How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
User avatar
EbonyEsq
Posts: 264
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:06 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby EbonyEsq » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:03 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
EbonyEsq wrote:
schween wrote:I really believe it's not the schools that are the problem: it's the kids.


:roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

You clearly have yet to understand what it means to attend public school in the ghetto.


I don't know whether that explanation holds any weight in a generalization, but I know at my undergrad I've come across individuals whose parents emphasize education, who they themselves emphasize education, who are struggling significantly to keep up because they were poorly prepared in K-12 for the rigor of my undergrad.


I'm sorry but did these same individuals suggest that the reason they struggled "significantly to keep up" in said undergrad was because they were "poorly prepared in K-12 for the rigor" or are you coming to such deductions on your own? :|

I'd be interested to know how such conversation came about.

User avatar
EbonyEsq
Posts: 264
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:06 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby EbonyEsq » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:09 pm

schween wrote:
acrossthelake wrote:
EbonyEsq wrote:
schween wrote:I really believe it's not the schools that are the problem: it's the kids.


:roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

You clearly have yet to understand what it means to attend public school in the ghetto.


I don't know whether that explanation holds any weight in a generalization, but I know at my undergrad I've come across individuals whose parents emphasize education, who they themselves emphasize education, who are struggling significantly to keep up because they were poorly prepared in K-12 for the rigor of my undergrad.


The difference I'm getting at isn't what separates As and Cs at a given college. It's the difference between dropping out and going to college.

When I say "It's the kids," I mean it's the difference in upbringing that they have had, and the difference in experiences that they bring with them into school, compared to kids who have a much easier time finding success in school. The kids themselves aren't to blame, but just improving schools won't lessen inequalities unless much deeper structural issues are addressed.


Now you flip the script?

You first suggest that schools weren't to blame to begin with that the onus was "on the kids".

Now you're saying 'well the kids themselves aren't to blame'. What is it exactly?

I never once suggested that improving schools was the solution. I do, however, believe improvement of the public school system will significantly help ALONGSIDE proper parenting AND a loving home that encourages a healthy learning environment. Put those recipes together and ANY child regardless or creed or race can and will succeed.

schween
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:00 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby schween » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:21 pm

Now you flip the script?

You first suggest that schools weren't to blame to begin with that the onus was "on the kids".

Now you're saying 'well the kids themselves aren't to blame'. What is it exactly?

I never once suggested that improving schools was the solution. I do, however, believe improvement of the public school system will significantly help ALONGSIDE proper parenting AND a loving home that encourages a healthy learning environment. Put those recipes together and ANY child regardless or creed or race can and will succeed.


Didn't flip the script. This is what I originally said:
I really believe it's not the schools that are the problem: it's the kids. Who the kids are, is primarily a function of who the parents are.


The implication is that the parents have a hugely determinative effect on the outcomes of their kids.

By mentioning the poor quality of the schools, I assume you were assigning some blame for the outcomes of students graduating (or failing to graduate from) those schools. Even if you weren't saying it directly, I've heard it said time and time again that "if we can improve our schools, the students in those sub-par schools will be so much better off, and have greater educational and career success."

User avatar
EbonyEsq
Posts: 264
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:06 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby EbonyEsq » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:29 pm

schween wrote:
Now you flip the script?

You first suggest that schools weren't to blame to begin with that the onus was "on the kids".

Now you're saying 'well the kids themselves aren't to blame'. What is it exactly?

I never once suggested that improving schools was the solution. I do, however, believe improvement of the public school system will significantly help ALONGSIDE proper parenting AND a loving home that encourages a healthy learning environment. Put those recipes together and ANY child regardless or creed or race can and will succeed.


Didn't flip the script. This is what I originally said:
I really believe it's not the schools that are the problem: it's the kids. Who the kids are, is primarily a function of who the parents are.


The implication is that the parents have a hugely determinative effect on the outcomes of their kids.

By mentioning the poor quality of the schools, I assume you were assigning some blame for the outcomes of students graduating (or failing to graduate from) those schools. Even if you weren't saying it directly, I've heard it said time and time again that "if we can improve our schools, the students in those sub-par schools will be so much better off, and have greater educational and career success."


Right, so the educational system that is a child's first introduction to learning has absolutely NO role in determining how well he or she succeeds or fails in college, grad school or beyond.

Just blame it on the parenting.

:|


And FYI, yes I am assuming SOME blame on those very schools but I am not assuming that these schools are THE sole cause of the educational deficiencies seen in so many URM students.

schween
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:00 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby schween » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:36 pm

the educational system that is a child's first introduction to learning


If the educational system really is their first introduction to learning, then that is the problem, and it's not the school's problem.

User avatar
SwollenMonkey
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:28 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby SwollenMonkey » Fri Aug 13, 2010 8:09 pm

@EbonyEsq,


You know, island girls are really hot!

User avatar
tooswolle
Posts: 491
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 4:48 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby tooswolle » Sun Aug 15, 2010 12:20 am

It would be foolish to think there is only one reason behind the disparity. However, one cNt ignore the differences in schools in this country. Suburban areas have nicer schools, while inner cities have for lack of a better word "shittier" schools. If there is a disparity in education those disadvantaged will have to play catch up to level the playing field. Furthermore as mentioned earlier urms as a group perform more poorly on standardized tests then other groups. With all the apparent disadvantages and adverse affects created by institution it seems to me that those in power need to correct the problem. The best way in my opinion is to allow for more opportunities to be able to "our people" so that we can help change the status quo.

rundoxierun
Posts: 1893
Joined: Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:46 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby rundoxierun » Sun Aug 15, 2010 10:01 pm

Wow.. I just looked at the raw numbers and its insane.. 3 for the 1st year class at Cornell and 8 for the first year class at Columbia?? Come on, Ithica isnt that bad... Looks like Harvard sucks up a majority of qualified black male applicants.

User avatar
mpasi
Posts: 324
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby mpasi » Sun Aug 15, 2010 10:46 pm

I really don't have anything to add, other than the fact that I'm an alum of a magnet school that was specifically set up for minority students, and it's considered one of the top high schools in the country. Three of the clusters are in the top five on Newsweek's list of top schools, with one of them taking the top spot. What's funny about the school is its location: behind a county jail, across the street from a motel known for drug deals and hookers, and up the street from a shitty crime-infested neighborhood. A lot of the Highland Park set try to get their kids admitted.

whymeohgodno
Posts: 2508
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 8:15 pm

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby whymeohgodno » Sat Aug 21, 2010 9:44 am

Not really that hard to get in as a URM to t20 schools.

User avatar
vanwinkle
Posts: 9740
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:02 am

Re: How rare are black American males in T20 law schools?

Postby vanwinkle » Sat Aug 21, 2010 9:46 am

whymeohgodno wrote:Not really that hard to get in as a URM to t20 schools.

I don't think it was necessary to revive this thread just to say that.




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests