EXCEPT questions

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FuManChusco
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Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:56 pm

EXCEPT questions

Postby FuManChusco » Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:19 pm

I always mess these up. I underline the except and try to force myself to remember its the opposite, yet I always end up picking a completely wrong answer. PT 32, section 1, Q17, I somehow missed D. How in the hell could I possibly get that wrong? Does any remember the chapter of the LRB that goes through what the EXCEPT means? Like, "must be true EXCEPT" means could be false, correct? I know this is simple, but I honestly get -1 on an EXCEPT almost every LR section. If I could stop making these stupid mistakes, I think 172+ is likely so I need to fix this problem.

Shrimps
Posts: 271
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:04 pm

Re: EXCEPT questions

Postby Shrimps » Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:44 pm

Force yourself to go through all the answer choices whenever you see except. Than you will realize that more than one of them is possibly right, and that'll bring you back on track? It's a minor mental block. Should be easy to overcome.

OHKC42
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Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 3:19 pm

Re: EXCEPT questions

Postby OHKC42 » Tue Mar 02, 2010 9:18 pm

Try looking at Powerscore's books...I think the Logical Reasoning Bible addresses this, but maybe Logic Games does, too. Anyway, one of those two has a good section on such questions.

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JazzOne
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Re: EXCEPT questions

Postby JazzOne » Tue Mar 02, 2010 11:43 pm

OK, here's my trick. I always turn "except" questions into "yes/no" questions. Then, instead of eliminating answers, I write a Y or an N next to the answer choice. Once I'm finished, I look for the one answer choice that's different from the others.

For example:

"Each of the following weakens the argument except..."

Translate to: "Does this answer choice weaken the argument?"

Applying the Y/N question to the answers, you will have four answer choices marked "Y" and one marked "N."

I thought this trick was a bit elementary when it was taught to me. However, the semantics of the test are difficult enough, and sometimes the negation (except) is the final straw that causes the mental house of cards to collapse. Using my trick will completely eliminate the negation and allow you to focus on the argument and the question type.
Last edited by JazzOne on Wed Mar 03, 2010 12:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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willwash
Posts: 318
Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2010 9:51 pm

Re: EXCEPT questions

Postby willwash » Wed Mar 03, 2010 12:01 am

JazzOne wrote:OK, here's my trick. I always turn "except" questions into "yes/no" questions. Then, instead of eliminating answers, I write a Y or an N next to the answer choice. Once I'm finished, I look for the one answer choice that's different from the others.

For example:

"Each of the following weakens the argument except?"

Translate to: "Does this answer choice weaken the argument?"

Applying the Y/N question to the answers, you will have four answer choices marked "Y" and one marked "N."

I thought this trick was a bit elementary when it was taught to me. However, the semantics of the test are difficult enough, and sometimes the negation (except) is the final straw that causes the mental house of cards to collapse. Using my trick will completely eliminate the negation and allow you to focus on the argument and the question type.


Brilliant

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FuManChusco
Posts: 1217
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:56 pm

Re: EXCEPT questions

Postby FuManChusco » Wed Mar 03, 2010 12:24 am

Thank you JazzOne. That is such a simple solution. I always try to do this in my head and eliminate questions, but I end up forgetting the actual stem half way through, eliminate the answer I should be looking for, and then I end up with 5 crossed out. By that point I'm rushing and I tend to make a mistake. I'll probably do a section later tonight and try this out. Seems like a really good idea.

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basicgrey7
Posts: 127
Joined: Thu May 28, 2009 10:29 pm

Re: EXCEPT questions

Postby basicgrey7 » Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:48 pm

willwash wrote:
JazzOne wrote:OK, here's my trick. I always turn "except" questions into "yes/no" questions. Then, instead of eliminating answers, I write a Y or an N next to the answer choice. Once I'm finished, I look for the one answer choice that's different from the others.

For example:

"Each of the following weakens the argument except?"

Translate to: "Does this answer choice weaken the argument?"

Applying the Y/N question to the answers, you will have four answer choices marked "Y" and one marked "N."

I thought this trick was a bit elementary when it was taught to me. However, the semantics of the test are difficult enough, and sometimes the negation (except) is the final straw that causes the mental house of cards to collapse. Using my trick will completely eliminate the negation and allow you to focus on the argument and the question type.


Brilliant
This is good! I always read way too fast and I skip words so I always skip the EXCEPT.




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