Withdrawing Etiquette

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srm04
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2014 11:04 am

Withdrawing Etiquette

Postby srm04 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:50 am

Hi All,

I have a few schools that I did not withdraw from, but the seat deposit deadline has passed. Should I still formally withdraw from these schools? There's one school I did not withdraw from, but would still consider attending if they upped their scholarship offer.... is it common for schools to reach out to accepted students about not putting their deposit down? Or are we just taken off the list completely?

Thanks.

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Capitol_Idea
Posts: 10696
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2011 11:54 am

Re: Withdrawing Etiquette

Postby Capitol_Idea » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:01 am

I emailed each to formally withdraw, and recommend this. It takes a couple minutes to fire off a pat email and helps them know to take you off the list sooner. Just common courtesy.

Others can correct me on this, but I think some places 'require' you to formally withdraw from other places (or maybe that's just ED applicants).

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MT Cicero
Posts: 574
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 7:40 pm

Re: Withdrawing Etiquette

Postby MT Cicero » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:10 am

zacharus85 wrote:I emailed each to formally withdraw, and recommend this. It takes a couple minutes to fire off a pat email and helps them know to take you off the list sooner. Just common courtesy.

Others can correct me on this, but I think some places 'require' you to formally withdraw from other places (or maybe that's just ED applicants).


This. It's easy and courteous.

Another benefit is the possibility of getting an increased offer, as OP alluded might change the calculus. While it may be remote chance, it did happen to me twice when I formally withdrew.

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fisheatbananas
Posts: 199
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2015 6:26 am

Re: Withdrawing Etiquette

Postby fisheatbananas » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:23 am

MT Cicero wrote:
zacharus85 wrote:I emailed each to formally withdraw, and recommend this. It takes a couple minutes to fire off a pat email and helps them know to take you off the list sooner. Just common courtesy.

Others can correct me on this, but I think some places 'require' you to formally withdraw from other places (or maybe that's just ED applicants).


This. It's easy and courteous.

Another benefit is the possibility of getting an increased offer, as OP alluded might change the calculus. While it may be remote chance, it did happen to me twice when I formally withdrew.


I got an increased offer when I formally withdrew as well. To answer OP's question yes they'll just take you off the list even if you don't formally withdraw, but as the previous posts say of course it's more polite to send an email.

For some of the schools where I formally withdrew, they replied asking which school I'm attending instead. So I started including that information in my first email just to save time.

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CoffeeIsLife
Posts: 223
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2014 3:25 pm

Re: Withdrawing Etiquette

Postby CoffeeIsLife » Tue Apr 21, 2015 11:32 am

Like others have said, you should just fire off a quick email telling them. Some I sent to were snarky and seemed upset, but multiple schools sent nice words and asked what type of offer it would take to make me reconsider. Worst case they don't care that you tell them, best case they offer you more money. Nothing to lose plenty to gain.

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TheSpanishMain
Posts: 4128
Joined: Tue Apr 02, 2013 2:26 pm

Re: Withdrawing Etiquette

Postby TheSpanishMain » Wed Apr 29, 2015 1:31 pm

Who was snarky/what did they say?




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