Patent Law

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shimmyr.n
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Patent Law

Postby shimmyr.n » Tue Oct 15, 2013 3:53 pm

I am currently an Undergrad student in my second year seriously considering a career in law. I am also very science inclined and am strongly considering a career in patent law. I am trying to figure out what major might be best for someone considering patent law? Also, would majoring in Computer Science be a good major?

I am definitely more math/physics inclined than bio/chemistry

Thank you in advance for your answers

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yot11
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Re: Patent Law

Postby yot11 » Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:54 pm

Traditionally the hottest patent law majors are EE and ME. In recent times, CS has been very popular as well.

More importantly, pick the major that you like the best and will do well in.

mx23250
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Re: Patent Law

Postby mx23250 » Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:48 am

I'd also recommend EE or ME if you enjoy physics and math. You should also know that it would be in your best interest to attend grad school prior to law school if you intend on having the best career options possible. If you went bio/chem you would almost certainly need a PhD, but with EE or ME a masters degree would suffice. It's possible to do it with just a bachelor's, but even patent law is a competitive field and those with masters degrees would have a major advantage. Some big law firms will even require at least a masters degree in order to apply due to the number of applicants they get.

pmench31
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Re: Patent Law

Postby pmench31 » Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:00 pm

Depending on what law school you get into, EE/CS bachelors degree will leave you with more opportunities than anyone else you know in law school who is not EE/CS.

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Dr. Review
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Dr. Review » Thu Oct 17, 2013 1:02 pm

EE or physics (more EE than physics) are the hottest right now. Bio is going to lean much more towards an advanced degree, and chem/chemE can be a bit of a niche area at times, depending on the market (I am a chem guy). Materials science is relatively uncommon, and allows some interesting options, albeit the hiring is not as hot as EE.

ME used to be the hot ticket, but I think a little of that has gone by the wayside because many mechanical applications can be written by practitioners from other areas.

The big job fairs and hiring boards seem to make room for EEs where no other background has access.

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DildaMan
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Re: Patent Law

Postby DildaMan » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:49 pm

EE/CE/CS are all pretty strong atm.

Mizz
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Mizz » Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:40 am

I'd say it can depend on if you want to do litigation or prosecution. For prosecution, EE is best. There is high demand and you won't need an advanced degree. For prosecution in the life sciences you'll need an advanced degree.

For litigation, it's not that much of a difference. There is a lot of life sciences lit work in NY and Boston if you decide you want to go that route. With the Actavis case ruling I'd be shocked if it didn't increase the demand in the biotech/pharma field if you decide to go BME or biochem.

shimmyr.n
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Re: Patent Law

Postby shimmyr.n » Wed Oct 23, 2013 3:34 pm

Thank you all for your answers. I just had one more quick question. Is being a Physics Major enough of a qualification to get a good job (I'm not talking from the standpoint of the USPTO)??

Thanks again

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Dr. Review
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Dr. Review » Wed Oct 23, 2013 3:45 pm

shimmyr.n wrote:Thank you all for your answers. I just had one more quick question. Is being a Physics Major enough of a qualification to get a good job (I'm not talking from the standpoint of the USPTO)??

Thanks again


Physics is pretty solid. A lot of employers hire EE/Physics interchangeably.

Mizz
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Mizz » Wed Oct 23, 2013 6:25 pm

Generally speaking, major will matter more for pros than lit. Law school grades will matter more for lit than pros, and will matter much more than UG major.

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dnptan
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Re: Patent Law

Postby dnptan » Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:53 am

IP consultant here. I have a Biomedical Engineering degree and usually get assigned to medical devices. Our group is the largest and busiest, but we are Boston-based, so biotech is huge.

Our other big and busy departments are the telecom group, the electronics group and the mechanical group. Respectively, EE, EE and ME. We don't hire CS grads since they aren't as flexible and patent law tends to be a very interdisciplinary field. I am sure that it's different in CA, where IT is a much bigger player. Also note that this is PATENT LAW, not TRADEMARK LAW. CS would be more useful in trademark. If you want to do patent law, be wary of CS. The patentability of computer programs are currently being re-evaluated.

Feel free to PM me for more specific questions.

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dnptan
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Re: Patent Law

Postby dnptan » Wed Oct 30, 2013 10:55 am

shimmyr.n wrote:Thank you all for your answers. I just had one more quick question. Is being a Physics Major enough of a qualification to get a good job (I'm not talking from the standpoint of the USPTO)??

