Please help.

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
ChicagoKid27
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2016 3:46 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby ChicagoKid27 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:51 pm

ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


You do realize that I plan on studying for the LSAT right? I'm learning a foreign language to keep my mind sharp and to help increase analytical skill, I'm only a junior, yea your right. I also plan on taking a year or two between graduated and starting law school. If I start studying for the LSAT now there's a good chance I could burn out. Besides, there are many benefits to being bilingual such as improved memory, increased perception, and better decision making skills. All of which will come in handy when studying for the LSAT. Plus, your understanding of the English language also improves, which is kind of important if you want to be a lawyer.


you're* oops

User avatar
blerggggg
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2015 1:42 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby blerggggg » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:57 pm

I was a CJ major in college and really enjoyed; my experience may have been different because the major was housed in the sociology department, so it was kinda like getting a soc degree with a concentration in CJ.

I'm going to second everything Nachoo2019 said. Schools won't care where you GPA comes from as long as its high. There's no index in US News where they list the number of applicants who applied as CJ majors v. STEM, they don't take that information and they don't care about it. As a result, law schools won't care either. They simply want the numerical value.

That said, you definitely have to 100 percent know you want law school, otherwise your career options are shot. Like others have said, a BA in CJ won't take you far other than law enforcement. But I don't think it's entirely worthless either. Depending on your school, a CJ degree can get you into social science research, policy work, advocacy, etc. You'll definitely need an advanced degree to advance, but that's most fields these days.

tl;dr Don't listen to anyone who thinks that if you major in x, it will increase you ability to get into law school/score more points on the LSAT. If there is even some remote point difference, your study habits and schedule should be able to close the gap. Major in what interests you, what your passionate about. That passion will help you get that 4.0 and destroy those apps.

It's 2016 and CJ isn't the major it used to be 20 years ago. Let's move on TLS.

disclaimer: 0L

User avatar
blueapple
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2012 10:56 am

Re: Please help.

Postby blueapple » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:57 pm

ChicagoKid27 wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


You do realize that I plan on studying for the LSAT right? I'm learning a foreign language to keep my mind sharp and to help increase analytical skill, I'm only a junior, yea your right. I also plan on taking a year or two between graduated and starting law school. If I start studying for the LSAT now there's a good chance I could burn out. Besides, there are many benefits to being bilingual such as improved memory, increased perception, and better decision making skills. All of which will come in handy when studying for the LSAT. Plus, your understanding of the English language also improves, which is kind of important if you want to be a lawyer.


you're* oops


I'm saying you're not really qualified to give advice about best methods for getting a high LSAT score yet. Studying for the LSAT is the best method. I'm not saying there aren't benefits to knowing another language -- I'm saying "learn a language so you can do better on the LSAT" is a bad reason to learn a language and bad advice for how to do well on the LSAT.

Also, there was no reason for you to revive a dead thread like this to impart your wisdom.

ChicagoKid27
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2016 3:46 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby ChicagoKid27 » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:00 pm

blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


You do realize that I plan on studying for the LSAT right? I'm learning a foreign language to keep my mind sharp and to help increase analytical skill, I'm only a junior, yea your right. I also plan on taking a year or two between graduated and starting law school. If I start studying for the LSAT now there's a good chance I could burn out. Besides, there are many benefits to being bilingual such as improved memory, increased perception, and better decision making skills. All of which will come in handy when studying for the LSAT. Plus, your understanding of the English language also improves, which is kind of important if you want to be a lawyer.


you're* oops


I'm saying you're not really qualified to give advice about best methods for getting a high LSAT score yet. Studying for the LSAT is the best method. I'm not saying there aren't benefits to knowing another language -- I'm saying "learn a language so you can do better on the LSAT" is a bad reason to learn a language and bad advice for how to do well on the LSAT.

Also, there was no reason for you to revive a dead thread like this to impart your wisdom.[/qu

With all due respect Redbanana, OP asked for advice. I gave advice. It's your issue you find the advice not helpful. You're not qualified to tell me I'm not qualified.

User avatar
blueapple
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2012 10:56 am

Re: Please help.

Postby blueapple » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:14 pm

ChicagoKid27 wrote: Redbanana


Very clever!

Good luck.

User avatar
UVA2B
Posts: 2630
Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 10:48 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby UVA2B » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:18 pm

ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


I'm calling really odd necro. Did you think your advice would be so transcendently important that giving this advice 6 months after the thread died off was necessary?

Also, this advice is at best anecdotally helpful because you think it's helpful for you. This advice was not solicited, and probably completely unnecessary. Think before you necro.

User avatar
UVA2B
Posts: 2630
Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 10:48 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby UVA2B » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:19 pm

blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


You do realize that I plan on studying for the LSAT right? I'm learning a foreign language to keep my mind sharp and to help increase analytical skill, I'm only a junior, yea your right. I also plan on taking a year or two between graduated and starting law school. If I start studying for the LSAT now there's a good chance I could burn out. Besides, there are many benefits to being bilingual such as improved memory, increased perception, and better decision making skills. All of which will come in handy when studying for the LSAT. Plus, your understanding of the English language also improves, which is kind of important if you want to be a lawyer.


you're* oops


I'm saying you're not really qualified to give advice about best methods for getting a high LSAT score yet. Studying for the LSAT is the best method. I'm not saying there aren't benefits to knowing another language -- I'm saying "learn a language so you can do better on the LSAT" is a bad reason to learn a language and bad advice for how to do well on the LSAT.

