Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

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Law 202x

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Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

Postby Law 202x » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:42 pm

chargers21 wrote:You're going to struggle with reading comprehension, friend. I was mostly correcting your clearly erroneous paraphrasing. I admit that he gave the obvious answer, but you misstated that he said that you "had to have" a degree a from those schools. We've given you some deeper answers as far as other schools that will help you towards a very unlikely outcome. I'd recommend a religious/conservative law school because the constitutional law courses and networks at them will be geared towards what you want to do.


But now you're offering me LSAT advice. I haven't even had a chance to make an LSAT thread yet but maybe I will later. "Given me deeper advice," Regent, Ave Maria, are you kidding me? There are some very well-known law blogs that suggest not even thinking about law school without a full ride to a top 20 school. What makes you think I would consider applying to one of those schools? Especially when I can get into something better. I know my GPA is low, but I plan to make up for it with a high LSAT, high being relative since your high may be much better than my high.

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Timofey_Pnin

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Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

Postby Timofey_Pnin » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:49 pm

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Last edited by Timofey_Pnin on Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

sparkytrainer

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Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

Postby sparkytrainer » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:52 pm

This guy rivals Kevin from Ave Maria. I miss Kevin.

Obvious troll is obvious.

Law 202x

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Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

Postby Law 202x » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:58 pm

Timofey_Pnin wrote:
Law 202x wrote:
Regent, Ave Maria, are you kidding me? There are some very well-known law blogs that suggest not even thinking about law school without a full ride to a top 20 school. What makes you think I would consider applying to one of those schools? Especially when I can get into something better.


Dude you have a 2.98 and no LSAT. If you want people here to recommend you T14s, come back when you have a shot at those schools. Everyone hopes for a high LSAT. 97% of people don't hit 170.


Nope. And I don't have a 2.98 although that's very generous of you. I have a 2.93. Would I be correct in saying that schools such as Regent et al. have ranks in the 200s? So there are surely some schools between #200 and #14. I don't have an LSAT but it really wouldn't be correct to think my LSAT should correlate with my GPA. A lot of people have low GPAs for many other reasons than that they were poor or incompetent students. I happen to think a 160 is a very nice score on the LSAT, although not sufficient to my needs. However I have taken the GRE and received 164 V / 162 M/ 5.0 AW (94,82,93) if that means anything to you, and that was with no practice except for the essay which I read the grading rubric, read a couple practice essays and wrote one practice essay that was computer graded so if I had to do better, I think I could probably get a couple more points.

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Pneumonia

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Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

Postby Pneumonia » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:00 pm

Law 202x wrote: That's very good advice. But I'm certainly on no track to either Harvard or Yale. Admittedly the divinity schools of those colleges are easier to get into than the law schools, and it would be a very satisfying joint program, but it still doesn't change the fact that my chance of admission to JD there is zero. U Chicago also has a great divinity school and I doubt that one would be prejudiced too much to only have a UC law degree. However, the advice is vague enough that it could be applied to essentially anything. "You want to be ____, you should go to Harvard or Yale." We should all go to Harvard or Yale. Hopefully that is only sufficient but not necessary to work in this area.


"Go to H/Y" is actually a fairly uncommon piece of advice on these boards. Usually the better course is to get a big scholarship at another school. But you asked about three very niche areas, two of which are so specific that I doubt they exist. It's ok if you can't get into H/Y. Assuming you want to protect the ten commandments and whatnot, then you should do what the other posters have said and focus on getting into one of the conservative schools.
    Pepperdine
      George Mason
      Gonzaga
      Ave Maria
      Regent
      Liberty

    Before school, try to do Blackstone. During school, try to do James Wilson or Claremont (google these if you don't know what they are). Networking will be key.

    But here's some big picture advice: these are not very many of these jobs. And there are a lot of people who want them. If you're interested in fighting for the little guy, that's great. But you should think hard about what you'll do if you don't get hired by one of the orgs you're interested in. If you go all-in on getting on of these gigs, you'll necessarily be foregoing the traditional onramps to private-sector legal employment.

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    A. Nony Mouse

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:08 pm

    Law 202x wrote:
    chargers21 wrote:You're going to struggle with reading comprehension, friend. I was mostly correcting your clearly erroneous paraphrasing. I admit that he gave the obvious answer, but you misstated that he said that you "had to have" a degree a from those schools. We've given you some deeper answers as far as other schools that will help you towards a very unlikely outcome. I'd recommend a religious/conservative law school because the constitutional law courses and networks at them will be geared towards what you want to do.


    But now you're offering me LSAT advice. I haven't even had a chance to make an LSAT thread yet but maybe I will later. "Given me deeper advice," Regent, Ave Maria, are you kidding me? There are some very well-known law blogs that suggest not even thinking about law school without a full ride to a top 20 school. What makes you think I would consider applying to one of those schools? Especially when I can get into something better. I know my GPA is low, but I plan to make up for it with a high LSAT, high being relative since your high may be much better than my high.

    I also suggested those schools. Some of the people at the organization you cited had degrees from those institutions. If what you want to do it pursue this defense-of-religion path and nothing else, those schools will likely put you in contact with people who feel the same way. There are of course plenty of reasons not to go to those schools, but the advice about not going without a full ride to at least a T20 man not really apply to the really narrow path that you're envisioning.

