´s phenomenology of perception
(first published in French in 1945), he developed the concept of the body-subject as an alternative to the
Cartesian "cogito." This distinction is especially important in that Merleau-Ponty perceives the essences
of the world existentially, as opposed to the Cartesian idea that the world is merely an extension of our
own minds. Consciousness, the world, and the human body as a perceiving thing are intricately
intertwined and mutually "engaged." The phenomenal thing is not the unchanging object of the natural
sciences, but a correlate of our body and its sensorimotor functions. Taking up and coinciding with the
sensible qualities it encounters, the body as incarnated subjectivity intentionally reconstructs things
within an ever-present world frame, through use of its preconscious, prepredicative understanding of the
world's makeup. Things are that upon which our body has a "grip" (prise), while the grip itself is a
function of our connaturality with the world's things.

The essential paradigm of cyberspace is creating partially situated identities out of actual or potential social reality in terms of canonical forms of human contact, thus renormalizing the phenomenology of narrative space and requiring the naturalization of the intersubjective cognitive strategy, and thereby resolving the dialectics of metaphorical thoughts, each problematic to the other, collectively redefining and reifying the paradigm of the parable of the model of the metaphor.
Last edited by Shrimps on Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:59 am, edited 2 times in total.

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vespertiliovir
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby vespertiliovir » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:57 am

It's funny that you should say that, because popular opinion on here is that RC has gotten more difficult in recent years.

This definitely varies from person to person, though. If you're concerned about the difference either way, maybe looking at some newer tests (now that you have the basic format/approach down) would be a good idea.

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jnjohn05
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby jnjohn05 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:04 am

I've browsed through the opinions here on the forum, and I've noticed that opinion come up several times. How does one go about being able to digest highly-dense material such as this? The passages shrimps posted seems like it comes from The Architect (character from The Matrix 2).

Dammit, just when I thought I had the LSAT in the bag (LR and LG solid).

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EdmundBurke23
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby EdmundBurke23 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:06 am

The general consensus is that the newer passages are significantly more difficult; I've seen a lot of people state that they've become even more "dense." But this is might just be a matter of opinion.

I personally haven't taken all of the newer passges yet, but the passages used on RCB were definitely easier than the 7-20 passages that I've done so far.

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vespertiliovir
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby vespertiliovir » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:09 am

jnjohn05 wrote:How does one go about being able to digest highly-dense material such as this?

Meh, just practice -- you'll get the hang of it :)
Some people recommend practicing by reading dense, fact-filled material like the Economist or scientific journals. I never tried this personally, but it seems like it could be helpful to some. But your main focus should be on real-deal LSAT passages.

Shrimps
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby Shrimps » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:16 am

NOBODY writes as badly as modern literary critics. The Economist is a mass market magazine. Expecting it to improve your reading skills is ridiculous.

Again, you need to read peer-reviewed magazines. Anthropological, sociological, law- and government-related, etc. And if the relevance of anthropological and sociological magazines for your future profession can be debated, the usefulness of being introduced to modern legal and political thought now, before you start law school/career, is, I think, quite apparent.

And, if you're lucky in one of those you might run across an article that will be used by LSAC for the June test :)

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EdmundBurke23
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby EdmundBurke23 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:29 am

Shrimps wrote:Don't assume you won't get hit with a bit of deconstructionist literary criticism for your RC.

The artist uses sameness upon spatial and temporal heterogenity for multiple
narratives and identity to confront the norm / status quo of globalised normativity with
analytical, synthecical and organic formulation of relational grouping. The symbolic order is blocked by
proposing a different and personal views upon the visible and the invisible by the single body as filter
towards one ore multiple cultural references. [4],[5] .In Merleau-Ponty´s phenomenology of perception
(first published in French in 1945), he developed the concept of the body-subject as an alternative to the
Cartesian "cogito." This distinction is especially important in that Merleau-Ponty perceives the essences
of the world existentially, as opposed to the Cartesian idea that the world is merely an extension of our
own minds. Consciousness, the world, and the human body as a perceiving thing are intricately
intertwined and mutually "engaged." The phenomenal thing is not the unchanging object of the natural
sciences, but a correlate of our body and its sensorimotor functions. Taking up and coinciding with the
sensible qualities it encounters, the body as incarnated subjectivity intentionally reconstructs things
within an ever-present world frame, through use of its preconscious, prepredicative understanding of the
world's makeup. Things are that upon which our body has a "grip" (prise), while the grip itself is a
function of our connaturality with the world's things.

The essential paradigm of cyberspace is creating partially situated identities out of actual or potential social reality in terms of canonical forms of human contact, thus renormalizing the phenomenology of narrative space and requiring the naturalization of the intersubjective cognitive strategy, and thereby resolving the dialectics of metaphorical thoughts, each problematic to the other, collectively redefining and reifying the paradigm of the parable of the model of the metaphor.



