Is it Possible?

girlfrombrooklyn
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:07 am

Is it Possible?

Postby girlfrombrooklyn » Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:23 am

I was averaging 157-160 on test preps in 2008.
After probably the worst panic attack known to man on the Dec exam, I bombed. I see many people say they got 160+ scores I am curious to know what their starting scores were....
Anyways I really tanked to a score that I couldn't even apply with, 139 (my mom still believes some school out there will take me because of my grades I know differently). Anyways I have since taken a year off and plan to take the exam in October. Is it possible for me to get in the 165+ range. My current plan of action is to study 2-3 hours per day six days a week, with 1 prep test per week up until 2 months prior and then 3 test per week during the final month. I don't have a job, kids, but I am in grad school full-time my courses well let's just say I have a lot of free time on my hands.
Is it possible for me to reach my goal score?

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Mroberts3
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 10:10 pm

Re: Is it Possible?

Postby Mroberts3 » Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:49 am

Of course it's possible, but I don't think that's why you're really asking. You're scared because you bombed the test the first time and you are looking for reassurance here (and in your study plan). The best advice I can give is not to worry about how much you are going to study, but rather how you are going to study. You can't assume that simply putting in the hours will get you a good score. You need to attack the problems critically and REALLY LEARN the test to the point where you can consistently score in your desired range. Welcome the challenge, don't cower in fear.

Preparing for and taking the LSAT was the single most grueling academic obstacle I have faced. The night before was pretty much all stress (and I'm sure everyone here would agree). However, you need to really take a look at yourself and think about how you are going to overcome this obstacle. A bunch of people of teh interwebz saying "you can do it! Go get 'em!" isn't going to make it happen.

I'm not trying to scare you away from trying again, or telling you that you don't have what it takes, but this post belies a lack of self confidence. (and you are compensating for that in ways I have seen before in friends of mine -- i.e. planning a certain amount of studying instead of really engaging with the material)

Good luck and happy LSAT hunting.

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thelawguy777
Posts: 65
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 3:46 am

Re: Is it Possible?

Postby thelawguy777 » Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:50 am

With that kind of study it is absolutely possible!

One piece of advice... Don't burn yourself out doing 2-3hrs a day. If you can use it productively, great, do it. But it's better to cut it down in time as a trade off for consistency and quality of study.

girlfrombrooklyn
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:07 am

Re: Is it Possible?

Postby girlfrombrooklyn » Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:57 am

Thank you that was probably the most honest response ever and I truly appreciate that. The exam is honestly daunting for me, being an honor student my whole life but the one thing I've always had problems with is standardized test. They freak me out. The only positive outcome of that exam is that it is the first standard exam where I didn't fall asleep. I would have to say my confidence has increased as a result of forcing myself to study. I am learning more now from self-study than I am from the stupid Kaplan course. It's only been a week but having taken the year off to be able to start from scratch I think has helped a lot. I feel at this point I did eff up the exam the first go around but could it really get worst? I mean yes it could but I feel like I am making an attempt to put my best foot forward by actually understanding what I am looking at trying to comprehend what was in the mind of the demented old man who created the exam.

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Mroberts3
Posts: 300
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 10:10 pm

Re: Is it Possible?

Postby Mroberts3 » Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:06 am

The best way for me to deal with the test was full practice exams in a classroom setting either in my PowerScore class or with my roommate who was taking it too. Being in a situation where you can't just stop the test if you mess up a game forces you to treat it like the real thing. It's obvious to say you should take as many practice tests as you can without burning out, but make them count. Take them in real testing situations and then spend as much time as it takes to understand why you missed every question you did. The Kaplan class might seem lame, but at a minimum you should use it to ground your studying. You shouldn't be taking the class and studying on your own separately -- they should be part of the same study plan.

It's late and I'm blathering on again. Anyway, my point is to focus on two things: 1)preparing for the stamina/test day stress aspect, and 2)preparing for the actual questions. If you were scoring near a 160, then I think #1 should be your main focus -- you just need to channel your energy more productively.

Being scared helps you run faster when that bear starts to chase you, but it's only going to mess you up on the LSAT.

tdogg
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 4:44 am

Re: Is it Possible?

Postby tdogg » Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:17 am

That is totally possible. My decision to go to law school was an about-face. I am 29 and have a career. I earn a great living, but just felt inspired to go to law school all the sudden. I got a crappy 147 on my first practice test, which probably isn't all that bad considering I had never even looked at a single LSAT question before. I took that "crappy kaplan class" and loved it. I studied for 2-4 hours most every night (I work full time and have 2 kids) doing the mastery practice. I hundreds and hundreds of questions. After I learned the question types really well, I started doing the pacing practices to the actual 35 minute time limit. After each practice, I would go through and really learn the questions I missed, and why. Kaplan has answers and explanations to every single question...use them! Then I started taking practice tests every 2 or 3 days for the last two weeks. It was only about 6 weeks from the time I decided to go to law school until my official test day. Prior to the actual test I was consistently getting 164-166. Test day came. I wanted anything but LG as my first section just so I could settle my nerves and get in the swing of things. Sure enough..damn games were first. I was rattled but battled my way through it and settled down as the test went on. I missed 11 questions on LG and 7 questions on the second section. After that, I only missed 6 questions total on the remaining 3 sections. I got a 161. I was a bit disappointed since it was below what I was getting, but it was good enough to apply now and see what happens. The key is just getting comfortable with the test. Go to testing centers, or your actual testing place if possible. Take a practice test there under as real as conditions as possible. Time yourself strictly. If you can get comfy enough with that test...just pretend the real thing is just another practice. Yes, you will still be a bit stressed and nervous, but you will have done it many times before. Good luck!




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