Does anyone else have the same problem?

schand
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Feb 02, 2010 4:38 pm

Does anyone else have the same problem?

Postby schand » Sat Feb 20, 2010 11:18 pm

For logical reasoning, I feel like I can't concentrate on the arguments very well when doing a timed section. This really hurts my speed and accuracy obviously. I think a part of it is that I get nervous that I won't be able to complete the section in time and start losing my concentration. Also, I think a part of it is that it's hard for me to jump from one question to the next because I have to be 99% sure I got that question right before I go on to the next question, especially if the question is in the first 15. Additionally, I find it kind of hard to jump from one topic to the next. In contrast, I'm very good at reading comprehension and can get through it with some time leftover with pretty high accuracy. Anyway, I'm not really sure what to do about this. I've spent a lot of time working on accuracy and trying to understand questions untimed. Does anyone recommend that LSAT timer I've heard about? Should I try timing each question to under 1 min 20 seconds? I feel like I've studied so much for this exam and am just not doing something right. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

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Waggly Toast
Posts: 35
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:08 pm

Re: Does anyone else have the same problem?

Postby Waggly Toast » Sat Feb 20, 2010 11:51 pm

Remember, each question is only worth 1 point. The extra hard ones and the easy ones all equal one point. Wasting time on a question worth one point sacrifices points that could be obtained by answering the easy ones. Even within the first 15 there are hard ones.

Time yourself and make sure you're answering the questions in under 1:15. Who cares about the topics. The test is formulated to test your ability to recognize different types of questions, formulate a plan for answering those, and then doing so correctly. It does not award any points for knowledge about subject matter. I had to overcome this obstacle. Many questions angered me as they were blatantly opposite my views.

The best thing you can do is take a day off and forget about the LSAT. Go somewhere or do something fun where you know you will not think about the test. I know it sounds impossible, but I'm sure you'll think of something fun to do.

ConsideringLawSchool
Posts: 313
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 12:18 pm

Re: Does anyone else have the same problem?

Postby ConsideringLawSchool » Sun Feb 21, 2010 1:13 am

schand wrote:For logical reasoning, I feel like I can't concentrate on the arguments very well when doing a timed section. This really hurts my speed and accuracy obviously. I think a part of it is that I get nervous that I won't be able to complete the section in time and start losing my concentration. Also, I think a part of it is that it's hard for me to jump from one question to the next because I have to be 99% sure I got that question right before I go on to the next question, especially if the question is in the first 15. Additionally, I find it kind of hard to jump from one topic to the next. In contrast, I'm very good at reading comprehension and can get through it with some time leftover with pretty high accuracy. Anyway, I'm not really sure what to do about this. I've spent a lot of time working on accuracy and trying to understand questions untimed. Does anyone recommend that LSAT timer I've heard about? Should I try timing each question to under 1 min 20 seconds? I feel like I've studied so much for this exam and am just not doing something right. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!


To address one component of what you said, I think that moving on when you feel slightly unsure can definitely be hard. What I did was make a small mark next to any question of which I was not 100% sure. I sometimes made marks next to questions 1-5 just because I didn't feel entirely confident. Even if I never made it back to these questions, just the idea that I might come back helped me to move on.

Once I got to a point where I consistently had time to review all my marked questions, I found that I virtually never changed my answers on those marked questions that were in the first 15. If you try this system, keep track of the questions that you mark and whether or not you are frequently changing your answers on those "uncertain" questions. If you find that you are not changing those answers much and are getting them right, you will come to learn for yourself when lack of confidence indicates a possibly incorrect answer and when it doesn't. Hope that helps you.

borntokill
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:26 am

Re: Does anyone else have the same problem?

Postby borntokill » Sun Feb 21, 2010 3:14 am

you just need to pratice more under timed conditions, so you can get used to the pressure
and don't become too attached / committed to any single question

schand
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Feb 02, 2010 4:38 pm

Re: Does anyone else have the same problem?

Postby schand » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:28 pm

Thanks, this is pretty solid advice. I know it is different for everyone, but when do you decide to just choose an answer choice and move on if you're having difficult? For example, if you read the entire problem and answer choices and are not confident about the answer do you move on or do you reread it and try to tackle it again?

r6_philly
Posts: 10707
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 4:32 pm

Re: Does anyone else have the same problem?

Postby r6_philly » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:41 pm

I would skip all the parellel reasoning question types, mark them and come back to them if you have time. They are time killers.

If you read through all answer choices and you can't decide on which one is right (or worse, all of them seem wrong) then in my case, I misread the prompt. I eliminate the answers when I read them, so once in a while I eliminate all 5. In that case I have to reread slower and more carefully. But it depend on you, maybe you want to skip it until later. I don't like to skip a question because I would lose all I have gained already in my head, but in the case where you may have misread something, it is better if you do lose it all. So in that case I would come back to it later. In cases where you have more than 1 possible answers, usually it is tricky one where the wrong answer makes sense generally, but does not fit the prompt perfectly. So study the wording in the premise, usually it differs from the wording in the wrong answer *slightly*.




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