Also, there was no reason for you to revive a dead thread like this to impart your wisdom.


AKA this.

User avatar
guynourmin
Posts: 3426
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2016 11:42 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby guynourmin » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:19 pm

ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


You do realize that I plan on studying for the LSAT right? I'm learning a foreign language to keep my mind sharp and to help increase analytical skill, I'm only a junior, yea your right. I also plan on taking a year or two between graduated and starting law school. If I start studying for the LSAT now there's a good chance I could burn out. Besides, there are many benefits to being bilingual such as improved memory, increased perception, and better decision making skills. All of which will come in handy when studying for the LSAT. Plus, your understanding of the English language also improves, which is kind of important if you want to be a lawyer.


you're* oops


I'm saying you're not really qualified to give advice about best methods for getting a high LSAT score yet. Studying for the LSAT is the best method. I'm not saying there aren't benefits to knowing another language -- I'm saying "learn a language so you can do better on the LSAT" is a bad reason to learn a language and bad advice for how to do well on the LSAT.

Also, there was no reason for you to revive a dead thread like this to impart your wisdom.


With all due respect Redbanana, OP asked for advice. I gave advice. It's your issue you find the advice not helpful. You're not qualified to tell me I'm not qualified.[/quote]

OP actually has not posted on this forum in over 6 months. You're new here, so I'll just tell you: we do not revise old threads like this, especially if we have nothing to add to the subject (which you don't).

As for what you think you are adding to the topic, I'll quote your other thread:

if you wish to develop greater analytical reasoning skills, which is what the LSAT measures, you should try studying a foreign language


The LSAT is not simply an analytical reasoning test, so your logic is flawed here. There is an analytical reasoning section, but I do not see any reason why knowing a foreign language will help you, since it really does not test raw analytical reasoning skills, but, rather, a particularly idiosyncratic type of reasoning that is best learned by simply studying past tests. No one will tell you anything different.

User avatar
rokiv
Posts: 56
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2014 5:13 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby rokiv » Tue Dec 20, 2016 7:45 pm

ChicagoKid27 wrote:
blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


You do realize that I plan on studying for the LSAT right? I'm learning a foreign language to keep my mind sharp and to help increase analytical skill, I'm only a junior, yea your right. I also plan on taking a year or two between graduated and starting law school. If I start studying for the LSAT now there's a good chance I could burn out. Besides, there are many benefits to being bilingual such as improved memory, increased perception, and better decision making skills. All of which will come in handy when studying for the LSAT. Plus, your understanding of the English language also improves, which is kind of important if you want to be a lawyer.


You do realize that you're giving advice based on speculation about something which you' have no first-hand knowledge. Take a step back and reassess your unwarranted self-assuredness, if you want to be a lawyer.

zeglo
Posts: 664
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:42 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby zeglo » Tue Dec 20, 2016 8:48 pm

.
Last edited by zeglo on Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

TierForceOne
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2016 8:12 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby TierForceOne » Wed Dec 21, 2016 3:29 pm

blueapple wrote:
ChicagoKid27 wrote:Start studying a language. You need to the view the LSAT as a foreign language. Train yourself to recognize patterns by learning a language that is unknown to you.


Don't give advice like this if you're a junior in college and haven't taken the LSAT. It's great that you're learning Russian but the reason to learn Russian is not because it will help you on the LSAT.


Yep agreed. I took Latin and Greek and I think these were helpful for LSAT but don't take a language just for LSAT prep. Same advice for those thinking about taking logic. Logic is great if you took it, but don't go out of your way to wake it.

PTs are your best hope for practicing for the real thing.

HonestAdvice
Posts: 396
Joined: Tue May 03, 2016 12:33 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby HonestAdvice » Wed Dec 21, 2016 9:59 pm

Nachoo2019 wrote:
HonestAdvice wrote:CJ majors do poorly on the LSAT, because for the most part, only bad colleges offer CJ. There's nothing about it that is bad for law school in and of itself.



CJ majors might do poorly on the LSAT but bad schools don't just offer CJ majors.... Just about every flagship state school in every state offers CJ and a lot of top private schools(including ivies) offer CJ. I have seen you give a lot of "Honest Advice" on TLS and it's largely a load of shit....

Would you be less offended if I had written: CJ majors do badly on the LSAT on paper, because the colleges with average LSAT's in the mid-160s or above don't offer CJ to artificially boost the average score?

Why else do you think they do poorly? Does studying CJ somehow make people worse at standardized testing?

1styearlateral
Posts: 630
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2016 3:55 pm

Re: Please help.

Postby 1styearlateral » Thu Dec 22, 2016 10:52 am

HonestAdvice wrote:. . . for the most part, only bad colleges offer CJ.

I always see CJ advertised on billboards and on the subway. So I would agree with this statement.




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: jdtodj and 4 guests