Is this an RC passage?

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FreeGuy
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby FreeGuy » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:37 am

EdmundBurke23 wrote:Is this an RC passage?


Most definitely NOT, although the LSAT has had a few passages about deconstructionism.

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jnjohn05
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby jnjohn05 » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:53 am

EdmundBurke23 wrote:
Shrimps wrote:Don't assume you won't get hit with a bit of deconstructionist literary criticism for your RC.

The artist uses sameness upon spatial and temporal heterogenity for multiple
narratives and identity to confront the norm / status quo of globalised normativity with
analytical, synthecical and organic formulation of relational grouping. The symbolic order is blocked by
proposing a different and personal views upon the visible and the invisible by the single body as filter
towards one ore multiple cultural references. [4],[5] .In Merleau-Ponty´s phenomenology of perception
(first published in French in 1945), he developed the concept of the body-subject as an alternative to the
Cartesian "cogito." This distinction is especially important in that Merleau-Ponty perceives the essences
of the world existentially, as opposed to the Cartesian idea that the world is merely an extension of our
own minds. Consciousness, the world, and the human body as a perceiving thing are intricately
intertwined and mutually "engaged." The phenomenal thing is not the unchanging object of the natural
sciences, but a correlate of our body and its sensorimotor functions. Taking up and coinciding with the
sensible qualities it encounters, the body as incarnated subjectivity intentionally reconstructs things
within an ever-present world frame, through use of its preconscious, prepredicative understanding of the
world's makeup. Things are that upon which our body has a "grip" (prise), while the grip itself is a
function of our connaturality with the world's things.

The essential paradigm of cyberspace is creating partially situated identities out of actual or potential social reality in terms of canonical forms of human contact, thus renormalizing the phenomenology of narrative space and requiring the naturalization of the intersubjective cognitive strategy, and thereby resolving the dialectics of metaphorical thoughts, each problematic to the other, collectively redefining and reifying the paradigm of the parable of the model of the metaphor.



Is this an RC passage?


Thank God it isn't. Anyway, I'll def need to drill RC into my mind prior to June. Everyone thanks for the support. And Shrimps thanks for scaring me (j/k).

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DGLitcH
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby DGLitcH » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:07 pm

Shrimps wrote:NOBODY writes as badly as modern literary critics. The Economist is a mass market magazine. Expecting it to improve your reading skills is ridiculous.

Again, you need to read peer-reviewed magazines. Anthropological, sociological, law- and government-related, etc. And if the relevance of anthropological and sociological magazines for your future profession can be debated, the usefulness of being introduced to modern legal and political thought now, before you start law school/career, is, I think, quite apparent.

And, if you're lucky in one of those you might run across an article that will be used by LSAC for the June test :)


Any recommendation on good peer-reviewed magazines to read that will be helpful for RC?

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T14_Scholly
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby T14_Scholly » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:15 pm

Shrimps wrote:NOBODY writes as badly as modern literary critics. The Economist is a mass market magazine. Expecting it to improve your reading skills is ridiculous.

Again, you need to read peer-reviewed magazines. Anthropological, sociological, law- and government-related, etc. And if the relevance of anthropological and sociological magazines for your future profession can be debated, the usefulness of being introduced to modern legal and political thought now, before you start law school/career, is, I think, quite apparent.

And, if you're lucky in one of those you might run across an article that will be used by LSAC for the June test :)


That The Economist is a mass market magazine doesn't automatically disqualify it. It's very dense and pretty much every article advances a cogent, in-depth argument.

Shrimps
Posts: 271
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:04 pm

Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby Shrimps » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:56 pm

Um. The Economist has a rather breezy, very "journalistic" style which for the most part rarely has parallels in the snippets of academic articles found on the LSAT.

DGLitcH - if you're in college, you probably have free access to jstor.org. I'd recommend starting there, doing a search on some legal topics, finding some articles that interest you, and going from there.

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T14_Scholly
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby T14_Scholly » Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:03 pm

I'd call this article typical of The Economist. It is anything but breezy.

http://www.economist.com/PrinterFriendl ... d=15545834

Sandro
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Re: Reading Comp passages of the past and now

Postby Sandro » Sat Mar 06, 2010 12:23 am

I used to have a subscription to the economist - while im sure reading it might help a little, it is hardly the type of language used in modern RC. The articles are usually easy enough to read that I can peruse through one on the toilet. Can't say the same about LSATs, but that might just be because A. I dont read LSAT on the toilet and B. Nobody asks me 7 ambiguous questions about what I just read on the toilet.




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