PT 37, Section 3, Question 3

CMDantes
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PT 37, Section 3, Question 3

Postby CMDantes » Sat Feb 27, 2010 12:54 pm

So the kids UNANIMOUSLY voted based off of what the teacher said. I understand this, and I was tempted to select the right answer but the inclusion of the word "some" threw me off.

Why is (d) correct if it says only some of the students were affected? Wouldn't it have been more correct to say 'most' or 'all'?

Am I to assume that some chose the pieces regardless of what the teacher said and some others based their decision off of what they'd been told? Doesn't that go against the point of the stimulus, saying that they unanimously voted based on what they'd been told?

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Atlas LSAT Teacher
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Re: PT 37, Section 3, Question 3

Postby Atlas LSAT Teacher » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:39 pm

I think you're right to be suspicious of (D), but I actually hesitated because it was too strong in my opinion. But, when I moved on to (E) and saw that it was just as bad as (A)-(C), (D) became the clear winner.

It's actually possible that the two classes were not affected by what the teacher said, and it's simply that the first class is impatient, and always chooses the first thing, and the second one has a short attention span and so forgot about the first one. Obviously, this is an exaggeration, but without knowing that all other conditions were the same, including the nature of the students, we can't say for sure. Perhaps the most obvious explanation (though it's come to me last!) is that the painting that was shown in the museum was simply much better. So, (D) is the MOST STRONGLY supported, but it is not something we can infer 100%. It's more of a 95% sort of thing.

Common sense would lead us to believe that the kids were swayed by the history of the paintings, but we would be on thin ice to say ALL the students were affected by that. Just one kid feeling otherwise would throw this off. When you have to choose between two answer choices for an inference question, choose the safer, more provable one. This is great practice, I imagine, for fact pattern work in law school.

Tell me if that clears it up.

CMDantes
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Re: PT 37, Section 3, Question 3

Postby CMDantes » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:55 pm

Got it, I had a problem with the fact that is wasn't a 100% certainty. I'm starting to see where my thinking needs to be on these kind of questions. Less being sure and more about ruling out the other answer choices which are definitely incorrect.

Thanks for the quick response!

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Atlas LSAT Teacher
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Re: PT 37, Section 3, Question 3

Postby Atlas LSAT Teacher » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:04 pm

CMDantes wrote: Less being sure and more about ruling out the other answer choices which are definitely incorrect.

Yeah, I think this is a shift that can pay off large dividends in LR and RC. Glad to help.

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TheLuckyOne
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Re: PT 37, Section 3, Question 3

Postby TheLuckyOne » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:51 pm

OP, in inference questions responses are never wrong if they leave extra space comparing to when they run to extremes. For instance, C is way too definitive with its "each" and "any", just like A with its "most" and "any".

Now, D is a perfect answer. Since we definitely know that there was a correlation between who painted it (history) and popularity among students. Though, maybe, even if some of them have clearly liked the prestigious one more just because it's better, it's still very likely that the very fact that it is prestigious has had some infulence on their choice.

If D said "most", it would be a hasty conslusion. "Some" and "at least" are perfect non-risky answer choices in assumption and inference questions.




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