Thanks again


Sorry for the double post.

Our company hires B.S. Engineers and Ph.D. Physics. No undergrad non-engineers here. Obviously my company doesn't represent the market, but I can say with confidence that an ENG degree is more valuable in IP consulting than a Physics degree, unless you're planning to go Ph.D.

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chem
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Re: Patent Law

Postby chem » Wed Oct 30, 2013 11:03 am

dnptan wrote:
shimmyr.n wrote:Thank you all for your answers. I just had one more quick question. Is being a Physics Major enough of a qualification to get a good job (I'm not talking from the standpoint of the USPTO)??

Thanks again


Sorry for the double post.

Our company hires B.S. Engineers and Ph.D. Physics. No undergrad non-engineers here. Obviously my company doesn't represent the market, but I can say with confidence that an ENG degree is more valuable in IP consulting than a Physics degree, unless you're planning to go Ph.D.


Matches up with my experience too. You get much more mileage out of EE than physics.

IpleadtheFiF
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Re: Patent Law

Postby IpleadtheFiF » Wed Oct 30, 2013 6:56 pm

shimmyr.n wrote:Thank you all for your answers. I just had one more quick question. Is being a Physics Major enough of a qualification to get a good job (I'm not talking from the standpoint of the USPTO)??

Thanks again


If you are talented and hardworking enough to study physics, then engineering should be fun. Prepare your spring classes now because if you don't take statics and dynamics before junior year, it might take awhile to graduate.

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MormonChristian
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Re: Patent Law

Postby MormonChristian » Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:39 pm

shimmyr.n wrote:I am currently an Undergrad student in my second year seriously considering a career in law. I am also very science inclined and am strongly considering a career in patent law. I am trying to figure out what major might be best for someone considering patent law?


Engineering is the way to go for the higher paying jobs and the best chance at getting a job. Biomedical Engineering > Electrical Engineering > Chemical Engineering >biochemical engineering > Computer Engineering > Mechanical Engineering> material engineering > Civil Engineering >> the non-real engineering (agricultural,industrial, textile, social, nuclear, geophysical, aerospace, audio, environmental, and mining .

Phd > M.S. > B.S. > B.A.

Work Experience > no-work Experience


shimmyr.n wrote: Also, would majoring in Computer Science be a good major?

I am definitely more math/physics inclined than bio/chemistry



Physics > computer science > chemistry > biochemistry >> biology

Assuming your major is accredited through the proper channels.

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Bronte
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Bronte » Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:55 pm

Mizz wrote:Generally speaking, major will matter more for pros than lit. Law school grades will matter more for lit than pros, and will matter much more than UG major.


Not an IP guy, but this is true from my observation. A friend of mine has just a bachelor's in chemistry but was on law review at a top 14 school. He had no problem getting a job at a top firm doing IP litigation. He works on matters that don't necessarily have anything to do with chemistry.

Then again I don't know how an undergraduate is going to know whether he wants to do prosecution or litigation. Also, probably best to do the most marketable degree, both for the legal industry and in general. There's a good chance you'll decide later you don't want to do this.

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Dr. Review
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Dr. Review » Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:35 pm

Bronte wrote:
Mizz wrote:Generally speaking, major will matter more for pros than lit. Law school grades will matter more for lit than pros, and will matter much more than UG major.


Not an IP guy, but this is true from my observation. A friend of mine has just a bachelor's in chemistry but was on law review at a top 14 school. He had no problem getting a job at a top firm doing IP litigation. He works on matters that don't necessarily have anything to do with chemistry.

Then again I don't know how an undergraduate is going to know whether he wants to do prosecution or litigation. Also, probably best to do the most marketable degree, both for the legal industry and in general. There's a good chance you'll decide later you don't want to do this.


On the flip side, I was median-ish at a t2 with a bachelor's in chem and I had multiple offers, primarily doing pros.

Aureusmons
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Aureusmons » Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:59 pm

Original redacted
Last edited by Aureusmons on Wed Apr 15, 2015 10:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

DIggidy
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Re: Patent Law

Postby DIggidy » Tue Dec 24, 2013 11:10 am

I was hoping this thread could help answer some questions for me, as I'm thinking about patent law and wanted to get advice.

I am completing an Engineering Physics degree (within engineering school, will graduate with engineering degree, but there is a lot of physics as well within my degree). I have one year left, and have around a 3.9GPA from a top 20 engineering school based off of UWNews. I have done a summer internship, and will have 3 years of research completed (with hopefully at least one first author publication) by graduation. I have not taken the LSAT yet.