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    A. Nony Mouse

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:12 pm

    (Also: you don't really mean religious advocacy as much as Christian advocacy, right?)

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    chargers21

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby chargers21 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:17 pm

    A. Nony Mouse wrote:(Also: you don't really mean religious advocacy as much as Christian advocacy, right?)

    :lol:

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby cavalier1138 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:18 pm

    Pneumonia wrote: If you're interested in fighting for the little guy, that's great.


    When did the OP indicate any interest in fighting for the little guy?

    I'm not sure why they're so dead-set against schools like Ave Maria. At other schools, they'll probably have to go to class with humanists. And read about the Establishment Clause!

    ETA: Scooped.

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    Pneumonia

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby Pneumonia » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:25 pm

    cavalier1138 wrote:
    Pneumonia wrote: If you're interested in fighting for the little guy, that's great.


    When did the OP indicate any interest in fighting for the little guy?

    I'm not sure why they're so dead-set against schools like Ave Maria. At other schools, they'll probably have to go to class with humanists. And read about the Establishment Clause!

    ETA: Scooped.


    It was this quote--

    Law 202x wrote: Have you ever heard of a town that gets sued and they fold because they have no money and no way to represent themselves?


    Obviously not everyone agrees with OPs views, but it's pretty clear he thinks there are some christian indigents who need defending.

    Law 202x

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby Law 202x » Sat Jan 13, 2018 10:04 pm

    A. Nony Mouse wrote:(Also: you don't really mean religious advocacy as much as Christian advocacy, right?)


    Well, predominantly yes, but not necessarily. I mean I'd be as content defending traditional first amendment issues involving the rights of atheists or some politically unpopular group like nudists or something. I'm just a strong believer in the constitution and at the present tims, it seems that religious groups are one of the prime targets for disenfranchisement of these rights.

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby Law 202x » Sat Jan 13, 2018 10:07 pm

    I happen to think the ACLU does a great deal of essential work, even if much of it is also odious to me. I think their defense of Nazis is a key example of taking on an unpopular cause but because of the belief in the right to counsel.

    Law 202x

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    Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

    Postby Law 202x » Sat Jan 13, 2018 10:10 pm

    Pneumonia wrote:
    Law 202x wrote: That's very good advice. But I'm certainly on no track to either Harvard or Yale. Admittedly the divinity schools of those colleges are easier to get into than the law schools, and it would be a very satisfying joint program, but it still doesn't change the fact that my chance of admission to JD there is zero. U Chicago also has a great divinity school and I doubt that one would be prejudiced too much to only have a UC law degree. However, the advice is vague enough that it could be applied to essentially anything. "You want to be ____, you should go to Harvard or Yale." We should all go to Harvard or Yale. Hopefully that is only sufficient but not necessary to work in this area.


    "Go to H/Y" is actually a fairly uncommon piece of advice on these boards. Usually the better course is to get a big scholarship at another school. But you asked about three very niche areas, two of which are so specific that I doubt they exist. It's ok if you can't get into H/Y. Assuming you want to protect the ten commandments and whatnot, then you should do what the other posters have said and focus on getting into one of the conservative schools.
      Pepperdine
        George Mason
        Gonzaga
        Ave Maria
        Regent
        Liberty

      Before school, try to do Blackstone. During school, try to do James Wilson or Claremont (google these if you don't know what they are). Networking will be key.

      But here's some big picture advice: these are not very many of these jobs. And there are a lot of people who want them. If you're interested in fighting for the little guy, that's great. But you should think hard about what you'll do if you don't get hired by one of the orgs you're interested in. If you go all-in on getting on of these gigs, you'll necessarily be foregoing the traditional onramps to private-sector legal employment.


      Best post so far by a mile. But what is Blackstone and James Wilson?

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      A. Nony Mouse

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      Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

      Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:12 pm

      Law 202x wrote:
      A. Nony Mouse wrote:(Also: you don't really mean religious advocacy as much as Christian advocacy, right?)


      Well, predominantly yes, but not necessarily. I mean I'd be as content defending traditional first amendment issues involving the rights of atheists or some politically unpopular group like nudists or something. I'm just a strong believer in the constitution and at the present tims, it seems that religious groups are one of the prime targets for disenfranchisement of these rights.

      Okay, that's fair (I mean, I don't actually agree about the disenfranchisement part, but the concept is fair). I asked in part b/c the organization you linked seems to be expressly Christian.

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      A. Nony Mouse

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      Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

      Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:14 pm

      Also: http://www.blackstonelegalfellowship.org/

      (I know a few people who did this and had a great experience, FWIW. One works there now.)

      Law 202x

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      Re: Religious Advocacy - Seminary and Law

      Postby Law 202x » Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:27 pm

      A. Nony Mouse wrote:Okay, that's fair (I mean, I don't actually agree about the disenfranchisement part, but the concept is fair). I asked in part b/c the organization you linked seems to be expressly Christian.


      They are but they're one of the better known ones. I appreciate the work of all such organizations that are advancing constitutional issues, even the ACLU, which occasionally defends the Constitution.

      A. Nony Mouse wrote:Also: http://www.blackstonelegalfellowship.org/

      (I know a few people who did this and had a great experience, FWIW. One works there now.)


      Thanks for that information. I had not heard of it before.



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