Telling your employer you're leaving

(Please Ask Questions and Answer Questions)
User avatar
ymmv
Posts: 19251
Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 1:36 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby ymmv » Tue Nov 15, 2016 5:33 am

cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:
cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:My suggestion is stay in your current job and skip law school. Yea, you applied and sunk some time into applying but nothing like the vast swathes of time, money and emotional energy you'll be sinking by attending. Gainfully employed individuals shouldn't leave their jobs to enroll in law school (any law school). If you get fired and can't find another FT position, that's a different story.

How serious is this post?


Deadly fucking serious. I reaffirm with another year and two thirds of hindsight.

I sent a PM so I wouldn't divulge my personal info, but to make this apply to other people, I'm curious as to how your advice pertains to those of us who are liberal arts majors and have somewhat crappy entry-level jobs with little upward mobility? I feel like going back to school is somewhat inevitable.


Particular UG degrees basically don't matter in the real world outside of engineering and accounting. This is true across a shitload of industries and positions. The business major is not at any advantage to the history major (probably a disadvantage, let's be honest) when it comes to getting any kind of business position, except insofar as she hustled more or took the time to learn basic job application/interview skills.

User avatar
SixSigma
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 5:05 am

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby SixSigma » Tue Nov 15, 2016 6:23 am

I'm at work right now. During my interview, I advised them that I would be leaving in July 2017 or 2018. The last time I resigned to get more education, I got my old job back with a pay bump when I returned. I'm only here because it pays more for easier duty. I guess it depends upon what you do and what kind of relationship you have with work.

Good times.

cantyoloforever
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:02 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby cantyoloforever » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:59 am

ymmv wrote:
cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:
cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:My suggestion is stay in your current job and skip law school. Yea, you applied and sunk some time into applying but nothing like the vast swathes of time, money and emotional energy you'll be sinking by attending. Gainfully employed individuals shouldn't leave their jobs to enroll in law school (any law school). If you get fired and can't find another FT position, that's a different story.

How serious is this post?


Deadly fucking serious. I reaffirm with another year and two thirds of hindsight.

I sent a PM so I wouldn't divulge my personal info, but to make this apply to other people, I'm curious as to how your advice pertains to those of us who are liberal arts majors and have somewhat crappy entry-level jobs with little upward mobility? I feel like going back to school is somewhat inevitable.


Particular UG degrees basically don't matter in the real world outside of engineering and accounting. This is true across a shitload of industries and positions. The business major is not at any advantage to the history major (probably a disadvantage, let's be honest) when it comes to getting any kind of business position, except insofar as she hustled more or took the time to learn basic job application/interview skills.

So, how true do you think is the statement that anyone who can get a full-time job should not leave it for law school?

User avatar
jbagelboy
Posts: 10174
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:57 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby jbagelboy » Tue Nov 15, 2016 2:30 pm

To qualify a little, I think someone with a full time salaried job should not quit to take out loans to go to law school. If you are a non-exempt/wage laborer or you can go to a good school without taking on debt, it starts making more sense to go to law school.

addie1412
Posts: 542
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:43 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby addie1412 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:48 pm

jbagelboy wrote:To qualify a little, I think someone with a full time salaried job should not quit to take out loans to go to law school. If you are a non-exempt/wage laborer or you can go to a good school without taking on debt, it starts making more sense to go to law school.


What if your salary is horse shit, you have to live with your parents and every morning you come into work you literally can't fathom how you're going to get through the next 8 hours?

Making debt payments for the rest of my life > current situation

User avatar
jbagelboy
Posts: 10174
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:57 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby jbagelboy » Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:54 pm

addie1412 wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:To qualify a little, I think someone with a full time salaried job should not quit to take out loans to go to law school. If you are a non-exempt/wage laborer or you can go to a good school without taking on debt, it starts making more sense to go to law school.


What if your salary is horse shit, you have to live with your parents and every morning you come into work you literally can't fathom how you're going to get through the next 8 hours?

Making debt payments for the rest of my life > current situation


Those other things won't change. You'll just keep less of your take home pay. What do you imagine school and work life as a lawyer will offer you that you can't access now by making other changes?

Maybe your job really is shit and law school really will change your personal circumstances for the better. But maybe it won't. The grass is not greener and I'm just saying these choices must be made with care.

addie1412
Posts: 542
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:43 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby addie1412 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 8:04 pm

jbagelboy wrote:
addie1412 wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:To qualify a little, I think someone with a full time salaried job should not quit to take out loans to go to law school. If you are a non-exempt/wage laborer or you can go to a good school without taking on debt, it starts making more sense to go to law school.


