Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

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Knock
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Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby Knock » Fri Feb 19, 2010 12:38 am

Which is better? PR and PS only has private tutoring in my area, while Kaplan seems to have classroom and tutoring for my area.

I've already been learning LG according to the Powerscore Bible, so i'm hesitant to learn a new LG system (I'm not sure if PR has a different system but I think Kaplan does?)

Anyways, any advice appreciated.

For tutoring, it seems that princeton review is 100$ an hour, Powerscore $150 and kaplan I couldnt find a price. also what is the different for princeton review master and premier tutoring vs standard. it seems like a lot of extra money, is it worth it?

tomwatts
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby tomwatts » Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:59 am

Knockglock wrote:Which is better? PR and PS only has private tutoring in my area, while Kaplan seems to have classroom and tutoring for my area.

Out of curiosity, where are you? I can't come up with a place where we (Princeton Review) wouldn't have an office but Kaplan would, but then, I'm not an expert on the geography of test prep.

Knockglock wrote:I've already been learning LG according to the Powerscore Bible, so i'm hesitant to learn a new LG system (I'm not sure if PR has a different system but I think Kaplan does?)

It is true that Princeton Review, Kaplan, and Powerscore all descend from different sources, so the systems are not identical. However, the LSAT is still the LSAT. It's not shockingly different from company to company.

Knockglock wrote:also what is the different for princeton review master and premier tutoring vs standard. it seems like a lot of extra money, is it worth it?

The primary difference is the experience level of the tutor. Every Princeton Review instructor starts out as a teacher, and if they do well in that, they get promoted to Standard Tutor. Then, after a couple of years, if they've worked with a lot of students and gotten good score improvements and seem ready to be a higher level, they get promoted to Master Tutor (that's what I am). Then, if enough time goes by that the tutor is basically the most experienced person the office has, then that person gets promoted to Premier. (Our Premier LSAT Tutor in Northern California has 15+ years of experience tutoring test prep.)

Master is not much more than Standard (about 50% more). I'd say that the extra is worth it if you can afford it.

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Knock
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby Knock » Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:11 am

tomwatts wrote:
Knockglock wrote:Which is better? PR and PS only has private tutoring in my area, while Kaplan seems to have classroom and tutoring for my area.

Out of curiosity, where are you? I can't come up with a place where we (Princeton Review) wouldn't have an office but Kaplan would, but then, I'm not an expert on the geography of test prep.

Knockglock wrote:I've already been learning LG according to the Powerscore Bible, so i'm hesitant to learn a new LG system (I'm not sure if PR has a different system but I think Kaplan does?)

It is true that Princeton Review, Kaplan, and Powerscore all descend from different sources, so the systems are not identical. However, the LSAT is still the LSAT. It's not shockingly different from company to company.

Knockglock wrote:also what is the different for princeton review master and premier tutoring vs standard. it seems like a lot of extra money, is it worth it?

The primary difference is the experience level of the tutor. Every Princeton Review instructor starts out as a teacher, and if they do well in that, they get promoted to Standard Tutor. Then, after a couple of years, if they've worked with a lot of students and gotten good score improvements and seem ready to be a higher level, they get promoted to Master Tutor (that's what I am). Then, if enough time goes by that the tutor is basically the most experienced person the office has, then that person gets promoted to Premier. (Our Premier LSAT Tutor in Northern California has 15+ years of experience tutoring test prep.)

Master is not much more than Standard (about 50% more). I'd say that the extra is worth it if you can afford it.


Thank you very much Tom! I'm located in central California.

Hmm thats very interesting. So basically master/premier is more experienced and has a strong history of score improvements then? I'm very intrigued, I am going to have to look further into the Princeton Review tutor, but I have to say that you taking the time to answer my questions was very appreciated! Definitely a big + in the Princeton Review column.

tomwatts
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby tomwatts » Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:48 am

Knockglock wrote:Thank you very much Tom! I'm located in central California.

Oh, that'd do it. We have NorCal and SoCal pretty well covered, but LSAT is pretty sparse in the middle. We do MCAT out of, say, Fresno, but not a ton of LSAT.
Knockglock wrote:Hmm thats very interesting. So basically master/premier is more experienced and has a strong history of score improvements then?

That's the idea.
Knockglock wrote:I'm very intrigued, I am going to have to look further into the Princeton Review tutor, but I have to say that you taking the time to answer my questions was very appreciated! Definitely a big + in the Princeton Review column.

Glad to help. Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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rupert.pupkin
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby rupert.pupkin » Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:55 am

I found these courses--rather--um- elementary.

nyknicks
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby nyknicks » Sat Feb 20, 2010 1:59 am

rupert.pupkin wrote:I found these courses--rather elementary.

I'm sure they were. I remember these courses, they were right between recess and lunch.
Last edited by nyknicks on Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

nyknicks
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby nyknicks » Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:05 am

Rupert, I was hoping you could give me some insight on the evolution of logic games. My contention is that prior to PT 32, the logic games, especially sequencing, could most aptly be characterized as traditional linear.

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rupert.pupkin
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby rupert.pupkin » Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:16 am

nyknicks wrote:Rupert, I was hoping you could give me some insight on the evolution of logic games. My contention is that prior to PT 32, the logic games, especially sequencing, could most aptly be characterized as traditional linear.


Of course that's your contention. You're a first year grad student. You just got finished some psychometrician, Wendy Margolis prob’ly, you’re gonna be convinced of that until next month when you get to David Killorian, then you’re gonna be talkin’ about how logic games included grouping and mapping compents back when top scores were in the 40s. That's gonna last until next year, you’re gonna be in here regurgitating Irina Limar, talkin’ about you know, the Pre-TTTestmasters utopia and the capital-saving effects of LGB mobilization.

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Na_Swatch
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby Na_Swatch » Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:20 am

rupert.pupkin wrote:I found these courses--rather--um- elementary.



--ImageRemoved--

nyknicks
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Re: Kaplan Course vs. Princeton Review vs. Powerscore

Postby nyknicks » Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:21 am

rupert.pupkin wrote:
nyknicks wrote:Rupert, I was hoping you could give me some insight on the evolution of logic games. My contention is that prior to PT 32, the logic games, especially sequencing, could most aptly be characterized as traditional linear.


Of course that's your contention. You're a first year grad student. You just got finished some psychometrician, Wendy Margolis prob’ly, you’re gonna be convinced of that until next month when you get to David Killorian, then you’re gonna be talkin’ about how logic games included grouping and mapping compents back when top scores were in the 40s. That's gonna last until next year, you’re gonna be in here regurgitating Irina Limar, talkin’ about you know, the Pre-TTTestmasters utopia and the capital-saving effects of LGB mobilization.


Actually I won't, because Limar drastrically underestimates the impact of lsat percentile destinctions predicated upon prep, especially review course prep.




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