Now, with my background out of the way, I was hoping to gain some advice. First, would you recommend I go to graduate school (If I did, I would most likely go for ME)? I do not want to get my PhD, but I will get a masters if it will greatly improve career chances in the future. Second, because I've been so active within engineering during undergrad, I really haven't done much as for non-engineering extra-curriculars. My brother is in medical school and I know he had to do a lot of that for his application, is the same required for law school?

09042014
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Re: Patent Law

Postby 09042014 » Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:18 pm

Aureusmons wrote:
dnptan wrote:IP consultant here. I have a Biomedical Engineering degree and usually get assigned to medical devices. Our group is the largest and busiest, but we are Boston-based, so biotech is huge.

Our other big and busy departments are the telecom group, the electronics group and the mechanical group. Respectively, EE, EE and ME. We don't hire CS grads since they aren't as flexible and patent law tends to be a very interdisciplinary field. I am sure that it's different in CA, where IT is a much bigger player. Also note that this is PATENT LAW, not TRADEMARK LAW. CS would be more useful in trademark. If you want to do patent law, be wary of CS. The patentability of computer programs are currently being re-evaluated.

Feel free to PM me for more specific questions.


You mean copyright law, not trademark law? And software is frequently patented, so at least in California, CS is in high demand (not as high as EE or CE but still high).

My advice is to go into CE or EE even if you don't like them that much because physics and math are not practical and you will regret it when you graduate (unless you're the rare math or physics genius).


Nobody does copyright law because copyright infringement isn't that common. Nor is it hard to understand. It's not really a huge specialty.

Trademarks aren't technical at all.

09042014
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Re: Patent Law

Postby 09042014 » Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:19 pm

DIggidy wrote:I was hoping this thread could help answer some questions for me, as I'm thinking about patent law and wanted to get advice.

I am completing an Engineering Physics degree (within engineering school, will graduate with engineering degree, but there is a lot of physics as well within my degree). I have one year left, and have around a 3.9GPA from a top 20 engineering school based off of UWNews. I have done a summer internship, and will have 3 years of research completed (with hopefully at least one first author publication) by graduation. I have not taken the LSAT yet.

Now, with my background out of the way, I was hoping to gain some advice. First, would you recommend I go to graduate school (If I did, I would most likely go for ME)? I do not want to get my PhD, but I will get a masters if it will greatly improve career chances in the future. Second, because I've been so active within engineering during undergrad, I really haven't done much as for non-engineering extra-curriculars. My brother is in medical school and I know he had to do a lot of that for his application, is the same required for law school?


Don't go to law school. Be an engineer.

09042014
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Re: Patent Law

Postby 09042014 » Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:21 pm

EE > CS because the generally feeling is that EE can do anything a CS major can do because software patents are retardedly simplistic.

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Dr. Review
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Dr. Review » Tue Dec 24, 2013 3:26 pm

For law school, grad school as an ME isn't really worth it. Advanced degrees that make the most sense are chemistry, biotech related, EE and similar.

Arcticlynx
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Re: Patent Law

Postby Arcticlynx » Sat Dec 28, 2013 8:49 am

Bedsole wrote:
Bronte wrote:
Mizz wrote:Generally speaking, major will matter more for pros than lit. Law school grades will matter more for lit than pros, and will matter much more than UG major.


Not an IP guy, but this is true from my observation. A friend of mine has just a bachelor's in chemistry but was on law review at a top 14 school. He had no problem getting a job at a top firm doing IP litigation. He works on matters that don't necessarily have anything to do with chemistry.

Then again I don't know how an undergraduate is going to know whether he wants to do prosecution or litigation. Also, probably best to do the most marketable degree, both for the legal industry and in general. There's a good chance you'll decide later you don't want to do this.


On the flip side, I was median-ish at a t2 with a bachelor's in chem and I had multiple offers, primarily doing pros.


When was this?? I have a bachelor's in chem + WE and am looking at IP as a back-up (plan B) in case I can't get a job in Environmental/Public Interest right out of law school. Probably going to a first tier (15-25) school, hopefully with $$$.

09042014
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Re: Patent Law

Postby 09042014 » Sat Dec 28, 2013 3:32 pm

Bedsole wrote:For law school, grad school as an ME isn't really worth it. Advanced degrees that make the most sense are chemistry, biotech related, EE and similar.


MSEE is pretty useless for law school (and for industry).




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