What if your salary is horse shit, you have to live with your parents and every morning you come into work you literally can't fathom how you're going to get through the next 8 hours?

Making debt payments for the rest of my life > current situation


Those other things won't change. You'll just keep less of your take home pay. What do you imagine school and work life as a lawyer will offer you that you can't access now by making other changes?

Maybe your job really is shit and law school really will change your personal circumstances for the better. But maybe it won't. The grass is not greener and I'm just saying these choices must be made with care.


More than 24 grand and a job that's at least a tiny step up from secretary, ideally. I'm pretty sure I'll at least be taking home more than 24 grand once I make my loan payments for the year, whatever they happen to be.

I have been trying to find a new job for about six months. Apparently it's easier to score 175+ on the LSAT than find a non-shitty job as a philosophy major. Law school here I come!

zeglo
Posts: 664
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:42 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby zeglo » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:08 pm

.
Last edited by zeglo on Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
jkpolk
Posts: 1097
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 10:44 am

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby jkpolk » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:19 pm

jbagelboy wrote:
cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:My suggestion is stay in your current job and skip law school. Yea, you applied and sunk some time into applying but nothing like the vast swathes of time, money and emotional energy you'll be sinking by attending. Gainfully employed individuals shouldn't leave their jobs to enroll in law school (any law school). If you get fired and can't find another FT position, that's a different story.

How serious is this post?


Deadly fucking serious. I reaffirm with another year and two thirds of hindsight.


Agreed.

User avatar
Barack O'Drama
Posts: 2432
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2012 7:21 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby Barack O'Drama » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:22 pm

zeglo wrote:I have a nice-paying corporate job as an analyst. But that doesn't necessarily mean I like it!

User avatar
guynourmin
Posts: 3426
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2016 11:42 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby guynourmin » Thu Nov 17, 2016 1:53 pm

addie1412 wrote:Apparently it's easier to score 175+ on the LSAT than find a non-shitty job as a philosophy major.


As a philosophy major with not real practical skill set except reading well and kind of working hard sometimes, I hate this shit. Make yourself valuable. just applying and hoping something sticks isn't the way to go. Get in and work your way up from there. I went from a $10/hr paper organizer at a law firm to more than doubling what I was making in less than a year by showing what I learned to a new firm, and well over doubling that within another year and a half or so. Definitely sucks trying to grind on $20k/yr, but everyone starts somewhere. Not to say you shouldn't go to law school, but you have to work hard either way, right?

cantyoloforever
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:02 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby cantyoloforever » Thu Nov 17, 2016 6:04 pm

jbagelboy wrote:To qualify a little, I think someone with a full time salaried job should not quit to take out loans to go to law school. If you are a non-exempt/wage laborer or you can go to a good school without taking on debt, it starts making more sense to go to law school.

Hmmm this is pretty interesting. I do have a full-time salaried job that I actually enjoy, but I can't see myself doing this forever. Also, I definitely would not take out loans to go to law school. I figure if I can get into a top 20 school without loans, then it's worth going.

addie1412
Posts: 542
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:43 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby addie1412 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 11:08 am

guybourdin wrote:
addie1412 wrote:Apparently it's easier to score 175+ on the LSAT than find a non-shitty job as a philosophy major.


As a philosophy major with not real practical skill set except reading well and kind of working hard sometimes, I hate this shit. Make yourself valuable. just applying and hoping something sticks isn't the way to go. Get in and work your way up from there. I went from a $10/hr paper organizer at a law firm to more than doubling what I was making in less than a year by showing what I learned to a new firm, and well over doubling that within another year and a half or so. Definitely sucks trying to grind on $20k/yr, but everyone starts somewhere. Not to say you shouldn't go to law school, but you have to work hard either way, right?



Law school presents a concrete alternative for making oneself valuable. Pursuing a T-14 JD is a more clear-cut path to value and employability than is “working your way up.” What does that even mean? What does that entail? Where do you start? What steps do you take? It comes down to how you prefer to grind. I know how to work hard in some settings (grades, tests, etc) but I’m not a hustler. For me, getting into a good law school and doing well there is the kind of hard work that suits me. “Working my way up” is an undefined black box requiring creativity, patience and faith I don’t have. YMMV.

cantyoloforever
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:02 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby cantyoloforever » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:46 pm

addie1412 wrote:
guybourdin wrote:
addie1412 wrote:Apparently it's easier to score 175+ on the LSAT than find a non-shitty job as a philosophy major.


As a philosophy major with not real practical skill set except reading well and kind of working hard sometimes, I hate this shit. Make yourself valuable. just applying and hoping something sticks isn't the way to go. Get in and work your way up from there. I went from a $10/hr paper organizer at a law firm to more than doubling what I was making in less than a year by showing what I learned to a new firm, and well over doubling that within another year and a half or so. Definitely sucks trying to grind on $20k/yr, but everyone starts somewhere. Not to say you shouldn't go to law school, but you have to work hard either way, right?



Law school presents a concrete alternative for making oneself valuable. Pursuing a T-14 JD is a more clear-cut path to value and employability than is “working your way up.” What does that even mean? What does that entail? Where do you start? What steps do you take? It comes down to how you prefer to grind. I know how to work hard in some settings (grades, tests, etc) but I’m not a hustler. For me, getting into a good law school and doing well there is the kind of hard work that suits me. “Working my way up” is an undefined black box requiring creativity, patience and faith I don’t have. YMMV.

I agree with both of these posts

zeglo
Posts: 664
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:42 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby zeglo » Fri Nov 18, 2016 11:56 pm

.
Last edited by zeglo on Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
RZ5646
Posts: 2395
Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 1:31 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby RZ5646 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:54 am

I'm a philosophy major with a satisfying, salaried STEM job. It is possible. But you have to find the right employer at the right time.

addie1412
Posts: 542
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:43 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby addie1412 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 1:06 pm

zeglo wrote:Would would major in philosophy in contemporary society? Pick a practical major even if you're going to law school. I am one year out making much more than that.


Hindsight's 20/20

cavalier1138
Posts: 4295
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:01 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby cavalier1138 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 3:29 pm

zeglo wrote:Would would major in philosophy in contemporary society? Pick a practical major even if you're going to law school. I am one year out making much more than that.


Or study something that you're actually interested in and don't make the accumulation of material goods the sole focus of your life.

zeglo
Posts: 664
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:42 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby zeglo » Sat Nov 19, 2016 3:33 pm

.
Last edited by zeglo on Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

cantyoloforever
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:02 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby cantyoloforever » Sat Nov 19, 2016 6:08 pm

I just got laid off....looks like I'll still be going to law school lol

Monday
Posts: 784
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 9:36 am

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby Monday » Sun Nov 20, 2016 11:41 pm

.
Last edited by Monday on Wed May 10, 2017 11:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

cantyoloforever
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:02 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby cantyoloforever » Sat Nov 26, 2016 4:20 pm

cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:To qualify a little, I think someone with a full time salaried job should not quit to take out loans to go to law school. If you are a non-exempt/wage laborer or you can go to a good school without taking on debt, it starts making more sense to go to law school.

Hmmm this is pretty interesting. I do have a full-time salaried job that I actually enjoy, but I can't see myself doing this forever. Also, I definitely would not take out loans to go to law school. I figure if I can get into a top 20 school without loans, then it's worth going.

So t-20 without loans still a good deal? Just got laid off from my full-time salaried job, and I don't see my field (content marketing lol) getting much better. It's booming right now in terms of job growth, but it's still lowish pay, and a lot of it will be automated in the near future.

User avatar
northwood
Posts: 4907
Joined: Fri May 14, 2010 7:29 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby northwood » Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:51 pm

jkpolk wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:
cantyoloforever wrote:
jbagelboy wrote:My suggestion is stay in your current job and skip law school. Yea, you applied and sunk some time into applying but nothing like the vast swathes of time, money and emotional energy you'll be sinking by attending. Gainfully employed individuals shouldn't leave their jobs to enroll in law school (any law school). If you get fired and can't find another FT position, that's a different story.

How serious is this post?


Deadly fucking serious. I reaffirm with another year and two thirds of hindsight.


Agreed.


+1

zeglo
Posts: 664
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 9:42 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby zeglo » Sun Nov 27, 2016 10:28 am

.
Last edited by zeglo on Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Nobiggie
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Oct 30, 2016 11:40 pm

Re: Telling your employer you're leaving

Postby Nobiggie » Sun Nov 27, 2016 1:47 pm

I'm telling my employer on January 6 that I'm leaving on January 25.




Return to “Law School FAQ”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests